Patron saint of the Romani honoured in Hamilton

HAMILTON, On. – A celebration in honour of Sara e Kali, patron saint of the Romani people, will be held at the Willow Cove Pavillion, in Confederation Park, located in Hamilton, Ontario. This event is the vision of organizer John “Corvus” Huculiak. He instigated this celebration of the saint, after attending a retreat at Brushwood: “She came to me during a ritual. The feelings of security and passion were overwhelming, and [I] made an oath to fashion her effigy, align her current to where I lived, and have a one-time celebration to welcome her to the sacred geography of Hamilton.”

That “one-time celebration” was in 2014, and this year marks the fifth annual public celebration hosted by Huculiak and the Kali Sara Hamilton committee.

Column: The Venerable Bede

I am standing at an overlook outside the rail station in Durham. Mist covers the city, and slow rain leaves slicks along the path to my right. Past the lines of brick houses and motorways stands the newer Catholic church, Our Lady of Mercy and St. Godric. It’s barely a century-and-a-half old; I suspect the mortar between the stones is still wet.

Column: To Make the Voice of the Criminal Audible

Jean Genet’s text “The Criminal Child,” previously unavailable in English, was translated and published in December 2015. An anonymous commentary on the text, included as an afterword within the same pamphlet, reads “The Criminal Child” as an intricately coded set of instructions for magical initiation and ordeal. “The Criminal Child” was originally written in 1948 as a speech to be read on a radio show in order to address reforms to France’s youth prisons that had been proposed at the time. It was rejected and never read on the air. When Genet published the censored text the following year, he wrote in his introduction, “I would have liked to make the voice of the criminal audible.