Pagan Community Notes: Satanic Temple files Lawsuit, New Dead Can Dance Release, Black Witches Convention, and more

NEW YORK – Last week The Satanic Temple made good on its statement it would sue Netflix and Warner Brothers over the use of a Baphomet statue that bears a striking resemblance to the statue commissioned by TST by filing $150M lawsuit in a New York district court. Court documents filed last Thursday cite copyright infringement, trademark violation, and injury to TST’s business reputation according to a report by CNBC. In a news story published by USA Today, the complaint filed states in part:

“What makes this case particularly striking and significant is that it arises in the context of Defendants who are highly sophisticated media production and distribution companies which blatantly misappropriated Plaintiff’s unique expression of an idea even though they have a long history of vigorously protecting their own intellectual property,”

As we reported last week, TST had threatened legal action against Netflix and Warner Brothers over its use of the statue of Baphomet in its new series, “The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina.” Lucien Greaves, co-founder of TST, was unable to provide us comment or a statement upon advice from legal counsel due to the pending litigation. TWH will continue to follow this developing story. *   *   *
AUSTRALIA– On November 2, 2018, Dead Can Dance released its first album, Dionysus, in six years.

A Darker Shade of Pagan: Top Ten of 2012

While I generally keep my music podcast, A Darker Shade of Pagan, from getting entangled in the daily workings of The Wild Hunt, every once in awhile I like to alert my readership of some great Pagan and Pagan-friendly music that I come across. Since I posted my ADSOP top ten of 2012 show on Sunday, I thought I would share what I thought were some of the best albums that speak to the Pagan soul from the past year. Consider it a gift-giving guide to the Pagan in your life looking for something different in the way of “Pagan music”. ADSOP’s Top Ten Albums of 2012:

10. Hexvessel – “No Holier Temple” [Purchase]

Dubbing themselves “forest folk from Finland,” Hexvessel first gained attention with 2011’s “Dawnbearer,” but it is with “No Holier Temple” that the band take their psychedelic folk-rock sound to new heights. Sounding like an ahead-of-its-time lost treasure from the vaults, Hexvessel could have gotten caught in becoming a mere tribute to the bands that inspired them, but luckily the sounds here are fresh thanks to inventive compositions and a judicious use of modern elements.

A Quick Note on Sacred Music

There are a couple stories I’m in the midst of writing, but none are quite ready for primetime. So instead I’d like to chat a bit about music. I’m about to record this week’s episode of A Darker Shade of Pagan, and I’m getting ready to see the great Peter Murphy in concert this evening. So music is foremost on my mind.
Murphy is, of course, a famous student of Sufi mysticism and religion, and that sense of the sacred imbues his work.

The Return of Dead Can Dance, and the Evolution of Pagan Music

On May 8th, Brendan Perry and Lisa Gerrard, collectively known as Dead Can Dance, announced that their first new album since 1996’s Spiritchaser would be released on August 9th, 2012 (It will also be the kick-off of their world tour). Entitled “Anastasis,” the new work will be “a spring album to coincide with both natures awakening and the groups subsequent rebirth,” according to Perry. This new album comes after a year of anticipation for hardcore fans, since Perry first revealed the planned return, and released a series of free live teaser EPs. While Dead Can Dance claims a devoted international fanbase, they really haven’t received the in-depth critical examination and attention of other bands from their era. This may be partially due to  being labeled as Goth early in their career, that their idea of a “dance” tune is 14th century composition the saltarello, and the fact that many of the bands directly inspired by them exist in their own tiny niche subgenres (they’re like the Velvet Underground of Neoclassical Darkwave).

(Pagan) Music Mondays: Atrium Animae and Seventh Harmonic

Welcome to (Pagan) Music Mondays, a new semi-regular feature here at The Wild Hunt! As many of you may know, I’m a lover of music, and have spent many years exploring albums and artists that appeal to the Pagan spirit. I’d like to expose you to new releases by Pagan artists, and also to bands that explore lyrical themes relevant to our worldviews. This week I’d like to look at two recently released albums that honor the musical legacy of Dead Can Dance: “Dies Irae” by Atrium Animae and “Garden of Dilmun” by Seventh Harmonic. The pervasive and enduring influence of Dead Can Dance can’t be overstated.