Column: Honoring My Ancestors without Visiting Their Tombs

Pagan Perspectives

Today’s column comes to us from international columnist Alan D.D., who writes to us from Venezuela. In addition to writing for The Wild Hunt, Alan is a journalist, blogger, and novelist. También está disponible en español. The Wild Hunt always welcomes submissions for our weekend section. Please send queries or completed pieces to eric@wildhunt.org.

Columna: Honrar a mis ancestros sin visitar sus tumbas

Pagan Perspectives

Hoy, Alan D.D., unos de nuestro columnista internacional, nos escribe desde Venezuela. Además de escribir para The Wild Hunt, Alan es periodista, blogger y novelista. Today’s column is also available in English. The Wild Hunt siempre dará la bienvenida a escritos para nuestra sección de fin de semana. Por favor envíe sus preguntas o piezas completas a eric@wildhunt.org.

The Wild Hunt 2018 Winter Solstice Gift Guide

Here it is. Black Friday: The invented retail holiday after the dysfunctional dinner of glut when you’re supposed to buy something for everyone who participated; and celebrate the capitalistic commercialism of conspicuous excess. We get it. Black Friday drips with existential hypocrisy and all the obscenities of greed. So, here’s our gift guide.

Review: five music albums for Pagans by non-Pagans

TWH — During a 2002 concert in Daytona Beach, Fla., by Tool, that esoteric prog-metal band, I found myself shapeshifted. “I would totally trance-journey to the underworld if this was played at a Samhain ritual!” I thought. Similarly, while listening to a CD by Sufi singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan, I realized: “Wow, this music would blow up my crown chakra at a Beltane celebration!”

Such has been my reaction to hearing live and recorded music many times during the two and a half decades that my Pagan path has coincided with my career as an arts, entertainment and music writer at daily newspapers. Non-Pagan music (however one may define that nebulous term) can unexpectedly transport one into Pagan space-time. With that in mind, here’s a look at five music albums for Pagans by non-Pagans.

Column: Using music for journey work and meditation

When I’m trying to get in the mood to spend time at my altar, there are so many considerations and preparations that I have to make. In my practice I work with oils, waters, stones, herbs, incense, colored candles, fabrics, statuary, dolls (you don’t?), and ritual tools. Thankfully over the years I’ve filtered out what I like and what works, so I don’t need to recreate the wheel when I want to do a sabbat ritual or a major working that requires an overhaul of my altar elements. While scent and color and all of the other aesthetics can be helpful, how often are you bringing music into your practice? It’s something we see all of the time in other practices, so why not ours?