Trees and sun in Oregon. Photo: Jason Thomas Pitzl

Pagan Community Notes: South African radio show ridicules SAPRA founder, gathering in Niota, Tenn., and more!

 

WILDERNESS EAST, WESTERN CAPE, South Africa – Last week, Damon Leff, founding director of South African Pagan Rights Alliance (SAPRA), editor-in-chief of Penton Independent Alternative Media, and a contributor to TWH was interviewed in a segment on Jacaranda FM, ”The Scenic Drive with Rian”. Leff was ridiculed and treated with disrespect. Leff issued the following statement to TWH regarding his experience:
 On Wednesday, 29 May, I appeared as an invited guest on ‘The Scenic Drive with Rian’. I was interviewed by Rian van Heerden and his team from 6 to 6.30pm. During the interview I was repeatedly ridiculed and mocked by [Rian] van Heerden and members of his team.

The Epidemic of “Witch Hunts” (part one)

Part one of our two part interview with Damon Leff. Leff is a South African Pagan involved in education and advocacy for human rights and religious freedom. We spoke with him about the South African Pagan Rights Alliance (SAPRA) and the work it is doing.

In wake of witchcraft accusations, concerns rise over religious regulation in South Africa

PRETORIA, South Africa –A self-styled prophet and leader of the Enlightened Christian Gathering is being sued because he accused a businessperson of being a witch on live television, and some South African Pagans fear the case may bolster a push to regulate religion. If that were to come to pass, members of minority traditional and Pagan groups may be disproportionately affected in this country. Witchcraft is a complicated topic throughout Africa. Witch accusations can lead to violence, arising out of negative associations made to traditional practices. The emergence of Neopagan movements such as Wicca make the use of the word “witch” all the more confusing.

South African Witches face obstacles in the public practice of magic

[The following article is a joint project between The Wild Hunt and Damon Leff, a human rights activist, Witch, and editor-in-chief of Penton Independent Alternative Media. Leff is also the director of the South African Pagan Rights Alliance, and owns his own pottery studio called Mnrva Pottery. He is currently studying Law at the University of South Africa, and lives in the Wilderness, Western Cape, South Africa.]

SOUTH AFRICA — Michael Hughes, the unofficial face of the recent February 24 mass binding ritual against the 45th President of the U.S. Donald Trump, described it as a tool for political resistance against “the Devil.” In the wake of the numerous international headlines around the world, South African Witches were left wondering whether such public magical resistance against a sitting head of state will in any way influence, or reinforce their own government’s existing negative perception of Witches. South African Witches live in a country that is still hostile to any notion of “witchcraft” as a valid spiritual pursuit. For most South Africans, including influential Traditional Healers and Traditional Leaders, Witchcraft is viewed as a wholly negative practice.