(Pagan) Books To Look For: Page duBois, W.D. Wilkerson, Paul Christopher Johnson, and More!

With all apologies to Charles de Lint for borrowing his column’s title, here are some recently released and upcoming books that I think readers of The Wild Hunt will be interested in checking out. “A Million and One Gods: The Persistence of Polytheism” by Page duBois: Page duBois, Distinguished Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature at the University of California, San Diego, author of “Out of Athens: The New Ancient Greeks” has a new book coming out in June that comes to the defense of polytheism. Quote: “Many people worship not just one but many gods. Yet a relentless prejudice against polytheism denies legitimacy to some of the world’s oldest and richest religious traditions. In her examination of polytheistic cultures both ancient and contemporary–those of Greece and Rome, the Bible and the Quran, as well as modern India–Page duBois refutes the idea that the worship of multiple gods naturally evolves over time into the “higher” belief in a single deity.

The Question of Self-Publishing

In yesterday’s post, I discussed the state of the publishing industry with respect to Barnes & Noble’s recent unimpressive fiscal announcements. How would the disappearance of the last remaining large-scale, traditional bookstore affect the metaphysical book industry? After speaking with two industry experts, the answer seems conclusive. A Barnes & Noble collapse, while not at all preferable, would not permanently damage either company. Llewellyn and the Phoenix & Dragon Bookstore both maintain flexible, diverse, customer-driven business structures that are adaptable in this evolving marketplace. Will Barnes & Noble go the same way as Borders?

(Pagan) Books to Look For: Margot Adler, Eric Scott, Owen Davies, and More!

With all apologies to Charles de Lint for borrowing his column’s title, here are some recently released and upcoming books that I think readers of The Wild Hunt will be interested in checking out. “Out For Blood” by Margot Adler: In a Kindle Single released on June 10th,  Margot Adler, author of “Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshippers, and Other Pagans in America,” takes a look at the vampire, and how the monster has changed over the years to  suit our needs. Quote: “Starting as a meditation on mortality after the illness and death of her husband, Margot Adler read more than 260 vampire novels, from teen to adult, from gothic to modern, from detective to comic. She began wonder why vampires have such appeal in our society now? Why is Hollywood spending billions on vampire films and television series every year?

Guest Post: The Trials of Arthur, Revised

[The following is a guest post from CJ Stone on the newly revised Kindle edition of his book, “The Trials of Arthur,” which explores the life and work of British Druid activist Arthur Pendragon. CJ Stone is an author, columnist, and feature writer. He has written four books: “Fierce Dancing: Adventures in the Underground” (Faber & Faber 1996); “The Last of the Hippies” (Faber & Faber 1999); “Housing Benefit Hill & Other Places” (AK Press 2001); and “The Trials of Arthur” (Thorsons/Element 2003). He is currently working on his fifth.]
“The new Druids and especially those involved in direct action such as Arthur, are therefore not fringe figures with ideals and preoccupations detached from those of a wider national community, but some of the more colourful contributors to a set of arguments and activities which involves a large part of that community.” – Ronald Hutton, from the forward of “The Trials of Arthur: Revised Edition”
It was just over three years ago that Arthur Pendragon asked me if I could get our book re-printed. It had originally been published by Thorsons/Element, an imprint of HarperCollins, in 2003, but had since gone out of print.

Scarlet Imprint’s Digital Revelations

Well-respected esoteric publishers Scarlet Imprint, producers of high quality limited-edition volumes on such topics as the cult of Pomba Gira, Palo Mayombe, and magical grimoires, has announced that they are going to start releasing their titles as ebooks. “The e-book hopefully means more people will read books. That can only be a good thing. It also means that we can create affordable versions of our work so that readers can take the risk on new authors and unfamiliar subjects. You can dare to read and enrich yourself outside of your field, perhaps you haven’t encountered Pomba Gira or Palo Mayombe before, or you want to see if the poetry cuts it.