Archives For Facebook

While the hate group Daesh continues to make headlines for its military and terrorist acts, attacks upon the the Goddess Isis for simply sharing a name with a common acronym for these Islamic extremists continues to be under reported. The number of Isis worshippers is eclipsed by those who follow an Abrahamic path, making it understandable on some level that mainstream media outlets dismiss those concerns, such as the statement by the Fellowship of Isis requesting that the name of their goddess not be used in such a manner.

The goddess Isis.

The goddess Isis. [Public Domain]

However, incidents such as the vandalism at Isis Books & Gifts, which has led the owner to erect a new sign downplaying the name of the goddess, demonstrate that the confusion continues to have a very real impact on members of the Pagan community.

More recently, a small Facebook group called “Following Isis” was removed, purportedly for violating the site’s terms of service. Its creator, AJ Melia Brokaw, was confronted with that news when she logged into the site on Feb 5. Brokaw posted her reaction to several other groups of which she is a member. She wrote:

I’m so upset. I got on this morning to find that my Isis Devotee group “Following Isis” has been deleted by Facebook as being against community standards. It wasn’t a very active group but it feels like a smack in the face. Will see if I can get it reinstated.

Anyone who has attempted to get a decision like this one reversed has likely found the process of appeal to be extremely challenging, if not outright impossible to navigate. The reviewing of complaints about individual accounts, groups, and pages appears to be a completely automated process. If a decision is made, the affected user is provided no specific information, and offered no clear path to appeal.

For example, this helpdesk post by a group owner asking for information on how to get the decision reviewed was apparently ignored.

All Brokaw knows came in a formulaic message advising her that the group had been removed. It wasn’t exactly an active group, she said, with less than thirty members and only occasional posts in the 6-12 months since she’d created it. While she didn’t have a copy of the exact text to look at, in her recollection the group’s description was, “Something along the line that it was a place for devotees of the Goddess Isis, any were welcome whether Wiccan or Polytheist.”

Posts ran along the lines of quotes, images, and articles relevant to the worship of Isis, under that name or others, such as Aset and Iset.

Presentation1An ironic twist stems from the fact that Brokaw made the group because it’s difficult to find anything related to the Goddess Isis on Facebook. The name is mostly used in groups and pages focused on opposing Daesh under its moniker of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, which is commonly used in mainstream media despite the fact that most governmental officials refer to the group as ISIL or Daesh. Brokaw wanted a space to honor a goddess important to her in the company of like-minded users, of which there were at least a handful. The one page that  does continue to stand out against the tide of terrorist-related information is the one maintained by members of the Fellowship of Isis.

Both Brokaw and The Wild Hunt have made numerous attempts to contact someone at Facebook to discuss this issue, to no avail. A contact in the public relations department did not return seven messages left for him, and the emails sent to the address provided in his outgoing voice mail message were returned with an email error that occurs only when an email server will only accept messages from a specific list of domains. This suggests that the system is designed to be used internally by Facebook employees only. A similar non-response resulted from inquiries into some Pagan Facebook pages being hacked.

Given that Facebook continues to be where people gather, and no social networking alternatives have emerged which have taken any measurable number of users away from the site, its employees will likely be able to continue to ignore such concerns for the foreseeable future. While Brokaw is still looking into getting her group restored, she understands this reality, and to some extent has resigned herself to it.

She’s created a new group, one with what she hopes is a clearer name: “Following Isis, Goddess of Many Names.”  Perhaps that will be enough to keep it off of the virtual execution block.

Circle Sanctuary logoCircle Sanctuary has announced the launch of its new membership program. Since its founding in 1974, Circle has been an open organization that has relied predominantly on donations, volunteerism and community support without any form of official membership needed. At Imbolc, organizers officially changed Circle’s traditional structure. In a press release, they wrote, “By creating a more formal membership program, we can open stronger channels of communication; learn from our members about how we can support their spiritual and personal development; and focus on members’ needs now and in the times to come.”

Membership is open to a wide variety of people, limited only by a willingness to agree to “a set of three basic ethical tenets” involving nature, respect and inclusivity. Organizers said, “Circle Sanctuary’s community has always been diverse, including Pagans, Wiccans, Druids, Polytheists,Heathens, Unitarian Universalists, Witches, Humanists, Shamanic practitioners and many other names and paths. Within Circle Sanctuary we come together with a common intention to honor the Divine in Nature and create community together. Our membership program continues this tradition of honoring the diversity.”

Organizers were also quick to add, “Circle Sanctuary will continue to serve Pagans of many paths and places, regardless of membership.” Their events, such as Pagan Spirit Gathering, will continue to be open to everyone. Details on joining and on other Circle programs can be found online.

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trothAfter the Jan 10 posting of controversial statements by Asatru Folk Assembly’s Steve McNallen, a wave of backlash and debate erupted throughout the Heathen world. As we previously reported, Heathens United Against Racism publicly responded with a strong response to McNallen’s comments. And, since early January the issue has not abated, with many Heathens adding to the growing public discussion on racism and the support of fascism within their religious communities.

More recently, on Jan 30, Troth Steersman Steve T. Abell posted a response to the situation on Patheos’ Agora, saying, “We have some colorful characters in the Heathen community.” The article, which calls out several members of the Heathen community by name, set off another round of arguments and more backlash. In response, The Troth as an organization posted a reaffirmation of its mission statement, and Redesman John T Mainer published an official response in an essay titled, “The High Cost of Rhetoric.”

Since that point, Heathens and Pagans alike have been weighing in on the volatile situation, including long time Troth member Diana Paxson. Speaking only for herself, Paxson wrote in a Facebook post, “Heathens are known for the variety and vividness of our opinions, and even those who are members of the Troth do not always agree. But the policies of the organization reflect the will of its members. […] If the Troth is to continue to support toleration and respect for all, all those who oppose racism need to stick with the organization and make their opinions known.”

The conversation is ongoing with many Heathens and others sharing stories and opinions on both McNallen’s original post and the follow-up response by various Troth members. How and if this will affect The Troth as an organization or the Heathen community as a whole is still unknown.

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ArcanaThe Academy of Arcana‘s museum containing “Morning Glory’s 40 year collection of Goddess Statues” is now officially opened. The Museum of Myth, Magick & Mysterie, as it has been named, held its grand opening Feb. 7 at 3:00 pm. Attendees were able to look at 366 goddess statues collected by Morning Glory over the years.

The ribbon cutting event was hosted by curator Oberon Zell and coordinator Anne Duthers, and was followed by a reception and guest presentation by Witch Elder Dr. Zsuzsanna E Budapest on “The Politics of Women’s Myths.” The academy, along with its curio shop and museum, are located at 428-A Front St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060. It is the “first physical campus for the Grey School of Wizardry, offering an educational center with a Museum of Myth, Magick and Mysterie, and a Library of Esoterica.”

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Ägyptischer_Maler_um_1360_v._Chr._001We are currently researching a breaking story in which a Pagan Facebook group was shut down because it “violated community standards.” The group’s name is “Following Isis” and was created for those people who are devotees of the Egyptian goddess. As we have reported in the past, it is not uncommon for the goddess Isis to be confused with Daesh, the terrorist organization more typically referred to as ISIS. We are currently in touch with the Facebook group owners and will follow up as we learn more.

In Other News

  • The Adocentyn Research Library, located in California, has been quietly building its collection over the past few years and is now up to 13,000 volumes. Its goal is to become the “premier Pagan research center in the Western US.” The library is managed by a non-profit organization and relies on donations of both money and materials. The management team recently launched a GoFundMe campaign to raise more awareness and funds toward the goal of finally opening its doors. Over the weekend, The New Alexandrian Library, a corresponding entity located on the East Coast, donated $250 to the cause with the words “in unity and support of the great work for the community.”
  • PantheaCon gets underway this Friday in San Jose, California. If you are attending, don’t forget to come out and meet The Wild Hunt writers on Saturday, from 5-6 p.m. in the Hexenfest Suite. We look forward to seeing old friends and meeting new people.
  • Speaking of PantheaCon, the Mills College Pagan Alliance met its fundraising goal in just 6 days and will be able to attend PantheaCon after all. Kristen Oliver called it “a blessing” and said that the group of women attending were extremely thankful for the support.
  • As Valentine’s Day nears, the Huffington Post decided to look into the meaning of Pagan handfastings.The article, titled “Here’s Why Couples Tie Their Hands Together During Pagan Weddings,” contains quotes and photos from both Circle Sanctuary’s Rev. Selena Fox and New York-based Witch Courtney Weber. Fox is quoted as saying, “In many ceremonies, the couple faces each associated direction as I do the blessing, concluding with being at the altar for the blessing of Spirit.” And, Weber, who shared photos from her own recent handfasting, said, “The use of the elementals encourages a balanced, healthy relationship […] When all parts are working together — earth, air, fire, water, and spirit — they created [sic] a holistic world that allows the couple to breathe, move, function and grow together.”
  • Dr. Ruth Lindley, a UK-based historian is looking to interview “women whose spiritual practices focus on, or relate to, ‘the Goddess’, for [her] PhD research on religion and spirituality.”  As posted on the blog Medusa’s Coils, Dr. Lindley, Ph.D, of the Department of History, University of Birmingham said, “[My] will challenge current scholarship on religious change in modern Britain, especially in relation to women’s experiences of faith from the 1960s to the present day.”  She is specifically “looking for participants based in England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.” To get involved, contact her directly at RML033@bham.ac.uk.
  • The Glastonbury Goddess Temple, which was featured in our report on the legality of handfastings in England, launched a new website for its 21st annual Goddess Festival. The summer event will “honour Goddess as Lady of Avalon, Nolava of the Sacred Land,” and will take place from July 26 to 31. Included in the festival’s activities are presentations, workshops and performances by many speakers, artists, and musicians, including “Starhawk, Carolyn Hillyer, ALisa Starweather, Rith Barrett, Jana Runnalls, Kathy Jones, Kellianna, Katinka Soetens, Luciana Percovich, Lydia Ruyle, and Falcon River”  More information is available at the Temple’s new website.

[Unleash the Hounds is a monthly feature that highlights media stories of interest originating predominantly outside of our collective communities. If you like seeing this roundup every month, consider donating to our Wild Hunt Fall Fund Drive today. Only a few hours left in the 2015 campaign! Join the team of supporters. Donate today and help keep The Wild Hunt on track for another year. Thank You.]

By Enoc vt (File:Botón Me gusta.svg)

According to a number of news sites, Facebook announced Friday that it is making changes to its infamous “real name policy.” Last year, this policy triggered a number of protests after it was used to target various communities, most visibly the LGBTQ and Indigenous populations. As we have previously reported, many Pagans, Heathens and Polytheists have also been targets of “real name policy” enforcement.

The reported announcement came in the form of a letter written in response to the most recent protest. On October 5, the Electronic Frontier Foundation published its own open letter, speaking out against the policy and asking Facebook to respond by Oct 31. The open letter was signed by a number of organizations and individuals from around the world, including the ACLU, #MyNameIs Campaign, Transgender Law Center, Women, Action &  the Media and more. The EFF open letter reads in part, “Facebook maintains a system that disregards the circumstances of users in countries with low levels of internet penetration, exposes its users to danger, disrespects the identities of its users, and curtails free speech.

In response, Facebook’s Vice President of Growth Alex Schultz reportedly responded with his own letter announcing the changes. According to that document, the policy itself will remain intact; however, beginning in December, Facebook will allow people to submit descriptive reasoning for a name choice along with their non-government issued IDs. Similarly, anyone who flags a person’s name will be required to submit detailed reasoning and proof.

Schultz explains that “bullying, harassment or other abuse on Facebook is eight times more likely to be committed by people using names other than their own than by the rest of the Facebook community.” However, he acknowledged that the policy, as it stands, does not work for everyone. Along with other tweaks to the system, they hope to make the process easier and “more personal.”  This is good news for Pagans, Heathens and Polytheists who use their public Craft names on the social media site.

Schultz letter was posted online by BuzzFeed reporter and can be read in full there. Despite the news reports, no formal announcements seem to have been made via Facebook’s press sources or on its own social media.

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In Other News ….

  • As reported by the Huffington Post, the U.S. Military has refused to remove a sign reading “God Bless” from a base in Hawaii. The sign was originally erected on the Oahu base “in response to the Sept 11 terrorist attacks.” However, in recent months, the Military Religious Freedom Foundation has gotten involve in protesting the sign and has requested its removal. In response, Col. Sean C. Killeen said the sign will remain in place and will not be altered in anyway. He added, “This sign has the secular purpose of conveying a message of support, does not advance or inhibit religion or any particular faith, nor does it foster excessive government entanglement with religion.” MRFF, undaunted by the response, fired back requesting that, to remain within the parameters set by the Constitution, the base now needs to erect similar signs representing other beliefs, specifically including Judaism, Islam, Norse Religious Faiths, Wicca, Humanism/Atheism, and Hindu. Later the MRFF, calling the Killeen’s response “massively unconstitutional,” added three more belief systems: the Baha’i faith, the Jedi church and the Church of Satan.
  • In Colorado, one Pastor is attempting to combat religious bigotry with simple education. In an article for the local Mountain-Ear, Pastor Hansen Wendlandt explains the importance of religious literacy. He writes, “America is still a very religious country. By all measures, we are full of people who believe in God, gods and goddesses, or at least something sacred about the world. And by all accounts, very many of us behave and make civil decisions based on our religious commitments. And yet, according to the careful research, Americans are woefully ignorant of each other’s faith systems and traditions.” He is using his Community Church as a forum to teach young people, mostly teenagers, about different religions. Oct 18 marked the first session, in which he invited a Hindu speaker. In Nov, Pastor Wendlandt will welcome a Wiccan speaker; then in Dec, he will bring in a Jewish speaker, following in January, by a Buddhist. He writes, “Future dates for Islam, Catholicism, Mormonism and Humanism will be announced later.”
  • While the mainstream media continued its October quest to interview witches, a town in Italy is discussing the forgiving of one. In the town of Brentonico, Mayor Christian Perenzoni is seeking the pardon of a woman who was labeled a witch and killed 300 years ago. He told The Independent, “We wanted to render justice and historical truth, and give back the condemned woman her ethical, moral and civil dignity.” According to the report, Maria Bertoletti Toldini was accused of practicing Witchcraft since the age of 13. She was eventually tried, beheaded and burned. Her trial is considered to be one the last in a long line of Witchcraft executions in the area.
  • With everyone’s mind on Halloween, a local CBS affiliate in Minnesota reported on the “Witch Tree.” The report explains, “The solitary tree … has long been growing out of a rock on tribal land along the rugged shoreline of Lake Superior.” Local indigenous groups consider the tree sacred and leave offerings at its base. The article goes on to talk about the rituals and its honored place in that culture.
  • Contributing to the month’s trending religious discussions, The Week‘s Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry asks, “Could paganism make a comeback?” Note that in this article he is defining “paganism” as that which was practiced in the classical period, as he understands it.
  • In the art world, the Deitch Project presented an exhibition, “Cameron: Cinderella of the Wastelands,” which shared the Uncensored Story of LA Artist/Occultist Majorie Cameron.” According to an article in The Observer, “Close friends … gathered to share memories of the ‘Scarlet Woman’ who starred in Kenneth Anger films and was married to rocket scientist Jack Parsons, amid a small but historic first East Coast survey of her artwork.” Her religious beliefs were integrated into her work, and she was reportedly practicing at the convergence of three traditions: Wicca, Thelema, Scientology. According to the Deitch Project website, “The combination of Cameron’s precise line, her visionary imagery, occult practice, and charismatic personality created a singular aesthetic. Her distinctive vision and her strong feminist spirit are now inspiring a new generation of artists.” Examples of her work are on the Deitch website and in the Oberserver article.

That is it for now! Have a nice day.

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WILMINGTON, Delaware — It was over within minutes. That’s Annene Burgos’ recollection of how quickly her most popular Facebook pages, with more than 33,000 likes combined, slipped through her fingers. She had simply followed instructions received in a message on the site. That message, which appeared to come from Facebook itself, had warned Burgos that her most popular page, The Power of 3, had been flagged as fraudulent. It included the steps to take in order to verify that it was a legitimate, human-run page. The name of the page proved eerily prophetic. After following the steps and entering her credentials, Burgos soon found that she had lost control of three of her most popular pages.

power of 3

“I’m very leery of scams, hackers, and all kinds of stuff like that,” Burgos said. “I’m not going to be stupid enough to just click a link and follow it.” But she was convinced that this message was from a Facebook employee, and opted to trust the instructions.

The three people listed as the page owners soon found that they had also been removed, as had the three administrators. On the pages themselves, which included The Power of 3, WOMAN TO WOMAN: Our First Amendment right to Bitch and Tormented and Crazy as F*ck 2 Resurrected, a series of malicious click-bait links started appearing in lockstep, attempting to draw in the many followers and get them to engage.

Burgos got a security message advising that there had been an attempt to log in to her account from Virginia, and quickly changed her password. She saved her private account, but her pages were not so lucky.

On one level, this is a cautionary tale about hackers who have become exceedingly sophisticated in their attempts to capitalize on the success of hard-working, honest users. Burgos, who also goes by Rhiannon, said that she has spent years building up a following for her pages only to have it all taken away.

The hackers were selective in what they took. Burgos manages a number of other pages. Unlike the stolen pages, the others have likes only in the hundreds or low thousands, and were apparently not worth taking.

For nearly a week now, the three hacked pages have been pumping out spam links to all of Burgos’ followers, who may have been taken in by the source and clicked on them. Doing so would only lead them on their own journey into the world of virtual victimhood. The fact that her pages have largely Pagan audiences may have heightened that risk. Some users place a higher level of faith in links that appear to be shared within one’s own faith community.

But this isn’t just a story about Facebook users being inattentive, gullible, or too trusting. While the social media giant itself may not have been complicit in the events that led to Burgos and her co-admins losing control of the pages, Facebook has demonstrated a lack of responsiveness once the situation was reported. “Myself and the other admins, and a lot of other people, reported the pages repeatedly,” she said, but for nearly a week, the lack of a response earned a big, fat “dislike” from them. “I even wrote on Mark Zuckerberg’s page, saying that these pages had been hacked and were now posting spam. I asked him to get me the pages back, or at least take them down. I didn’t expect him to answer,” but out of desperation, she tried anyway.

Burgos also made the futile attempt of warning her former fans by posting on the hacked pages and commenting on the suspicious links. She warned people not to click and encouraged them to report the pages themselves. She gave up that effort because she couldn’t keep up, and it wasn’t clear if it was helping turn the tide anyway.

This image was reported as including nudity, and Facebook apparently agreed.

This image was reported as including nudity, and Facebook apparently agreed.

Meanwhile, Burgos and her associates were experiencing what may well have been other effects of the hacking, although it’s not really clear. After she received the notification of the login attempt from another state, Burgos started receiving friend requests from a particular character. “They were random requests from people with one friend,” she recalled. “I don’t know if they were the hackers, but I thought it was weird and denied them all.”

A few days later July 11, Burgos was automatically logged out of her account and advised that she needed to address a problem with an image that she had posted. Although it depicted a fully-clothed woman, the graphic had been reportedly flagged for nudity. While an automatic flagging system might not be expected to know the difference between clothing and skin, Burgos was advised that the image was deemed a violation of Facebook’s terms and would be removed. The image, first posted on July 7, has not yet been removed as of this writing.

The two people who shared ownership in the three hacked pages also found themselves facing similar accusations. They quickly realized that the image flagging all took place within the space of one hour.

“All of our profiles are private, so only our friends can see the pictures,” Burgos said. “I figured that it must have been a mutual friend who did it,” but her investigation showed that they didn’t actually have any friends in common among all three of them, resulting in another dead end.

The Wild Hunt did attempt to contact a Facebook staffer who had been responsive in the past, but discovered that she is no longer with the company. And, her replacement did not respond to our numerous voice and emails seeking comment. If he had done so, we would have asked for ways that Facebook users can remain vigilant against hackers who are becoming increasingly crafty, and what measures Facebook itself is taking to address these concerns.

Regarding both the lack of a human response to Burgos and the odd response to the flagging of non-nude images, Facebook was asked in our email if and when the company actually expects human beings to evaluate these situations. Shortly after the attempt to contact Facebook, all three of the pages were removed from public view. It’s not known if the timing of this action was a coincidence or was precipitated by the contact attempts.

Facebook has a longstanding reputation of avoiding any sort of human-based customer service, a situation which stymied Herman Mehta, the so-called Friendly Atheist, when his own page was hacked. Mehta may have cracked the near-impenetrable Facebook fortress, because it appears he has had his page restored, but he apparently has certain advantages. He wrote:

I got mine back because a friend of a friend knew someone at Facebook who could fast-track it back into my hands. Sneaky option: Tell Facebook you want to buy advertising, [a]nd then say you would buy it but someone got ahold of your page. Can’t promise it’ll help, but they’re much more likely to help you if they think you’ll give them money.  Also, you’ll get to talk to a human.

Security vulnerabilities at Facebook made worldwide headlines in 2013, when a Palestinian researcher hacked Mark Zuckerberg’s own page in a last-ditch attempt to notify the company about a security flaw. That particular hole was apparently plugged, but it seems new leaks continuing to spring up, and the company has beefed up neither security nor customer service sufficiently to respond.

Burgos has started new versions of several pages, with The POWER of 3 -pagan path already having gathered more than 1,300 likes as of this writing. But that is still less than 10% of the old page’s following.

As of this morning July 15, Burgos reported that all three of her former pages were live again, with fresh new inappropriate content. Followers of those pages have already been expressing outrage, and Burgos is hoping that no one will fall prey to what are likely malicious links posted at The POWER of 3, Tormented and Crazy as F*ck 2 Resurrected, and WOMAN TO WOMAN: Our First Amendment right to Bitch, all of which are offering identical — and clearly inappropriate — content.

“I just want my story to warn people,” said Burgos. “I know that there are people whose livelihoods come from selling through Facebook, and I can’t imagine how something like this would affect them.”

[Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. Our hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!]

justice graphicOn Dec. 4, Crystal Blanton, Wild Hunt columnist, Priestess, writer, and long-time activist, issued a challenge to the collective Pagan communities, saying “This is an opportunity to stand up and support the people of color within the Pagan community, and society, by saying… we see you. We are not ignoring you, we are not staying silent.” Over the past four days, a growing number of individuals, groups and organizations have responded by publishing statements of solidarity, open letters and personal blog posts.

The Wild Hunt will be covering this story in detail in the coming week as others organizations and individuals are currently finalizing their own words. Some of statements already published include those by Starhawk, T. Thorn Coyle, Pantheon Foundation, CAYA covenSolar Cross, Ár nDraíocht Féin, and more. Stay tuned for more on this subject.

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The New Alexandrian Library announced that it has received its certificate of occupancy. The statement read, in part, “This means we are now ready to do the final walkthrough with the contractor; to begin the process of moving in shelves, furniture, books and artwork; and to think about a grand opening. We want to thank everyone who worked so hard and so long to make this dream a reality, who believed that the ASW could create such a resource for the Magickal Community.”

Additionally, the library has launched a new fundraising campaign for its 2015 Gala to be held at Sacred Space on Mar. 7 at the Hunt Valley Inn in Maryland.

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The Druid NetworkThe Druid Network announced that it has compiled and recreated the shared liturgy of the now closed Solitary Druid Fellowship (SDF). Shut down in September, SDF was an experimental project for solitary Druids and an extension of Ár nDraíocht Féin (ADF). As explained on the Druid Network website, “The Fellowship provided free liturgies for each of the Eight High Days of the Pagan Wheel of the Year, each based on ADF’s Core Order of Ritual.”

In the spirit of digital archiving and preserving important work, members of The Druid Network have uploaded all of these liturgies in one location for easy download. Organizers said, “It was such an excellent resource – not only for ADF druids – but for the whole community.” They also added that, if SDF should re-emerge, they will be happy to pass on the files to the new founders.

In Other News:

  • Over the past two weeks, Facebook has shut down several Pagan accounts as part of the enforcement of its “real name policy.” A number of people were targeted in this sweep, including authors Raven Grimassi and Storm Constantine. Speculation continues as to how and why this happens.
  • Cherry Hill Seminary has announced the opening of registration for spring classes. This registration is for both the masters courses toward a degree, as well as they four-week insight classes for non-seminary students.
  • Rootworker and Orisha Priest Lou Florez will be taking a pilgrimage to Nigeria. In an interview with Erick DuPree, Florez said, “…an invitation has been extended to travel to Nigeria in February with an esteemed elder and teacher, and to take the high priesthood initiation in IFA, the root of all Orisha religions. In addition to receiving this once-in-a-lifetime spiritual elevation, I will also train in traditional medicine making, and herbalism from elder priestesses and priests.” Florez has started a fundraising campaign to help fund the trip.
  • The deadline for submission to Paganicon 5 and Twin Cities Pagan Pride annual Third Offering sacred art exhibition is drawing near. As organizers explain, “Inspired to gather and create beauty as our third offering to our Gods and our community, this exhibition welcomes all types of visual media by artists who are capable of expressing a Pagan or polytheistic aesthetic.” The deadline is Jan. 1. The exhibition will be held at Paganicon, Mar.13-15.
  • Tea & Chanting Sangha is “is doing 100,000 recitations of OM MANI PADME HUM to create healing and change regarding police brutality:” The organization “integrates Pagan and Tibetan Buddhist practices.” Throughout the month, organizers will tally the number of recitations, whether recited together or individually. They encourage people to participate or join them on line. As of Dec. 7, they have done 13,075 recitations.

That’s it for now. Have a nice day!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. Our hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!  

ByeHWwyIEAALsmvIn recent weeks, we reported on the Facebook name controversy that hit the drag queen community in September.  The issue highlighted a problem with the social media giant’s name policy – one that that could affect anyone who uses a non-legal name. Despite the company’s Oct 2 apology, accounts continue to be frozen. Over the last two weeks, Pagans have joined the ranks of people who have been adversely affected.

Author Silver Ravenwolf ‘s personal account has been flagged and she is now forced to use her legal name. On her public author page, she wrote, “FaceBook is going through and telling magickal people that their pages with friends are not legit because they are not using their legal names. This is causing great harm to our community.”  Ravenwolf is asking that anyone who uses a non-legal name to unlike her fan page or unfriend her. She is worried that her connections will be used to flag others. She also encourages people to sign a Change.Org petition.

Another person affected was Storm Faerywolf. He told The Wild Hunt:

I choose to use the name Storm Faerywolf publicly as both a magical and political act; magical, because it reminds me that I have chosen to be an open resource for the Craft, and political because it is my work to help others to live a magical life. Being forced to use only the name on my official ID interferes with my ability to freely express myself and my work.

Storm contacted Facebook immediately but has received no response. He also contacted Sister Roma, who is currently acting as a liaison for anyone dealing with this problem. Since making that contact, he has been informed that his account will be fixed within the next 48 hours but he’s not holding his breath.

According to various reports, the Facebook controversy has not only affected drag queens and Pagans, but has also hit the Native American community.  Sister Roma told the Guardian that “every time one or two get fixed, a handful get suspended … So we really feel like we’re swimming upstream, and while I’m hopeful that Facebook is doing the right thing, it’s discouraging.”

For anyone who has been affected by this ongoing problem, LilHotMess, one of the activists working with Sister Roma, has extended her offer to help restore accounts.  The instructions on how to reach her are listed here.

Courtney Weber of the Pagan Environmental Coalition of New York

Courtney Weber of the Pagan Environmental Coalition of New York

In other news:

That is all we have for now.  Have a great day.

[Crystal Blanton is one of our talented monthly columnists. If you like her work and want to support her writing here at The Wild Hunt, please consider donating to our fall funding drive and sharing our IndieGoGo link. It is your continued support that had made it possible for us to feature Crystal and her insightful column, Culture and Community, each month. Will you donate now? Thank you.]

Facebook’s “real name” policy has caused a recent storm of responses from many social media consumers, increasing the number of people who have started the process in taking their social media loyalty someplace else. The resulting controversy and consumer response to the deactivation of accounts under this policy have caused many people to question staying on a social media platform that does not appear to care about the needs of its consumers.

As The Wild Hunt reported on Wednesday, Facebook recently issued an apology, specifically to the LGTBQ community, about the way that the policy was enforced this past month. While Facebook said that the policy will remain in effect, they also said that they are re-evaluating the way that the name policy is enforced because it disproportionately affects those from the drag queen, transgender and LGBTQ communities.

[Photo Credit: Emily Rose / Tako Fibers, Flickr]

[Photo Credit: Emily Rose / Tako Fibers, Flickr]

For some people using a real name does not pose the same problem as it does for others. This issue has highlighted some of the safety risks and challenges that the social media world poses to different people. Whether due to personal preference, performing with a different persona, taking protective measures for marginalized communities, or the safeguarding one’s personal life for professional reasons, there are a lot of circumstances in which a person might use a pseudonym on social media.

Pagans are among some of the marginalized groups that utilize alternative names on social media. Sometimes this is a protection mechanism from judgment that would affect their ability to thrive in their physical community and sometimes this is a spiritual choice. The change in the name policy and the enforcement of this policy could have a big impact on the Pagan community and others.

The responses within the Pagan community to Facebook’s “real name” policy and the subsequent apology has been quite varied. It has ranged from people completely leaving Facebook and transitioning to other social media outlets, like Ello or Sgrouples, to being resistant to a social media switch.

Author and Activist T Thorn Coyle has been one of the Pagans speaking out and actively transitioning her personal social media needs away from Facebook. She said:

T. Thorn Coyle

T. Thorn Coyle

Facebook has never been a good fit for me. While I appreciate the conversations I have with people on my public page, the way the private pages are used has never appealed. Also, in the last couple of years Facebook has made it very difficult for grassroots organizations and independent artists, musicians, and authors to reach the very people who want to hear from them. The shifting algorithm and the push to pay for “views” to people who have already signed up for public pages has made it an increasingly less useful tool.

The controversy over the “real name” policy looked like a great opportunity to finally make the transition away. I already use Twitter far more than Facebook – keeping in touch with on the ground activists around the world, and with thinkers I don’t otherwise have exposure to – and I am liking Ello even in beta form.

Facebook made all the right noises regarding their meeting with the drag queens, but frankly, that was only after the exodus began. When 40,000 people swamped Ello in one week, Facebook took notice. Facebook had already met with the queens earlier and discounted their concerns. The turnaround came after concrete action was taken.

I don’t trust Facebook to do the right thing, and never have. I don’t think they care about the concerns of people who have very good reasons to not use legal names whether it is from religious choice, self-expression, shift in identity, or because of personal safety issues. What Facebook cares about is money and information exploitation. Making money is fine, but not at the expense of the well being of the people who provide you with the means.

Facebook is a tool that I will still use – my public page has around 5,700 people – but I’m quite happy to be shutting down my private page.

Elizabeth Rose, a social worker that deals in clinical services, mentioned the complexities of this professional field and the challenge of choosing a name on social media profiles. There are professional reasons within certain fields, and in conjunction with being a Pagan that makes this process more complicated than just using your “real name.”

Elizabeth Rose

Elizabeth Rose

I think there are two main points to be made: 1. Many workplaces have a “no Facebook policy.” Mine did not, however it did have a policy, however “unofficial”, of not being critical of the institution. I’m a social worker. As much as I like the population I work with, and I’m grateful to my workplace for giving me a job and for existing, I was trained to criticize the institution. That is to say I was trying to analyze where systems fail, and what to do about it. Trust me, large bureaucracies don’t want you expressing this to them or to anyone else.

2. My life is my business. Particularly as a Pagan, who works with a population that contains a lot of evangelical Christians, I have no desire to be subject to personal criticism, nor do I wish my life and or my religious beliefs to be an issue for my patients. I’m there to facilitate THEIR healing process, neither to discuss nor to defend my personal religious beliefs, which would be a major distraction from this process. In fact knowing I was Pagan would probably inhibit, if not actually frighten, a number of my clients to the point where they felt they couldn’t trust me with their personal information. As a therapist creating a sense of safety and my clients is paramount. I have no intention of letting any poorly thought out or invasive policy threaten that. A pseudonym addresses this issue very effectively. And I have no intention of using my “real name”. In fact, I’m thinking of de-camping to Ello for this very reason.

Sister Krissy

Sister Krissy

Sister Krissy Fiction is a queer Gnostic Pagan drag clown nun, a fully professed Sister of Perpetual Indulgence and the Prioress of the Order of Benevolent Bliss in Portland, OR. She previously was quoted in the Wild Hunt piece on the Facebook chaos this past week. In her interview with Heather Greene, she discussed feelings about the apology:

I do believe that Facebook’s apology was sincere.  I’m not sure if the apology was offered as a result of activists taking action against Facebook or because members were flocking to other social media platforms, but I do appreciate and accept the apology.  However, as they say, the proof is in the pudding.  I appreciate the apology, but I’ll appreciate some real changes even more.  I’m hopeful that Facebook will do the right thing.

Other community responses gave insights into personal agency to identify as one chooses and the spiritual impact of not being able to use a spiritual name in social media.

Stephanie Kjer

Stephanie Kjer

There are a lot of problems with a “real name” policy in Social Media, not the least of which is safety – many people in the Pagan Community, and other marginalized communities, adopt pseudonyms for a myriad of different reasons, not the least of which is safety or concern about how people in their family or professional life might feel about their affiliations, and how that could affect job opportunities, advancement, family interactions, etc… While I don’t think that real name policies are intended to be harmful, I definitely think it’s coming from a place of privilege and ignorance about how other people may find it necessary to keep parts of their lives separate or private from each other. Additionally, in a lot of traditions, it’s quite common for someone to adopt a name that has personal significance for them, and their interactions with the gods. One might even call it on par with a marriage or baptism, whereby someone takes a name as a sign of devotion or of a higher calling, and even though that is not the name they were born with or legally assigned, it is WHO THEY ARE, and denying people the right to choose for themselves who they want to be in their interactions is an act of forcing them to deny themselves and their connection to their spirituality. I also believe that a real name policy is invasive and seems more about profiting on data mining rather than a genuine intent to enable honest interactions between the users of a social platform. People can be disingenuous using their real name just as much as they can with a pseudonym.

I am open to exploring different ways to connect with people, and a requirement of real name is not a deal breaker for me, per se. I’m more interested in whatever platform allows me to interact freely with the people who matter the most to me. I do find the idea of being data mined to be a bit repugnant, and so a media platform that values my privacy but that still fulfills my desire to connect with people would be ideal. – Stephanie Kjer, Priestess and Advocate

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Yeshe Rabbit

If Facebook requires me to use my legal name, I will likely leave altogether. Now, there is nothing wrong with my legal name, Jessica Matthews Robles, nor is there anything wrong with people knowing it, on my part. However, when I made my formal commitment to Paganism and the host of spiritual practices that came along with it, one of those practices was the taking of a new name. The name Rabbit symbolizes my connection to the Earth and the Mother Goddess, my choice to be a healer, my lunar practices, my playfulness, and humor. I took this name because I meant it. I use this name every day in all areas of my life, and each time I see or hear it, I am reminded of my commitment to walk this Earth-based, Goddess-centered path. I do not think it is appropriate for Facebook to attempt to set my priorities for me. I know who I am and why I chose the name I chose. That ought to be enough.

I have largely stepped back from Facebook for several reasons. 1) a personal reason: because of the commercialism and spamming that I am experiencing there. I do not like all of the ads and assorted game requests, for starters. But also, 2) a political reason: I have noticed many articles about Facebook’s violation of peoples’ privacy, manipulation of emotions, and other general creepiness. That’s not right. So, while I really value the connections I have made with some good people on Facebook, the environment is no longer to my liking. In switching to other sites, I am stepping into a new teahouse, so to speak. I figure that those of us who were in our discussions in one teahouse will eventually encounter one another in similar discussions in a new teahouse. Because we are in love with tea and discussions.  – Yeshe Rabbit

The recent Facebook apology has brought about much discussion and question of Facebook’s intentions, and it appears that there are a lot more communities that have also been affected who were not included in their apology. Pagans and members of other marginalized groups, are continuing to surface and talk about being forced to change their name or lose their accounts. And while Facebook is not changing the policy itself, the understanding and enforcement of the policy, it appears, suggests a larger problem than one created with just one social media giant.

The changing trend within today’s functioning society includes the use of social media profiles as a means of conducting business, engaging socially, connecting with family and even participating with society on multiple levels. In today’s electronically driven culture, decisions around the use of social media are as important as the communities with which we choose to engage and the friends with whom we decide to build relationships. The power of personal choice and agency in the world of social media is as important as our choices in the use of any other tool for life; the importance of the power to choose is not lessened by the fact that it is an online format.

While trust in Facebook’s policies and intentions continues to be of question, the reality is that this situation has pushed some people to move towards a more consumer driven social platform. And maybe it is time to really ask ourselves what we want from social media, and how this can be used to serve the Pagan communities in the future.

Early in September, a large number of people received notification that their Facebook accounts were in violation of company policy. These advisories explained that all users are required to register with their authentic names. Because the majority of flagged accounts belonged to drag queens, there was an immediate outcry based on the assumption that Facebook was deliberately targeting the LGBTQ community. That outcry led to action, and the action led to results.

In response to the initial warnings, affected users such as Sister Roma, Lil Miss Hot Mess, Heklina, and others living in the San Francisco Bay area, immediately spoke out via Twitter, radio shows and other venues. They accused Facebook of discriminatory practices. Sister Roma, a performer, activist and longtime member of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, led the charge. In a tweet on Sept. 11, she said:

Sister Roma’s tweet was the catalyst for the hashtag campaign #MyNameIs, which was quickly picked up by other affected Facebook users and, subsequently, printed on purple signs and logos. A live protest at Facebook headquarters was planned for Sept. 16.

However, the protest was canceled when Facebook called a meeting with the activists. On Wed Sept. 17, Sister Roma, Lil Miss Hot Mess and others met with Facebook representatives who explained the reason for the name policy. They gave all the flagged users an extra two weeks to create profiles with their legal names.

By this point news was spreading beyond those directly affected. As that happened, Facebook users, including many Pagans and Heathens, began looking for alternative social media platforms. Many worried that Facebook was stepping up enforcement of its name policy. Like drag queens, many Pagans and Heathens use adopted names corresponding to their chosen identity. The rumored “crack down” could have significant repercussions on the well-being of many social and cultural groups. Sister Krissy Fiction, a Gnostic Pagan and Prioress of the Portland Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, told The Wild Hunt

This is really about much more than just drag queens.There are lots of valid reasons why people might not want to use their legal name on Facebook. While we’ve gained a lot of ground, there are still those in the LGBT community who can’t be fully open about their sexual orientation. They risk losing family relationships and jobs. In the Trans* community, sometimes a legal name might not match their current gender identity or how most people know them. Do we really want to out Trans* people by forcing them to use a name that belongs to a gender they don’t identify with?  

In the meantime, the #MyNameIs campaign was bolstered by the Facebook meeting. A new protest was scheduled for Oct. 2 on the steps of San Francisco’s city hall. One affected user, Mike Woolson or Unkle Mikey, designed this graphic to illustrate clearly that the name policy doesn’t only burden the LGBTQ community.

image2

Facebook’s insistence on maintaining a name policy is encased in very real concerns that fake identities facilitate abusive acts (e.g., cyber-stalking, trolling) and could possibly foster other destructive social or criminal behaviors (e.g., bullying, stalking, domestic violence, terrorism) by masking the real identity of those that commit the acts. It is more difficult for authorities to identify or track an abuser, troll or terrorist, who uses an online pseudonym. However, as illustrated in the above graphic, the same mask that protects the criminal also protects the victim or the potential victim.

Sister Krissy did not have her page removed. She was already using her legal name on Facebook, only partially due to the policy. Sister Krissy is one of the lucky ones who does not worry about the public exposure of both identities. But that level of comfort doesn’t exist for everyone, including many practitioners of alternative religions.

Sister Krissy Fiction [Courtesy Photo]

Sister Krissy Fiction [Courtesy Photo]


Should it matter if the adorned name is for personal protection, artistic expression or sacred purposes? Sister Krissy said:

There is a long tradition of using chosen names within our [Pagan] communities.That exists partly to help protect from possible discrimination, but also because we recognize that there is power in chosen names and we value being able to decide what image we are going to present to the world. The reality is though, that if Facebook doesn’t change the policy, we run the same risk of one individual fueled by spite being able to shut down hundreds of profiles. Sure, this time around it was drag queens and Sisters, but it could have just as easily been someone who doesn’t like Pagans who decided to go on a reporting spree. 

Two weeks after the initial meeting, Facebook called a second one. Sister Roma tweeted, “Off to @facebook representing the millions of users with chosen and protective names – your voice will be heard.”

At that Oct. 1 meeting, Facebook Chief Products Officer Christopher Cox formally apologized to the coalition of activists and the represented communities. In a press release, Cox explained that the company was not at all targeting drag queens. The accounts were flagged only after someone complained. Additionally, he stated, “Our policy has never been to require everyone on Facebook to use their legal name. The spirit of our policy is that everyone on Facebook uses the authentic name they use in real life. For Sister Roma that’s Sister Roma. For Lil Miss Hot Mess that’s Lil Miss Hot Mess. Part of what’s been so difficult about this conversation is that we support both of these individuals, and so many others affected by this, completely and utterly in how they use Facebook.” The response was posted on Facebook:

 

After that meeting and Cox’ public statement, the coalition of activists announced that the Oct. 2 protest would now be a #MyNameIs Victory Rally. While some have criticized Facebook for its back peddling in the wake of potentially losing customers, most people are applauding Facebook for attempting to find workable solutions that fit their security concerns and also serve the real needs of loyal users. In an Oct. 5 video interview, Sister Roma said that she was “thrilled with Facebook.”

Sister Krissy agreed, saying: “I do appreciate and accept the apology. However, as they say, the proof is in the pudding. I appreciate the apology, but I’ll appreciate some real changes even more. I’m hopeful that Facebook will do the right thing.” As critics have pointed out, the policy has yet to be changed. Facebook’s promise was only to evolve the way it enforces the policy, not to alter the policy itself. Some don’t consider this a win.

However, The Human Rights Campaign (HRC), who had representatives at the Oct. 1 meeting, suggested otherwise. It said in part:

The coalition in attendance, including HRC – which is a member of Facebook’s Network of Support team, combatting [sic] anti-LGBT bullying online – will continue to work with Facebook’s team as the policy is clarified and new measures are put into place to ensure LGBT community members can still think of Facebook as place to call home.

Despite HRC involvement and Facebook’s apparent interest in serving a diversity of populations, both revising and enforcing the policy poses complications that raise questions about self-making and identity within our culture. Facebook wants to protect its product through preventing phony user accounts employed for spamming purposes and false identities that mask criminal activity. Even if Facebook doesn’t require legal proof of identity, issues will still arise. How do you prove a legitimate, self-made identity that has no documentation? Many religious-based or Craft personas fall into that category. They can’t be proven with even unofficial documents such as junk mail or club cards.

Regardless of these sticking points, like Google before them, Facebook has now conceded that the process of defining what constitutes a “real identity” is complex and requires more than a simple algorithm or automated process. “Real identity” extends beyond the typed letters on a birth certificate or gas bill.

On Saturday, Crystal Blanton will tackle this subject. In her column “Culture and Community,” she will explore the issue as it specifically relates to Pagans and Heathens who, like drag queens, often live with multiple real identities and multiple real names.

 

This past week we witnessed a crescendo of frustration and fury fly from the global Pagan community in the direction of a Facebook Fan Page called “Witches Must Die by Fire” and a Facebook Group called “Those Witches nd Wizzards [sic] should die by Fire by Force.”  The rally cries came by way of social media, blogs and email.  At this point, I would include the links but the “pages” were removed by Facebook around 4pm EST on Thursday, August 23 2013.

FB PageThese offending Facebook “pages” advocated for the extrication and burning of alleged witches and wizards throughout the world. Using a Christian fundamentalist context, the moderators repeatedly preached their gospel on the evils of witchcraft while celebrating all attempts to defeat it.  As proof of witchcraft’s existence, the Fan Page displayed a photo of a South African-Zimbabwe sensationalist rag called H Metro Zim with a headline that read something like “Woman gives birth to frogs…daily.”

Let’s first examine the pages themselves and who owned them? The answer is important because it contextualizes the accusations and religious zealotry. The Facebook Group, “Those Witches nd Wizzards [sic] should die by Fire by Force” appears to have been launched in February of 2013.  It was moderated solely or in part by a Botswanan Pastor named Anthony Matildah, whose own personal Facebook page seems to have also disappeared. The 247 member group communicated in both broken-English and native African dialects including Setswana.  Most of its members were from the sub-Saharan countries of Africa.

The Facebook Fan Page called “Witches Must Die by Fire” was launched on April 3, 2013 by someone of sub-Saharan African-descent. However, this person confessed to “not [having] been back to Africa in 20 years.” He or she communicated in perfect British English and in at least one other African dialect. Based on my own research, I believe the owner resides in the U.K. as did the majority of the users making up the Page’s 340 likes. In recent years, Scotland Yard has in fact noticed an increase in the number of Witch Hunt cases in the UK and a noticeable growth in popularity of U.K.-based African Christian Churches. It is entirely possible that the page owner was a Pastor or, at the very least, a devout follower.

sapralogoAt first everyone assumed that the two pages had the same owner(s); however, they in fact may have no connection.  Regardless, they were certainly aligned through intent and discourse.  Both advocated for faith-based violence and, in doing so, perpetuated a culture of fear rampant in sub-Saharan Africa. Damon Leff, Director of the South African Pagan Rights Alliance (SAPRA), coordinator of the Petition to Stop WItch Hunts in South Africa and Founder of Touchstone Advocacy said:

[Witchcraft] accusations occur not only in small impoverished villages…. Accusations occur across economic and social status lines.  Accusations are frequently made by ordinary people, not necessarily Christians, and not necessarily as a result of Christian influence. Traditional African beliefs often drive accusations, where traditional healers do play their role by divining suspects of suspected witchcraft activity…No single African country has been immune to its fair share of witch-hunts. Many of these countries already have legislation that forbids accusations of witchcraft… However [this] legislation does not address or seek to correct the beliefs which motivate accusations.

As suggested by Leff and noted in a BBC article on the subject, witchcraft in these cases is defined by a supernatural practice with clear malicious intent. The beliefs are a fusion of fundamentalist Christianity and traditional African folk beliefs. Some pastors use the fear of witchcraft to extort money out of their congregation and have even convinced parents to abuse their own children. This witchcraft is a distorted product of theological extremism gone very, very wrong.

accusation

As such the witchcraft in these cases is not the same as the Witchcraft practiced within the spiritual or ethical framework of a Pagan or Nature-based religion or any other similar positive folk or healing practice. The verbal attacks made on these two Facebook pages were not anti-Pagan.  As best clarified by Circle Magazine Editor Florence Edwards-Miller, this distinction is not at all dissimilar to the Anti-Defamation League’s differentiation between anti-Semitism (a people) and anti-Judaism (a theology.) The Facebook pages attacked a people, not a theology.

However, as pointed out by Damon Leff:

Witch-hunters will never first ask if their victims are Pagan Witches before attacking, as they are unlikely to draw any distinction between one kind of witch or another, and so it is understandable that Witches everywhere should feel personally offended and threatened.

cog-joint-logoAnd, offended we were. Sometime in April “Witches and Wizzards” and “Witches Must Die By Fire,” began receiving counter posts and complaints from concerned Pagans.  However, the Fan Page went private from April to August during which interest waned.  When the Fan Page reappeared on the scene, an avalanche of protests began which included abuse complaints to Facebook, calls to media affiliates, petitions on Change.org, You Tube Videos and blog posts. Babette Petiot of “News & Liens Paienne” even contacted Interpol which is based in her home town of Lyon, France.

As word spread, Pagan organizations became involved. On August 20, Lady Liberty League issued an open letter to Facebook asking it to “revise [its] decision and disable these and all future pages calling for violent witch hunts anywhere.” On the same day, the Covenant of the Goddess responded by saying, it “cannot condone a public call for the death of any one person or group regardless of religious affiliation or lifestyle choice.”

Pagan FederationIn Russia, Pagan Federation co-coordinator Gwiddon said, “What is surprising to me is the reaction of Facebook staff that seems to be completely ignoring this issue, despite the repeated notifications from witches and pagans.” In the U.K., The Pagan Federation’s Mike Stygal agreed asking “why [should] Facebook allow pages that are clearly aimed at inciting hatred, violence and murder to continue to grace their social network?”

With 100s of complaints being turned away or ignored entirely, there was nothing to explain Facebook’s decision. On Tuesday I was able to reach Facebook’s Public Policy and Communication Department. After several exchanges, they promised to be in touch with an explanation. But the pages went down before I ever got a response. So I contacted Facebook again.  They confirmed that the pages were removed by them.  Then they offered this short explanation when I asked “What happened?”

With over one billion users worldwide, we always encourage our users to report content that they believe violates our policies here and it looks like we didn’t receive any violations [on these pages]…. It could be possible that users may have reported that they violated under different terms…”   

As the moderator of an international free-speech forum, Facebook handles two million abuse reports per week. As Emily Brazelton explains in her book Sticks and Stones, the Facebook system is mostly automated leaving reviewers only seconds to handle each complaint.  If two identical complaints are rejected, any future similar complaints are ignored. (Brazelton, Sticks and Stones, pg 268-269)

By Enoc vt (File:Botón Me gusta.svg)

By Enoc vt (File:Botón Me gusta.svg)

It may be that our voices were, at first, lost in that automated shuffle. However, in the end our mounting pressure broke through and Facebook took corrective actions to uphold its own policies. In reaction, the Covenant of the Goddess together with the Lady Liberty League responded with gratitude urging “the Pagan community to join [them] in expressing [their] thanks to Facebook for listening and making this positive change.” They added:

We hope Facebook will to continue to be a leader in the effort to address violence and hate wherever it festers.

This felt like a win for many of us who celebrated from behind our computer screens.  But was it really?  Should we even be celebrating? What are we celebrating? The notoriety of these pages took us, first world Pagans, to a place labeled “witchcraft” where our nature- spirituality, our ethics, our mythology and our beliefs intersect with something far more horrifying.  While these Facebook pages may not have been directed toward us, in viewing them we reached a point of liminality where distinctions between Witchcraft and witchcraft were no longer made.  That is scary.

Now that the pages are down, we can move beyond that surreal point back into the security of our own world. Unfortunately, the removal of these two Facebook pages created no comfort for those living in the affected regions of Africa or elsewhere. Should this week’s events be a wake-up call for Pagans and Witches worldwide to reconsider our relationship with the accused? Now that the “fire” is put out, should we re-evaluate our responsibility, as a People who claim the word Witch, to those people who are dying because of the word witch?

Never Again the Burning Times??

Courtesy of Flickr's emilydickinsonridesabmx

Courtesy of Flickr’s emilydickinsonridesabmx

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Witchesmustdie001jpg-2568309_p9Last week, several Pagans became aware of a Facebook page entitled “Witches Must Die By Fire,” and a group called “Those Witches And Wizards Must Die By Fire By Force.”  While hate speech complaints seemed to initially work, the page is back up, and Facebook is sending back an automated message saying it doesn’t violate hate speech guidelines. A number of Pagan responses have emerged from the controversy as growing numbers of our interconnected community discover the page and group. These responses include a petition, a group on Facebook dedicated to removing hate pages and groups, a call to involve Interpol, and an overview of the issue from South African Pagan Damon Leff, who notes that rhetoric about burning witches shouldn’t be taken lightly.  Quote: Throughout Africa women, men and children frequently become targets for witch-hunters. Incitement to burn Witches anywhere in Africa must be taken deadly seriously and response to such credible threats of violence against Witches on Facebook aught to be immediate and decisive.” As an Atlantic Magazine article published yesterday about Saudi Arabia’s ongoing and deadly hunt for witches and sorcerers illustrates, the global problem of witch-hunts and witch-killings are not merely idle talk, and rhetoric underlying these actions should not be simply dismissed. The Wild Hunt is currently in contact with several Pagan organizations about further responses and constructive paths forward.

The Warrior's CallA call has gone out to Pagans in the United Kingdom to participate in a public ritual at Glastonbury Tor designed to “protect Albion from Fracking.” Quote: “Albion is in peril. Her sacred sites threatened like never before. Chalice Well and the Goddess Sulis (Bath’s geothermal springs) are in danger of becoming toxic. The Great Mother’s flesh is to be cracked open and drained dry, uncaring for consequence to bird and beast, land and life. All those of good intent are summoned hither – regardless of age or gender, color or Creed – to gather at noon on Saturday the 28th of September atop Glastonbury Tor. There, we are to engage in group magickal working for the betterment and protection of this sacred landscape.” One of the co-sponsors of the ritual is Wiccan Marina Pepper, a politician and environmental activist, who has made the issue of fracking a key concern. Pepper’s concern seems well founded, as Heritage Daily has also sounded the alarm over potential damage to the famous wells of Aquae Sulis by hydraulic fracturing. As I mentioned last week, prominent UK Pagans like Damh the Bard and Philip Carr-Gomm have already been protesting fracking operations, and it seems like concern over this issue is only intensifying as Britain’s natural landscape is threatened by this process.

Peter Dybing

Peter Dybing

This past week Pagan activist Peter Dybing, a logistics specialist who works in disaster management, has been in Idaho helping to fight the wildfires raging through Sun Valley, the biggest fire in 25 years. Wildfires are currently spreading throughout the Northwest region of the United States, which has been plagued by drought and dry weather. In a missive posted to his blog, Dybing noted how his Pagan faith, and his work fighting these fires intertwine. Quote: “Today I am back from a fire, in Boise, resting, planning and preparing to respond again. As I reflect on my actions it is clear that the most profound influence my beliefs have had on me are my instinctive actions in crisis. When direct decisions are necessary NOW, they are laced with compassion, internal tears for the destruction Gaia faces in this firestorm and the need to be of service. The most profound expression of my Pagan beliefs and practice shine through most brightly when I have little time for piety.” Our prayers go out to Dybing, and all the brave first responders fighting these fires. May the rains return soon.

In Other Pagan Community News:

  • Modern Witch Magazine is now accepting submission for its fifth volume, entitled “Veils and Visions.” Quote: “The theme is centered on working with the other side, ancestors, energy work, and psychic development.” Deadline is September 25th, you can find guidelines and more information, here.
  • Water, the quarterly newsletter of the Pagan Educational Network, has just released its Lughnasadh edition. The publication is for members only, but you can get a membership subscription on a sliding scale.
  • September 27th through the 29th in Salem, Massachusetts will see the debut of “OCCULT,”“weekend long Esoteric Salon honoring, exploring and celebrating the intertwining vines which feed both Magick and Creative Art.” Co-produced by Aepril Schaile and Sarah “Jezebel” Wood the event promises to “recognize that, especially together, both Magick and Art are greater than the sum of their parts, and each in dwells the other; they are rooted together…To raise consciousness, challenging false perceptions of separation between these so-imagined opposed sorceries. With OCCULT, we seek to challenge old beliefs through the juxtaposition of beauty and magick, of art and ritual, blending the ingredients to make an event of highest harmony, a conjunctio of non-opposites.” You can see a lineup of OCCULT workshops and events, here. Artist line-up, here. Presenter bios, here. There will also be a masque.
  • This Saturday, August 24th, Friends of the Gualala River are starting a public action campaign to convince a winery to spare 154 acres of Gualala River’s redwood forest in California. Pagan author and activist Starhawk will be on hand to do a ritual that will (hopefully) turn “wine back into water.” Quote: “I’ve been working with Friends of the Gualala River and representatives from the Kashaya Pomo to help build a campaign to save an important Kashaya heritage site from being clearcut for vineyards.  Artesa, a Spanish company and the third largest wine corporation in the world, is planning this conversion.  It’s the last redwood-to-vineyard conversion planned in California, after the defeat of the huge Preservation Ranch proposal, which thankfully was defeated.”
  • Medusa Coils reports that the Lammas issue of Seasonal Salon, the online publication of the Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess International, has been released.
  • On September 22nd, the Stella Natura festival, held in Sierra Nevada’s Tahoe National Forest Desolation Wilderness will begin, and will include the Norwegian experimental runic band Wardruna in an exclusive American performance. Meanwhile, Circle Ansuz, a Heathen Anarchist collective, has begun a series of posts digging into the beliefs and past of influential Heathen Stephen McNallen, whose Asatru Folk Assembly is acting as co-sponsor for Stella Natura. I will be following this story in the coming weeks, and will update you on any responses or new information.
  • As I noted previously, the Gerald Gardner documentary “Britain’s Wicca Man,” renamed “A Very British Witchcraft,” was finally aired in the UK after being shown in a truncated version in Australia. You can see the 46-minute version of the documentary on Youtube, here (for as long as it lasts). Enjoy!

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!