Column: Following the Wanderer

What does it mean to be wise? Is it better to be only “middling-wise,” or to accept the trouble of deeper wisdom? Karl Seigfried investigates passages from the Hávamál and ponders what they mean for those who seek to be wise.

Column: A Wall of Stone

Sheri Barker builds a stone wall at the Bear Path Cottage, and finds herself communing with the spirits of her land and with the poetry of Robert Frost.

Review: three Pagan poets for National Poetry Month

If, as is proclaimed in the Charge of the Goddess, “all acts of love and pleasure are my rituals,” then the pleasure of poetry is among those rituals, too. April is National Poetry Month in the United States. Here’s a look at the works of three female poets: a Wiccan priestess, a pioneer in the modern women’s/goddess spirituality movement, and a priestess in the Welsh Bardic Tradition. The Charge of the Goddess: the Poetry of Doreen Valiente
Doreen Valiente Foundation in association with the Centre for Pagan Studies, expanded edition 2014, 142 p.

Ironically, the Charge of the Goddess included is this collection by the acclaimed “mother of modern witchcraft” is not her rhyming, poetic rendition but rather her far more famous prose version. The late John Belham-Payne, a friend and “working magical partner” of Valiente’s, shepherded her poetry into publication following her death in 1999, thus fulfilling a deathbed request by the Wiccan priestess who had been initiated into Gerald Gardner’s coven by the man himself in 1953.