Archives For Virginia

There are lots of articles and essays of interest to modern Pagans and Heathens out there, sometimes more than our team can write about in-depth in any given week. So The Wild Hunt must unleash the hounds in order to round them all up.

va-largeseal RICHMOND, Va. — In an update to a previous story, Virginia resident Robert C. Doyle was sentenced to 17.5 years for “for robbery, conspiracy, and possessing firearms as a felon.” Doyle was originally charged in November 2015 along with Ronald Beasley Chaney and Charles Halderman, both of whom will be sentenced this month.

During the investigation and initial hearings, the FBI reported that the three men were involved with a white supremacist organization and also practicing Ásatrú. At that time, local and national Heathens immediately responded to those media reports in order to combat negative publicity.

According to the more recent news, the FBI actually used this particular case detail to help the investigation. As was reported, “[Doyle] was contacted in October by a member of the Ásatrú religion who said he was coming to the Richmond area for a job and needed a place to stay. Doyle helped him out, not knowing he was an informant.” Those conversations were recorded and helped lead to the arrest.

USA

  • Need a reading? There’s an app for that. In an article titled “Covens versus Coders” Broadly discusses the frustrations that some modern Witches have with the new generation of digital fortune tellers. Journalist Kari Paul writes, “With thousands of reviews on some of the top occult apps, it’s clear many of these programs have amassed a large user base. However, some seasoned witches are skeptical that their spiritual traditions can be successfully converted into code.”
  • The Satanic Temple Los Angeles is planning to  “announce its presence in the city of Lancaster California with an introductory Satanic Ritual” on 6-6-16. The organization goes on to explain that they will be using GPS to place a pentagram around the entire city of Lancaster for both its protection and as a “solemn promise” that the temple stands with the city.
  • According to the Abilene-Reporter News, local Brainbridge Island craftswoman Sally Noedel has become overwhelmed with orders for Trump “VooDoo” dolls. Noedel has been making a variety of political figures but, in recent months, the orders for Trump dolls have become so high that she had to stop all other crafts work and has contracted with a screen printing company. The “Trumpy” dolls are packaged with book of “VooDoo” spells. In the article, she talks about the unexpected sales growth and added “They don’t have to stick it with pins. They could just cuddle it. Maybe cast happy spells on it.” Noedel predicts that the high sales will continue well into the fall.

International

  • In the BBC Travel edition, writer Inka Piegsa-Quischotte shared her trip to a small “cursed village” in Spain. In the article, Piegsa-Quischotte details her experience in Trasmoz, a city with a long Witchcraft history. To share that history as well as the modern manifestations of magic in Trasmoz, Piegsa-Quischotte spoke with a local modern Witch, Lola Ruiz Diaz, who said, “To be a Witch today is a badge of honour.”
  • Early this year at Ankara University in Turkey, a group of women formed a group known as “The Campus Witches.” They are reportedly “a network of female university students who urge women to stand up against male violence and sexual harassment.” As shown in a YouTube video, the women often “take matters into their own hands” and confront accused attackers. According to the news report, the group’s slogan is “Never rely on a prince! When you need a miracle, pin your hopes on a Witch.” Like many other women before them, the Campus Witches are using the icon of the witch to empower their progressive movement.
  • The Huffington Post shared an article about Haitian Vodou Priestess Manbo Katy, who is the subject of recent documentary by Broadly. Katy works locally as a respected healer, both for spiritual and physical ailments. She says, “I’m always there for everyone. Even when their problems seem overwhelming, I always let them know that one day things will change.”

  • Are the Estonians a nation of Neo-Pagans? Writer Anna-Maria Zarembok describes how the pre-Christian traditions and beliefs have survived in the country through the coming of Christian influence, war and Soviet occupation. She writes, “Estonians maintained a traditional culture of neo-Paganism that has continued to affect Estonian culture, beliefs and traditions to this day.”
  • Traditional and folk healers are now being asked to join Christian pastors and the medical community to help heal or assist those with mental illness in rural parts of Kenya. Many of these illnesses have long been attributed to the practice of Witchcraft, curses or demons. As a result, the afflicted are ignored and do not get assistance of any kind. The program is brand new and sponsored by the Africa Mental Health Foundation, a Nairobi-based nongovernmental organization, the Makueni County government, U.S.-based Columbia University, and a grant from the Canadian government.

Art, Music, Culture

  • In April, The New York Times reported on a European Music Archaeology Project that is recreating ancient instruments. Among those instruments are the Scandinavian war horn, the carnyx, vulture bone flutes, ancient bag pipes, and replica of a instrument found in Tutankhamen’s tomb. “If you reconstruct a sword, no one apart from a homicidal maniac could use it for the purposes intended. But reconstruct an instrument, and anyone can experience it,” said trombonist John Kenny.
  • Ghanaian Artist Azizaa is using her talent and creativity to challenge the religious status quo in her country.  Ghana is considered one of the most religious nations in the world. Back in September, she was interviewed by Fader journalist Benjamin Lebrave about her work and her mission. She said, “How can anyone of African descent be worshiping the same tool used to uselessly murder their ancestors?”  The article shares her video “Black Magic Woman,” which directly addresses this topic.
  • As reported by a number of news sources, The Wheel of Time is finally going to make it to television. A pilot aired with little fanfare in 2015, after which a legal battle began over the television rights. In April, Robert Jordan’s widow Harriet McDougal announced that these legal issues are now resolved and the project is back on.
  • Lastly, for your enjoyment, we share the following video starring violinist Lindsey Stirling, who surprised a crowd of people on the street with a dazzling performance.