Pagan Community Notes: Awen-inscribed gravestone at Circle; Starhawk calls for action; Caroline Tully and more.

BARNEVELD, Wis. — Circle Cemetery, a national Pagan cemetery located at Circle Sanctuary, will dedicate its first Awen-inscribed veteran gravestone. In January 2017, the Awen was added to the official list of approved symbols by the U.S. Veterans Administration, joining the pentacle and Thor’s Hammer.  The upcoming memorial will be for Druid Dan Moeller, who was known as Oakbear in the Pagan community. While Moeller has the distinction of being the first to be honored with the inscribed Awen gravestone at a Pagan cemetery, he is not the first in the nation. That distinction goes to Wayne Laliberte of Texas (1954-2013), who is honored at Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery in Texas in 2017.

2017 Wild Hunt retrospective

TWH – Now that the season has turned and we are nearing the end of the 2017, we look back, one last time, to review this historic year. What happened? What didn’t happen? What events shaped our thoughts and guided our actions? In our collective worlds, both big and small, what were the major discussions?

Filmmaker James Myers wins award for Druid-themed film

SAN FRANCISCO — Filmmaker James Myers was presented with the “Excellence Narrative Film Award” at this year’s San Francisco International New Concept Film Festival for his film Awen The film is described as an inspirational short that “follows the Celtic goddess Brigit as she spreads inspiration to others.”

Myers, who is a Druid and member of Ár nDraíocht Féin: A Druid Fellowship (ADF), began his film career after spending four years in the Navy. He attended the the University of Southern Mississippi, where he majored in film and minored in theater. When he graduated, Myers went to work in the television industry. “I’ve worked for major networks like CNN, Good Morning America, ESPN, the Outdoor Channel, and Al Jazeera. I have also spent a great deal of time in local news markets as a photojournalist,” Myers told The Wild Hunt in an interview.

Pagan Community Notes: Dr. Wendy Griffin, Feri Tradition, Temple of Witchcraft, and more

COLUMBIA, S.C. – It was announced Friday that Dr. Wendy Griffin would be stepping down as Academic Dean of Cherry Hill Seminary as of Feb. 1, 2018.  She wrote, “I have had the privilege and pleasure of serving as Academic Dean of Cherry Hill Seminary and working with a group of extraordinarily committed and caring individuals. During that time, we have shaped the program academically to be ready for accreditation, and I’m proud of the work we’ve accomplished together.” Dr. Griffin took the position in 2010 with the commitment of five years. That ran over to seven years. She wrote, “I am now 76 years old and there are a few things in my life I want to attend to while I still have time, a 3rd novel to finish, climate change workshops to present, and traveling to do.”

Department of Defense adds Heathen and Pagan religions to recognized faith groups

UNITED STATES – The Department of Defense (DoD) has added several Heathen and Pagans religions to its recognized faith groups list after a multi-year effort by Heathen and Pagan religious organizations and individuals. The DoD added or updated just under 100 religions to its document: Faith and Belief Codes for Reporting Personnel Data of Service Members. Being listed on this document allows Pagan and Heathen military members to accurately communicate their religious preference, rather than being designated “Other,” and grants them associated benefits and protections. Four of the religions added to the document include Heathenry, Asatru, Seax Wicca, and Druidry. The Army had already recognized The Troth, while the Air Force had already recognized Heathenry and Asatru.