Column: Thor’s Hammer in Iceland – an Interview with Ragnheiður Gló Gylfadóttir

Pagan Perspectives

A farmstead from the Viking Age was found earlier this month by a local resident in Þjórsárdalur, a valley in the southern highlands of Iceland. Bergur Þór Björnsson is the great-grandson of the man who discovered the region’s most recently found Viking-era farm back in 1920. With his new find, the total number of known farms stands at twenty-one. Archaeologists from Fornleifastofnun Ísland (“the Institute of Archaeology in Iceland”) were called to the scene and soon found several small objects. Among them was a Thor’s hammer amulet, only the second ever found in Iceland.

Uncovering the past: Zominthos, the Hyksos, ancient beer and more

As some Pagans and Heathens attempt to revive ancient or indigenous religions they often rely on the work of historians, primary texts and archaeologists. For this reason, when something new pops up that challenges long held academic ideas on cultural or religious practice, we pay attention. Here are some of the new(er) finds making waves in archaeological circles. Zominthos at Crete
ZOMINTHOS, Crete — In the early 80s, archaeologists found a complex structure at Zominthos in Crete. The Archaeological Institute of American maintains an active website about this site with field notes from 2005 through 2018.

Uncovering the Past: Shigir idol, Mayan city of Nixtun-Ch’ich, ancient drug use, and more

As some Pagans and Heathens attempt to revive ancient or indigenous religions they often rely on the work of historians, primary texts and archaeologists. For this reason, when something new pops up that challenges long held academic ideas on cultural or religious practice, we pay attention. Here are some of the new(er) finds making waves in archaeological circles. The Shigir idol
YEKATERINGBURG, Russia — In 1894, gold prospectors near Yekaterinburg, 880 miles east of Moscow, found a carved wooden statue 16 feet, 4.8 inches (5 meters) long. Images of human faces, human hands, and zig zag cover the statue; t also had a human head at its top.

Uncovering the Past: altar of Zeus, Germanic battle, skulls and more

As some Pagans and Heathens attempt to revive ancient or indigenous religions they often rely on the work of historians, primary texts and archaeologists. For this reason, when something new pops up that challenges long held academic ideas on cultural or religious practice, we pay attention. Here are some of the new(er) finds making waves in archaeological circles. Altar of Zeus at Lykaion
MOUNT LYKAION, Greece — This mountaintop in the Peloponnese, and Mount Ida in Crete, are both claimed to be the birthplace of Zeus. Archaeological teams have excavated at Mount Lykaion for over a decade.

Uncovering the Past: Feasting Halls, Viking Warriors, and Fake News

As some Pagans and Heathens attempt to revive ancient or indigenous religions they often rely on the work of historians, primary texts and archaeologists. For this reason, when something new pops up that challenges long held academic ideas on cultural or religious practice, we pay attention. Here are some of the new(er) finds making waves in archaeological circles. Did the Ark of the Covenant contain Pagan gods? Archaeologists have long looked for the Ark of the Covenant, a large case the Bible says contains the broken pieces of the Ten Commandments.