Column: Honoring My Ancestors without Visiting Their Tombs

Pagan Perspectives

Today’s column comes to us from international columnist Alan D.D., who writes to us from Venezuela. In addition to writing for The Wild Hunt, Alan is a journalist, blogger, and novelist. También está disponible en español. The Wild Hunt always welcomes submissions for our weekend section. Please send queries or completed pieces to eric@wildhunt.org.

Columna: Honrar a mis ancestros sin visitar sus tumbas

Pagan Perspectives

Hoy, Alan D.D., unos de nuestro columnista internacional, nos escribe desde Venezuela. Además de escribir para The Wild Hunt, Alan es periodista, blogger y novelista. Today’s column is also available in English. The Wild Hunt siempre dará la bienvenida a escritos para nuestra sección de fin de semana. Por favor envíe sus preguntas o piezas completas a eric@wildhunt.org.

Column: “In Venezuela, Witchcraft is everywhere”

Pagan Perspectives

[Today’s column is our first from our new international columnist, Alan D.D. Alan’s column will cover Paganism in Venezuela. In addition to writing for The Wild Hunt, Alan is a journalist, blogger, and novelist. We’re thrilled to have him aboard, and we hope you will be too.]

Thinking of the relationship between Venezuela and Witchcraft could be complication. Before I met L.J. Tang, I supposed there were no names I could consider when searching for a reference in the Venezeulan national context. Tang, however, who has a bachelor’s degree in international studies with a speciality in etiquette and protocol, dedicates most of his time to the Craft through the courses he teaches and the articles he writes about the occult.

When asked what made him start studying Witchcraft, Tang first specifies that he sees a difference between being a magician and being a Witch: “You can be a ceremonial magician without being a Witch, but my Witchcraft tradition contains a strong influence of ceremonial magic.”