Yule Blessings from The Wild Hunt

It’s our tradition here at The Wild Hunt to do a round-up of events that occur around this time of year. It is a busy time between Samhain and the close of the calendar year culminating in Yule known also as Alban Arthuan. They range from ancient festivals celebrating the darkest time of the year like Saturnalia, Tekufat Tevet and Yalda Night to the more recent traditions like Festivus and Burning the Clocks. It is a joyous time of the year celebrating the cessation of the growing dark and the promise of a returning light. In Rome, solstice festivals merged to become the festival of Dies Natalis Solis Invicti, the days of the birth of the unconquered sun.

Todd Alan returns to music with Earth Changes

CHAUTAUQUA, N.Y. – Earth Changes, the new album by musician Todd Alan, includes a dire warning in his song “We Can Unite.”

“It really is so simple, the end of the road is near,” Alan sings as his plaintive, John Denver-ish tenor meanders over his mellow banjo playing. “The way we’ve run our politics, we’ll just increase the fear, and fear will breed more violence. The killing will go on until some really foolish man ignites the atom bomb.”

Alan obviously penned the song while watching the news crawl on CNN one recent night, right? Er, no. The singer/guitarist/banjoist recorded the 10 songs of Earth Changes in 2006.

CalderaFest is cancelled

LAFAYETTE, Ga. — CalderaFest, a beleaguered Pagan music festival scheduled for May 2019, has been cancelled according to a statement released by festival founder David Banach. The festival debuted May 2016 in LaFayette, and a second one was scheduled there for Oct. 5-9, 2017. On Aug.

Spiral Dance songwriters capture magick, myths of two lands

ADELAIDE HILLS, Australia — The members of Spiral Dance are “song catchers of magick, myths and legend” – so says the Australian folk rock band’s website. On Land and Legend, the band’s latest album and its ninth since its 1996 debut, Spiral Dance walks in two worlds. Its members celebrate the gods, goddesses, and myths of their ancestral roots in the British Isles, and they seek to connect to the spirit of their Australian home. The Wild Hunt spoke to singer and main songwriter Adrienne Piggott, as well as accordion player and songwriter Paul Gooding, about walking that walk. TWH: Do you identify as Pagan?

Review: Spiral Dance connects to land and legend on latest CD

TWH — The goddess Brigid is not a jealous goddess – at least the Irish/Celtic goddess of poetry, healing and smith craft is not such a deity on Land and Legend, the latest album by the Australian band Spiral Dance. “I know Brigid’s walking with me when the wild flowers have come,” the Australian-born Adrienne Piggott sings on “Goddess of the Southern Land.” The lyrics continue with “and the wattle flowers into life the color of the sun. In misty mountain bush land the smell of eucalyptus after rain and bark fall signal that it’s time to celebrate Beltane.”

As the croaking drone of a didgeridoo and gentle djembe and guitar open the song which opens the CD, Piggott unveils a confession: despite remaining rooted to her ancestors in the British Isles and to Brigid, she is on a vision quest to discover and connect to a new goddess: the “rainbow serpent mother protector of the land” where Piggott lives in the Mount Lofty Ranges near Adelaide Hills in South Australia. The tone of Spiral Dance’s aptly-titled, mesmerizing ninth album is set from the start: connecting, or staying connected, to land and legend in the midst of an increasingly mobile global culture, in an age when a modern-day shaman’s dance is a mundane reality for so many humans who literally walk — or jet — between two worlds. It’s a topic of deep import for Pagans, polytheists and members of earth-based religions, especially those in the United States.