Surviving Language Loss and Native Cultures

The Wild Hunt . In early October 2018, Alaskan Governor Bill Walker declared a linguistic emergency. Alaska has 20 indigenous Native American languages that may all become extinct within a hundred years, unless people do something to preserve them. Linguists define a language as extinct when no living person can speak that language. The National Indian Educational Association reports that only 20 Native languages are expected to survive to 2050.

Unleash the Hounds! (link roundup)

There are lots of articles and essays of interest to modern Pagans and Heathens out there, more than our team can write about in depth in any given week. Therefore, the Wild Hunt must unleash the hounds in order to round them all up. 

The Iceland Monitor has reported that the long-awaited Ásatrú temple in Öskjuhlíð in Reykjavik will be completed by summer 2018. The article states that this information was confirmed with the Ásatrú organization’s head chieftain Hilmar Örn Himarsson. The construction proved to be more difficult than planned; however, the work is ongoing. The United National Educational, Scientific, Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has added to its “Memory of the World” registry 130 Roman curse tablets that “bear messages from the Roman occupants of Bath seeking revenge from a goddess.”  They are the “only artefacts from Roman Britain,” reports UNESCO.

Protecting the Boreal Forest: Pimachiowin Aki

MANITOBA — In 2002, the five Anishinaabe First Nations of Bloodvein River, Little Grand Rapids, Poplar River, Pikangikum and Pauingassi joined forces with the provincial governments of Manitoba and Ontario to create Pimachiowin Aki (Pim-MATCH-cho-win Ahh-Key), a unique and pristine Boreal forest area, rich in indigenous culture and nature. They put forth a proposal to have it declared a UNESCO World Heritage site. This vast tract of land covers 33,400 square kilometers (20,754 sq. miles) and straddles the Manitoba/Ontario border. It is an area comparable in size to the country of Denmark.