Archives For Passings

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

150318_285637801541688_2098495770_nJust as we were going to press, the passing of Jeff Rosenbaum was announced. The cause of death was a brain tumor. Rosenbaum is perhaps best known as the conceiver and a founder of the Association for Consciousness Exploration (ACE), the Chameleon Club, the Starwood Festival, and the WinterStar Symposium. Through the 1990s and early 2000s the Starwood Festival was arguably one of the most popular (and populous) outdoor festivals of its type, thanks to organizers cross-pollinating Pagan communities with other religious and visionary movements, featuring guests like Timothy Leary and Robert Anton Wilson. Rosenbaum talked a bit about this organizing vision when he was interviewed in the book “Modern Pagans.”

“Starwood is a big college of alternative thinking and alternative spirituality that suddenly appears like a carnival or circus. The tents go up, it stays there for a week, and then BOOM it’s gone, til next year. We have 140 or more classes from 9:30 in the morning till 6:15 in the evening–sometimes as many as 12 at a time. You can learn about Druidism, Ceremonial Magic, Wicca, Tibetan Buddhism, and Native American Practices. We have classes on psychedelia and psychology, and different “movement systems” like tai chi, yoga and aikido. Past speakers have included Timothy Leary, quantum physicist Fred Allen Wolf, Paul Krassner, and Steven Gaskin, who created the Farm, the biggest hippie commune in America. It’s all included in the cost of admission.”

As Rosenbaum puts it, he was “a student of an eclectic array of spiritual paths, philosophies, and illuminating pursuits,” and it was that wide-ranging desire to experience and know that drove his life. In addition to his work with ACE and Starwood, he was Robert Anton Wilson’s lecture agent for six years during the 1980s, played guitar & percussion with Ian Corrigan and Victoria Ganger in the bands Chameleon and Starwood Sizzlers, and was published (and interviewed) in a number of Pagan-themed publications. Tributes to Rosenbaum are already flooding his Facebook profile, but I think the most apt was a posthumous status update from Jeff Rosenbaum himself, which I think does a good job of capturing his spirit. Quote: “At 6:23 pm EST tonight I crossed over and left my body behind. My friends were by my side, the Firesign Clones were playing on the TV. It was calm and peaceful. Thank you all for your good wishes and support. Don’t worry about me, I’m fine.” What is remembered, lives. ADDENDUM: Here’s an obituary written by close friend Ian Corrigan.

dwsLWG1w_400x400The Pagan Environmental Coalition of NYC has sent out a call for help. The People’s Climate March is less than a month away and the number of Pagans pledging to march as part of the Interfaith contingent is “exploding,” according to organizers. PEC-NYC has started an Indigogo campaign with the goal of $3,000 by Sept. 18th. The monies will cover supplies for the weekend and hopefully, fund the transportation for Pagans from far-away to get to NYC for the weekend.  “$10 is breakfast for ten people. $100 is a bus ticket for a marcher from the midwest, $250 is a train ticket for a west coast based Marcher.” said Courtney Weber, an organizer with PEC-NYC. “We are at a pivotal point in history, and history has shown that boots in the streets truly can change the world. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to show world leaders that the people want serious action to address climate change, now. Marching alongside other faiths is the perfect opportunity to increase our knowledge and understanding of one another, and cross belief-barriers to fight for a common cause.” The link to the campaign can be found, here. If you are interested in attending the march with a Pagan contingent, please see their blog

pic01Pagan organizations and individuals have endorsed a campaign to urge California Governor Jerry Brown to sign California Senate Bill (SB) 1057 into law. The measure, which overwhelmingly passed in both the Assembly and the Senate, would mandate the reform of history and social science materials used in California schools. Supporters of 1057 claim it will “prevent bullying and promote a positive self-image for children” of different religions, backgrounds, and ethnicities. This will be done by requiring “an expert advisory group to create new History-Social Science Content Standards in a fair, open, and transparent manner. The advisory groups will be composed of scholars and educators, and must make a good faith effort to seek the input of representatives from diverse communities.” Pagan organizations that have signed on to this effort include the American Vinland Association/Freya’s Folk, Our Lady of the Wells Church, and The Patrick McCollum Foundation. In addition, Sabina Magliocco, author of “Witching Culture,” has signed on as a supporting academic. SB 1057 has also garnered the support of several religious minorities in California, including Hindu, Jain, and Jewish organizations.

10513320_1519749801581160_4666587913269014328_nThe new resource/website Polytheist.com will be launching this week! In an update to the forthcoming site’s Facebook page, posted last night, the official launch’s imminent arrival was heralded. Quote: “Coming this week, the official launch of Polytheist.com! Please stay tuned for this exciting set of columns, from a talented team of writers, voices, and visionaries from our Polytheist communities!” Polytheist.com, once launched, will be a “an online hub of columnists, contributors and content creators who are dedicated to many gods across many traditions.” The site is spearheaded by Anomalous Thracian (aka Theanos Thrax), who recently explained why this site is important. Quote: “For some time, many Polytheists have been seeking a place for discussing their religions, their divine relations, and their living lineages in such a way that effectively maximizes the vastness of the all-connecting technologies of the internet age to reach out to and commune with other like-minded and like-religioned groups and individuals, without inviting the targeting and resistance often experienced in spaces not dedicated to this specific aim.” Stay tuned, as we will be talking more about this project very soon. In the meantime, be sure to bookmark that link!

Margot Adler

Margot Adler

Earlier last month I reported on an initiative to raise money for a memorial bench in Central Park honoring Margot Adler, author of the landmark book “Drawing Down the Moon,” who passed away recently after a long battle with cancer. Quote: “Many of you have asked about ways to honor Margot’s memory. After discussions with a few of her closest friends, it’s been decided that collecting donations toward buying a memorial bench in her name in Central Park is the best plan. It’s something she spoke of in her final days. As you know, she lived on the edge of the park nearly her entire life and walked through it daily.” I’m happy to report that the month-long fundraiser has managed to raise over $11,000 dollars, enough to pay for the memorial bench, and to also endow a tree in the park. A large number of Pagans and Pagan organizations donated money towards this initiative, including The Sisterhood of Avalon, the Michigan Council of Covens and Solitaries, and The Witches’ Voice. This is a fitting tribute, one that will no doubt become a place of pilgrimage for all who honored her and her work.

In Other Pagan Community News: 

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

“I don’t believe in objectivity, but I do believe deeply in fairness.” – Margot Adler

The first time I met author and journalist Margot Adler in person, we were having lunch together at PantheaCon in San Jose, and she was showing me pictures of an Occupy protest that were on her iPad. It didn’t sink in at the time, but I later realized that she was generously acknowledging me as a part of her journalistic tribe. That she was sharing an emerging story she was excited about. During that weekend I wanted so much to transmit to her how important she was to me, to what I had become, but I didn’t really have the chance. On reflection, it seemed to me that for Margot the reward was doing the work, documenting her experiences, and sharing it with others.

Margot Adler

Margot Adler

Like many, I learned of Margot’s death yesterday morning, via Facebook.

“Old friends, long time fans, today at 4am Margot breathed easily for the first time in two weeks. Later today, at 10:30am she was pronounced deceased.

Her condition had been getting much worse over the weeks and months and the brain radiation (which she had a treatment of scheduled today, tomorrow, and wednesday) was thought to help her double vision, since it was the cause.

Well, Margot and John both won’t be seeing double anymore, but they will be seeing each other for the rest of time.

With much love and difficulty do I write this,

Her son, Alex”

Margot Adler was a noted journalist who worked for National Public Radio (NPR), and they have paid a moving tribute to their colleague.

“Margot once wrote in an e-mail that she absorbed the values of many of her colleagues in developing her own view of life – a belief, she said in a world without snark, of deep values, and that despite everything she’d experienced and encountered and covered, an abiding belief that people were basically good.”David Folkenflik, NPR News, New York.

For almost every Pagan, former Pagan, or would-be Pagan, she will be largely remembered as the author of “Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshippers, and Other Pagans in America.” It is truly hard to over-state the importance of Adler’s book, as it had a hand in shaping what many of us call “Pagan community” today. While Adler was not the first person to attempt an overview of the emerging groups of modern Pagans in America, her 1979 book was by far the best, the most read, and it helped catalyze the move towards a community/movement consciousness among the Pagans reading it. A largely small-group and regional assortment of religious adherents shifted towards a broader umbrella identity.

Margot Adler (author of "Drawing Down the Moon") and Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary sharing breakfast together.

Margot Adler and Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary sharing breakfast together.

“Blessings to Margot Adler in her journey to the realm of the Ancestors. She died this morning from cancer. Support to her son Alex, and to all of us mourning her passing. Margot and I were close friends since we first connected 36 years ago and had many adventures together, including conducting each others weddings and rooming together at PantheaCon. The world is a better place because of Margot. Let us remember and give thanks for Margot, her brilliant mind, her loving heart, her beautiful voice, her activism, her writings, her news reporting, her other works, her magic, her bright spirit. May we take comfort in knowing that she lives on in our memories, in the many people, organizations, endeavors she blessed. Hail & Farewell, Margot! We honor you, we remember you, we love you. Blessed Be.” - Selena Fox, Circle Sanctuary

“Drawing Down the Moon” was also important because Margot Adler was truly one of us. She was a member of The Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans (CUUPS), Covenant of the Goddess (COG), and other groups, she attended Pagan festivals, led workshops, and loved to lead Pagan chant sessions. She was not an outsider sampling our religious wares then making snarky asides during the book tour, she believed in our potential, loved us, flaws and all.

“Margot Adler was a brilliant, loving and passionate voice in Unitarian Universalist Paganism. As a former board member of the Covenant of Unitarian Universalist Pagans (CUUPS), she stood for a democratically, inclusive organization that embodied Unitarian Universalist thinking and voices. She also brought to the denomination the joy of ritual, music and dance that celebrated our humanity, our place on the planet and our connections with the God/dess and Universal energies. Her voice, wit and liveliness will be missed deeply. We honor the gifts Margot brought to UUism and to CUUPS.” – Jerrie Hildebrand, Corporate Secretary, CUUPS

The last time I saw Margot Adler I said to her: there would be no Wild Hunt without your example, without your work, without your kindness in giving an emerging Pagan blog an interview back in 2006, and that I know you are fighting your cancer and are planning to win, but I’m truly thankful and didn’t want to miss this opportunity to tell you that. I didn’t think it would truly be the last time I would speak to her, but I’m glad I said those words, and I’m glad she attended the gathering for Pagan media practitioners that I co-hosted that year at PantheaCon so she could see how a journalist traveling the country, documenting an emerging religious movement could ripple out into a diverse and thriving ecosystem of Pagan media-makers.

“We are all part of the life cycle. Like a seed we are born, we sprout, we grow, we mature and decay, making room for future generations who, like seedlings, are reborn through us. As for the persistence of consciousness, deep down, I thought, ‘How can we know?’ Perhaps we simply return to the elements; we become earth and air and fire and water. That seemed all right to me.”Margot Adler

Margot Adler was a kind, generous, funny, talented, dedicated, and wickedly smart person. She gave us all so much. I have no definite answer regarding the persistence of consciousness either, but if she has simply returned to the elements, well, that seems all right with me too.

Local papers in Geyserville, California are reporting that Lady Lorean Vigne, founder of Isis Oasis Sanctuary, passed away on July 15th at the age of 82.

Photo: Geyserville Press Democrat.

Photo: Geyserville Press Democrat.

“Lady Loreon Vigne was a successful business woman who brought an animal sanctuary, Egyptian Temple and retreat center to the agricultural town of Geyserville.  She brought new ideas and welcomed all to be a part of her journey by opening Isis Oasis one Sunday a month to visitors. A local Geyserville personality, Vigne opened her Isis Oasis home to the community for many years.”

Lady Lorean Vigne founded the Isis Oasis Sanctuary in 1978, and it was officially recognized as a church in the state of California in 1996. Dedicated to the Egyptian goddess Isis, they followed the principles of the Fellowship of Isis, as stated at their website.

“We generally follow the principles of the Fellowship of Isis, out of which our temple was born. The FOI was established by Lady Olivia Robertson and her brother at Clonegal Castle, Enniscorthy, Ireland, which has thousands of members in over 80 countries. Those who are members of the FOI are connected only by their love for the Goddess as each practices in whatever way they wish. The idea is to create balance by incorporating the feminine in deity. We all need the nurturing, forgiveness, and compassion that the Great Mother provides, as we seek to integrate and strengthen both our lunar and solar qualities. Those who become Priestesses and Priests of Isis, within this Temple, pledge to honor all life and commit to help the earth and her people’s not only for her preservation but to bring to our lives and the lives of future generations more light and wisdom.”

286087_10150352604262317_4806791_oLady Lorean Vigne, in addition to overseeing the temple, was an artist and craftsperson, and was married to the Beat-era experimental filmmaker Dion Vigne. A larger than life personality, she was known for her famous pet ocelots, and patronage of the arts in Geyserville. The Temple of Isis at Isis Oasis Sanctuary released the following statement on her passing.

“It is with sad tidings that we announce today the passing of Lady Loreon Vigne into her journey beyond the veil on July 15th. As she enters the care of Anubis, on her journey to the land of Osiris, we have been holding her noon ceremonies and vigils here at Isis Oasis HQ. She has taught and touched many, and continues to do so with her spirit, within the Temple of Isis and beyond. As co-hostess of this Symposium, Loreon had a hand in creating each and every aspect of it, and we will continue her work throughout the event, being true to her spirit and zest for knowledge, and the sharing of that knowledge. In addition, we will have a special High Holy Ceremony honoring the life and work of our Great Lady, celebrating her life and artistry. This formal ceremony will be a precursor to a second honoring at our Annual Convocation, where new Priestesses and Priests are ordained into the Temple of Isis and Fellowship of Isis.”

A formal ceremony honoring Lady Lorean Vigne will be held at the Temple’s annual Inner Sanctum Symposium at the end of August.

“I am sad to hear the news of the passing of another Great Soul, but I know that Loreon knows the way home. Her life was such a blessing to so many others. I met Loreon at the World Parliament of Religions in Chicago so many years ago now, yet it feels just like yesterday and though we never had the opportunity to meet again, her work and achievement remain an outstanding inspiration. Thank you Loreon, for blazing the trail that others might follow in your footsteps.” – Naomi Ozaniec

For more on the life of Lady Lorean Vigne, she wrote an autobiography entitled “The Goddess Bade Me Do It” that’s available for purchase through the temple. May she rest in the arms of her goddess. What is remembered, lives.

Sparky T. Rabbit

Sparky T. Rabbit

On June 2nd, the ritualist, liturgist, performer, and Witch known to many as Sparky T. Rabbit passed away. Sparky T. Rabbit (aka Bruner Soderberg, Peter B. Soderberg) brought his acting and performance background into his modern Pagan experience, and as a result, helped shape Pagan liturgy and practice as we now know it. This included his work with the ritual music duo Lunacy, which released two albums during its tenure. Sparky T. Rabbit, during his lifetime, involved himself in several religious communities, was very influential in shaping gay male spirituality within religious Witchcraft, endeared himself to many, and gained a reputation as someone who would, in his own words, critique and satirize neopaganisms, monotheisms, and any other -isms that seem appropriate.” 

“I first met Sparky in a hot tub–I believe it was somewhere in Madison Wisconsin sometime in the ’80s when I was there to do a workshop.  I remember him singing and laughing, and how his beautiful voice transported me.  Sparky has given us so many of the chants that I still use in rituals and celebrations.  They form the rhythm and melody of my life in the Craft.  Sparky could be difficult at times.  He often stirred a bitter brew in his cauldron–yet out of that ferment came great beauty and inspiration.  I honor his spirit, and will play his music and remember him singing and laughing!  In love may he return again!”Starhawk, author of “The Spiral Dance.” 

Since his passing, a number of wonderful tributes and obituaries have emerged from those who knew him. Aline “Macha” O’Brien explores her long association and friendship with Sparky, and storyteller Steven Posch, a close confidant, posted three days of tribute to a man that he called his “heart-friend and partner-in-arts,” while Nels Linde at PNC-Minnesota shares remembrances from those who’ve been touched by his life.

“Sparky T. Rabbit’s voice is intertwined with the roots of my development as a witch, and we still use the chants that he wrote and the chants that he popularized within our covens today. I played the cassettes for his two albums so often that I wore them out and had to buy replacements twice. I cherish the one time that I had the opportunity to sing with him. It is still a luminous fan boy moment for me. I grieve the loss of such a beautiful man and his beautiful talents, but I also grieve that so many in the current generation of Pagans have not heard of him. What is remembered lives. Take the time to look him up and find copies of his music which is finally available again in digital formats. Then you’ll feel the joy of discovering his music, and also share my sense of loss as well. May he go forth shining.” - Ivo Dominguez, Jr. Elder, Assembly of the Sacred Wheel

We here at The Wild Hunt have been honored that Ray Bayley, Sparky T. Rabbit’s handfasted husband since 1984, took a moment from what must be a very emotionally trying time, to share a few words about his partner’s life and legacy.

Sparky & Ray at their handfasting at 1984 Pagan Spirit Gathering. Photo: Mari Powers of Circle Sanctuary.

Sparky & Ray at their handfasting at 1984 Pagan Spirit Gathering. Photo: Mari Powers of Circle Sanctuary.

“Peter/Sparky/Bruner worked on, showed me and others, and sought to walk the talk that spirituality, psychology, sociology, politics, and communication are all one thing. E.g. he sought to not tolerate hypocrisy and power-over manipulations, and he promoted clear communication, consensus, and empowerment.

He promoted high quality and people seeking to have high quality. E.g. he brought theatre skills and knowledge to ritual performance. He promoted experts doing their expertise and people becoming actual expert in what they claimed to have expertise in. He wanted us to be supportive of feedback/critique (thus given in a neutral or friendly fashion) and to do it in a positive direction where a suggestion is made for betterment. Some might think that supporting high quality and the authority of experts/expertise was allowing for power-over hierarchies. However, he wanted hierarchies only in the sense that some are better at some things than others and we consensually agree, through clear communication among us, that some among us have a position that is more authoritative, more guiding, even more boundary setting in some situations, for as long as we agree on that and their worthiness of that position continues.

Peter/Sparky/Bruner valued humor highly both in “it’s good to laugh” and in using tricksterism to stir the pot and poke at the overly serious and overly inflated. He valued sincerity highly, however seriousness was leavened with some humor. His laugh was said by some to be like a jolly, good king laughing, loud, spontaneous, and friendly.

He and I were concerned at first that my being a scientist would conflict with his being so on the poetry, stories, lyrics, spiritual side. However, my creed of ‘wide open to possibility, skeptical about actuality, probability is the only certainty’ turned out to fit well with his wanting clear communication, truth not lies, allowing for diversity, etc.”

Like Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary, who knew Sparky T. Rabbit for years, many are thankful for his spirit, wit, rituals, stories, and music.” It’s clear that he was an individual who reached deep into other people, and helped them toward their own realization and power.

“I remember Sparky from the beginning. Way back in the late 1970s and early 1980s was the beginning of many Pagan festivals and groups. I lived in Minneapolis at the time. There was an early gay men’s spiritual weekend at Rowan Tree. There was a Pan Pagan Festival in Indiana. COG was at Circle Pines. PSG started its long journey through the years and diverse locations. A dear departed friend had a post Pagan festival gathering of gay men at his lake house in Michigan. Conversations online and many deep conversations recently in Missouri and at Stonehouse are fresh in my mind. Long years, deep connections. Sparky was there for me to help loosen me up. I was a shy introvert. Every step of the way I learned how precious considered thought and action are, and how important being fabulous is. I learned that I was valued and that valuing others and sharing is what life is about. An abiding principle was that it is always a greater thrill to expect the unexpected than to expect the expected. I have a deep admiration for his music, teaching, and sharing; and a love for the man and his work in this world. I hope we meet again Bruner.” – Nicholas Sea, Kentucky

To celebrate Sparky T. Rabbit’s legacy, Ray Bayley hopes to reissue Sparky’s two Lunacy albums on CD, and publish other works. What is remembered lives.

On Tuesday it was announced on her official Facebook page that Morning Glory Zell (aka Morning Glory Zell-Ravenheart) had passed away after a long struggle with cancer and other complications.

Morning Glory Zell

Morning Glory Zell

“Blessings upon our High Priestess of the Goddess Morning Glory Zell who embarked upon her silver ship to the Summerlands this evening, Tuesday May 13th, 2014 at 5:42 p.m.”

With her long-time husband and companion Oberon Zell, Morning Glory was a pivotal figure in the history of contemporary Paganism in America. She formed the early core of the Church of All Worlds (CAW), helped create and edit Green Egg Magazine, one of the most influential publications in modern Paganism’s history, founded The Mythic Images Collection, and grew to become a highly respected source on goddess lore who toured the country speaking and teaching.

“My beloved has passed beyond the veil. She drew her final breath at 5:42 yesterday afternoon. Her handmaidens, students and priestesses prepared her body and dressed her in her beautiful Sea Priestess robes. She is now lying in grace in the Temple for a few days until we take her body to its final resting place in the Earth. It’s been an incredible week–grief and joy intermixing like a lava lamp. So many beautiful loving people gathered around, taking care of everything. That’s all I can really say right now…I can barely see to type.”Oberon Zell

In addition to her work within the context of modern Paganism, Morning Glory Zell was a strong advocate for non-monogamy and open relationship structures. She is widely credited with coining the term “polyamory” in 1990 to describe multiple loving committed relationships (in contrast to the notion of “swinging”). In a new (2010) introduction to that essay, Morning Glory said “this whole polyamorous lifestyle is the avante-garde of the 21st century. Expanded families will become a pattern with wider acceptance as the monogamous nuclear family system breaks apart under the impact of serial divorces.” With Oberon Zell, Morning Glory formed the Ravenheart family, a blended multi-partner polyamorous family that was profiled in the RE/SEARCH title “Modern Pagans.” John C. Sulak, who co-wrote “Modern Pagans,” would go on to write the story of Oberon and Morning Glory’s life in  “The Wizard and the Witch: Seven Decades of Counterculture, Magick & Paganism.” 

9780738714820_p0_v1_s260x420“This is the stranger-than-fiction story of two soul mates who rejected the status quo and embraced higher ideals . . . and had a whole lot of fun while they were at it. Reclaiming Pagan as a spiritual identity—and living in an open marriage for over four decades—Oberon and Morning Glory Zell truly embody the freedom to think, to love, and to live.

Telling the stories of their singular lives in this unique oral history, Oberon and Morning Glory—together with a colorful tribe of friends, lovers, musicians, homesteaders, researchers, and ritualists—reveal how they established the Church of All Worlds, revitalized Goddess worship, discovered the Gaea Thesis, raised real Unicorns, connected a worldwide community through Green Egg magazine, searched for mermaids in the South Pacific, and founded the influential Grey School of Wizardry.”

Llewellyn Worldwide, the publisher of that title, released this statement on Morning Glory’s passing.

“We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Morning Glory Zell. Morning Glory and Oberon Zell have been leaders in the Pagan community since meeting at one of the Gnosticons in the 1970s. She will be greatly missed. Blessings on your journey, MG. Love, light and heartfelt sympathies go out to Oberon Zell and his family from everyone at Llewellyn.”

As Morning Glory’s health deteriorated, an initiative was put forward to record as much of her accumulated wisdom through audio recordings as possible. To preserve the decades of insights and experiences from a life lived in service to her goddesses.

“There are people whose lives make an indelible mark on the tapestry of life. Morning Glory Zell was such a person. As Priestess, Wife, Teacher and Friend; she devoted her life to providing a contemporary throne to our ancient Goddess. We thank you! We celebrate you! We will miss your physical presence. But we will carry forth your work and we will honor you as a Sacred Ancestress, Morning Glory. The death of your body is but the expansion of your spirit. May our lady guide and guard you in your journey, great lady. And, may the love of so many of us be a source of strength and healing for Oberon. As a Pagan and Witch tribe We stand with you. I love you both dearly. My Gods love you.”Orion Foxwood

“She brought a lot of light into the worlds of all those around her. In love may she return again.”Aline O’Brien (M. Macha Nightmare)

Green Egg Magazine has announced that they will be publishing a special free tribute issue in honor of Morning Glory.

“We will be publishing our next issue of Green Egg in about 2 weeks. This will be a special tribute to Morning Glory. We are collecting stories about her so if you’d like to submit a story re: M.G. send it in – even if only a paragraph, that’s OK. We just want to get as many stories about her as possible. You can send your stories in to: greeneggzine@gmail.com if you have pictures you think are unique, please send those along as well.  THIS ISSUE WILL BE FREE!!!”

May she rest in the arms of her Goddess, and may her spirit return to us again. What is remembered, lives.

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Stephanie Jean Clement, Ph.D.

Stephanie Jean Clement

Today, we start with some sad news. Author Stephanie Clement, who wrote several titles for Llewellyn Worldwide, including “Meditation for Beginners,” passed away last week after a diagnosis of cancer. Quote: “It is with sadness that we share the news of author Stephanie Clement’s passing. According to her husband, Greg, she passed away last Wednesday evening after being diagnosed with a form of cancer a few months ago. Stephanie was the author of several Llewellyn books. Her book Meditation for Beginners remains among our perennial bestsellers, and Stephanie authored many astrology titles over the years (including the Astrology Made Easy Series). Stephanie was also a former Llewellyn employee; after leaving our offices she worked for a time as an Acquiring Editor contracting new astrology-based titles. She was a practicing astrologer for more than 30 years and is former president of the American Federation of Astrologers. Our thoughts go out to Greg and the family.” Our thoughts go out to the friends and family of the author, what is remembered, lives.

Morpheus Ravenna

Morpheus Ravenna

Artist and ritualist Morpheus Ravenna has announced that she is starting a new book project dedicated to the goddess Morrígan. Quote: “My book project, a comprehensive book on the lore, history, and worship of the Morrígan, now has a publisher: independent esoteric publishing house Concrescent Press. Concrescent is the imprint headed by Sam Webster, M.Div., a brilliant scholar of Pagan studies and the magical arts, as well as an old and dear friend. I am delighted to be working with Sam and Concrescent on this project. My tentative working title for the book is The Book of the Great Queen. I’m completing the final 5% or so of primary research, and will be completing the writing of the book over the coming months, to deliver by the end of the year. You can view an early, general topical outline here.” Ravenna spearheads a priesthood dedicated to the Morrígan called Coru Cathubodua, which is planning an Ireland trip for 2015. A crowdfunding campaign to fund her book project will be coming soon. Here’s a sneak peak at some of the work being done on the book project.

Patheos Pagan Portal contributors after their thought-provoking panel on intrafaith efforts within our community.

Patheos Pagan contributors

The religion website Patheos is celebrating its 5th anniversary today. While initially aiming to be a scholar-approved resource site for various religious traditions, it quickly evolved into the multi-faith blogging/opinion-driven platform you see today. It became a popular Pagan destination thanks to its Pagan “channel” (they used to be called “portals”), which recruited a number of writers and columnists, including, for a time, me. Here’s a quote from their official press release: “Patheos.com, the world’s premier destination for dialogue on religion and spirituality, today announced that the site crossed 6 million unique monthly visitors for the first time since its launch five years ago today. This puts Patheos in the top 500 websites in the U.S., according to Quantcast. Since launching in 2009, Patheos has grown to be the largest independent religion and spirituality website. Many of the site’s faith channels have become the largest online space for that community, so that Patheos now contains the largest Catholic website, the largest Atheist website, the largest Progressive Christian website, and the largest Pagan website – all at the same time.” They’re the biggest! Congrats to everyone at Patheos Pagan, I wish them every success moving forward.

In Other Pagan Community News:

  • Cultural anthropologist, author, and educator Angeles Arrien passed away unexpectedly last week. Quote: “Our beloved Angeles Arrien passed away unexpectedly last Thursday afternoon April 24, 2014. This Monday her office started to inform hundreds of organizations, colleagues, friends, and thousands of students nationally and internationally of her unexpected death. Angeles was a person of deep faith, compassion, kindness, generosity and honesty, and an authentic, vital, joyful presence everywhere she went, and with whomever she interacted.” Arrien is perhaps best known for her “Four-Fold Way” teachings, which many Pagans took part in. Our condolences to her friends, family, and students.
  • The 2014 Pagan Podkin Supermoot (PPSM), a gathering of Pagan podcast producers, has been announced. Quote: “If you’re a podkin who would like to attend the event, please email FireLyte@IncitingARiot.com using the subject line PPSM5 Attendance. Please make sure to include whether you would like to present a class at Chicago Pagan Pride and a summary of your class, so that I may pass it along to Twila.” The gathering will take place Friday, September 12 through Sunday, September 14 in Chicago, Illinois. Here’s the Facebook invitation.
  • The 2014 Beltane issue of ACTION, the official newsletter of AREN, is now available. As always, it is chock-full of interesting interviews (plain text version). Featured interviews this time out include Ivo Dominquez Jr, Lynne Hume, Eleiren Bowen, and more. Plain text version here. A reliable Pagan media treasure, and they’re looking for more people to interview! So, drop them a line!
Sabina Magliocco at the Conference on Current Pagan Studies. (Photo: Tony Mierzwicki)

Sabina Magliocco at the Conference on Current Pagan Studies. (Photo: Tony Mierzwicki)

  • The Conference on Current Pagan Studies has released its 2015 call for papers. Quote: “Monotheistic notions over the past two millennia have separated and polarized our manner of being in the world into realms of light and darkness, positive and negative, holy and desacralized, valued and devalued. Polytheists, Pagans, animists, et al view differently the interplay of light and dark, and seek to revalue, re-sacralize, and retrieve the dark. How do we interpret the Darkness? How do we imagine and reimagine our relationship with the Dark? Are there treasures hidden in the gloom, or are the shadows themselves treasures? Can monsters be gifts? How do we address the relationship between Darkness and Light?” Abstracts are due by September 20, 2014. Here’s a report from the 2014 conference.
  • The statement that Pagan chaplain and activist Patrick McCollum gave during the service held at the UN interfaith chapel prior to an interfaith meeting on nuclear disarmament that I reported on last week, has been posted. Quote: “The Earth Traditions honor the sacredness of every sentient and non-sentient being. We see all of creation as being a sacred and intricately intertwined web of life. Nuclear weapons and their proliferation stand in direct opposition to this premise and therefor are in direct opposition to our beliefs, morals, and values.”
  • Heather Freysdottir has some sad news to report about a local Pagan shop in Nova Scotia. Quote: “This is our last call email – if you are interested in the business, it is still for sale and we’d be happy to hear from you. In light of the shortening time frame, we are also willing to entertain alternate suggestions or to consider the sale of aspects of the business (you might be setting up your own venture and would like to buy only the store inventory, fixtures and supplier list. Possibly you’d like to take Little Mysteries on line and want the stock, name and branding and our online presence. If that sounds of interest, let’s talk.” More here.
  • Megalithica Books, an imprint of Immanion Press is seeking submissions for “Finding the Masculine in Goddess’ Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community and Service to the Goddess.” Quote: “This anthology will explore men and their relationship with the Goddess and the overarching Pagan community. We’re looking for essays and articles that detail personal experiences with the Goddess, How as men we come to know the Goddess, and ways you have worked through challenges and obstacles being a man within the Pagan movement.” Deadline for submissions is July 30th.

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Here are some quick updates on stories previously reported on at The Wild Hunt.

Frazier Glenn Cross

Frazier Glenn Cross

Frazier Glenn Cross: Alleged murderer Frazier Glenn Cross (aka Glenn Miller), an avowed white supremacist, currently held on murder and hate crime charges after reportedly opening fire on two Jewish community centers, was tied to Odinism earlier this week by CNN’s Belief Blog (despite citing a contradictory source). Since then, that reporting has been worked into official CNN newswire reports, and repeated by tabloids like the New York Daily News. However, other outlets, like Time Magazine, have sources that call Cross a “good Christian.” While the alleged killer’s true religious orientation remains murky, what is clear is that this has shone a light on the issue of racism within Pagan and Heathen faiths. Since I first reported, Heathen Joshua Rood wrote a guest column for CNN on Heathenism’s battle with white supremacists, Alyxander Folmer at Patheos.com (also a Heathen) writes about the work of Heathens United Against Racism, including a fundraiser for victims of the Kansas City shooting that has raised over $2,500 dollars so far, Karl E.H. Seigfried at the Norse Mythology Facebook page pokes holes in the theory that the Nazis were Odin-worshippers, and Beth Lynch writes about the nature of Odin at Witches & Pagans Magazine. Quote: “Odin is a god of many, many things: wisdom, inspiration, exploration, shamanism, prophecy, kingship, rune magic, language and expression, expanding and altering consciousness, creativity, death, blood magic, self-sacrifice, and yes, even warfare, savagery and bloodshed at times.  But do you know one thing He does not stand for?  Racial hate crimes.” This issue seems to have galvanized anti-racism voices within modern Heathenry, and will perhaps lead to a new level of engagement with the mainstream media on these often misunderstood faiths.

U.S.Helen Ukpabio: I’ve written several times about the infamous Nigerian Christian leader Helen Ukpabio, whose witch-hunting ministry has generated a lot of controversy both inside and outside of Nigeria. Now, activists inside the UK are working to get her banned from traveling to that country after a recent visit. Quote: “In the letter, the Witchcraft and Human Rights Information Network (WHRIN), the Bar Human Rights Committee of England and Wales and the International Humanist and Ethical Union (IHEU) cite the cases of Victoria Climbié and Kristy Bamu as examples where witchcraft beliefs played a role in the  horrific torture and murder of children. ‘Whilst the Government has moved swiftly to block entry to the UK for Islamic preachers whose presence is considered as harmful to the public good, there have been no cases of Christian pastors facing such measures,’ the letter said.” While Ukpabio denies that her teachings incite abuse, Tracy McVeigh, who went to Nigeria to report on children accused of witchcraft says that “even the slightest risk of one case of the kind of abuse I witnessed in the Niger Delta happening here because someone somewhere takes the idea of demonic possession too far, is more than enough reason in my mind to deny a visa to any preacher who claims that children can be witches.” Religion News Service notes that “during the last 10 years, British police have been involved with 81 cases of African children being abused, tortured and sometimes killed after treatment by so-called spiritual mediums.” The Wild Hunt will have more on this story tomorrow (Sunday).

Town of Greece v. Galloway: The case of Town of Greece v. Galloway is currently awaiting a decision from the Supreme Court, and it’s a case I have written a lot about. I’ve repeatedly harped on how this SCOTUS case has a huge Wiccan angle that the mainstream media seems to have largely overlooked. Whatever the outcome, Wiccans, have played a key role in this issue’s development. The law journal Oyez has a fabulous “deep dive” on the issue, the case, and its consequences (complete with videos).

What’s clear, as we await a verdict (probably in June), is that ripples from this case already seem to be influencing public prayer policy at government meetings outside of the Town of Greece. The Pismo Beach City Council decided to settle a suit about its prayers, officially ending the practice before meetings. The article notes that the settlement will stand no mater what the SCOTUS decision will be. Meanwhile, a Maryland County Commissioner recently defied a court-issued injunction to invoke Jesus Christ, perhaps in the belief that SCOTUS will eventually rule in her favor. Keep an eye out, because if the standard for public invocations is altered, a huge number of cases currently in litigation could be affected.

Apolinario Chile Pixtun: In a final note, Guatemalan Mayan elder Apolinario Chile Pixtun, spokesperson for the Mayan Confederacy of Belize, Guatemala, and Honduras, who was active in interfaith work, and had several meaningful encounters with modern Pagans in the United States, passed away this past Saturday. Don Frew, a National Interfaith Representative for the Covenant of the Goddess, on relaying the news of his death, said he and Pixtun were “spiritual brothers” and that “Tata was always supportive of CoG’s interfaith work and helped usp make connections with other indigenous representatives.”

Guatemalan Mayan elder Apolinario Chile Pixtun

Guatemalan Mayan elder Apolinario Chile Pixtun

You can read all of my reporting on Apolinario Chile Pixtun’s interactions with modern Pagans, here. COG Interfaith reports also has several related articles on this subject worth reading. What is remembered, lives.

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

There are lots of articles and essays of interest to modern Pagans out there, sometimes more than our team can write about in-depth in any given week. So The Wild Hunt must unleash the hounds in order to round them all up.

Peter Matthiessen

Peter Matthiessen

  • Noted naturalist and author Peter Matthiessen died on Saturday after battling leukemia. Mattheiseen, a Zen Buddhist, wrote over 30 novels, was an environmental activist, co-founded the Paris Review, and famously wrote “In the Spirit of Crazy Horse,” which chronicled the story of Leonard Peltier. Quote: “Matthiessen is held in such high regard as a nonfiction writer by nonfiction writers that they sometimes say, ‘How is it possible that this guy can be such a virtuoso fiction writer, and give his equally substantial body of nonfiction work such short shrift?’ Because all the rest of us are trying to do what we can to mimic his nonfiction work.” What is remembered, lives.
  • Two people in Western Kentucky have been arrested on charges of committing sexual offenses against children. One of them, Jessica M. Smith, allegedly described herself as a Witch and threatened the children with her powers. Quote: “Prosecutors say the two threatened the children with ‘hexes and curses’ […] Police said Smith described herself as a witch and told the kids ‘she was going to put a spell on them’ and that ‘if they told anyone, something bad would happen to them.'”
  • A federal appeals panel has ruled that New York City has the right to block religious services in public schools. Quote: “The decision does not mean that the city must force religious groups out of the schools, but merely that a city prohibition on religious worship services in schools would comply with the Constitution.” Appeals are expected.
  • It seems that “real housewife” Carlton Gebbia isn’t the only reality television star who has practiced Wicca. It seems that Millionaire Matchmaker star Patti Stanger was a “real Wiccan” for six years. Quote: “I’ve studied Kabbalah, I’ve studied Wicca, so you can’t be like that. You can’t throw stones at people, because karmically it’s going to come back to you even worse then you threw it at them.”
  • Is the Internet destroying religion? A new study makes the case that the rise of the Internet has been an important factor in individuals abandoning traditional forms of religious practice. Quote: “Today, we get a possible answer thanks to the work of Allen Downey, a computer scientist at the Olin College of Engineering in Massachusetts, who has analyzed the data in detail. He says that the demise is the result of several factors but the most controversial of these is the rise of the Internet. He concludes that the increase in Internet use in the last two decades has caused a significant drop in religious affiliation.” Of course, correlation is not causation, but Downey says that “correlation does provide evidence in favor of causation, especially when we can eliminate alternative explanations or have reason to believe that they are less likely.”
Terence Spencer—The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images

Terence Spencer—The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images

That’s it for now! Feel free to discuss any of these links in the comments, some of these we may expand into longer posts as needed.

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

fortean_times_12856_12Steve Moore, an author and occultist who helped found Fortean Times, passed away earlier this month. Moore worked extensively with famed comic writer Alan Moore (no relation), who credited him with learning how to write comic scripts. The Strange Attractor journal, to which Moore was a regular contributor, has posted a moving tribute. Quote: “Steve was a warm, wise and gentle man, with a surreal sense of humour and an astoundingly deep knowledge that covered history, the I Ching, forteana, magic, oriental mysticism, martial arts cinema, science fiction, underground comics and worlds more. Steve was amongst the earliest members of the Gang of Fort, who launched Fortean Timesmagazine in the early 1970s, and later edited its scholarly journal Fortean Studies. He was also the author of a great many influential comics and short stories for publications.” What is remembered, lives.

510KxQLOMyL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Anthropologist Murphy Pizza’s history and ethnography of Minnesota’s Twin Cities Pagan community, dubbed “Paganistan,” will be published by Ashgate Press in April. Quote: “The story of the community traces the formation of some of the earliest organizations and churches in the US, the influence of publication houses and bookstores, the marketplace, and the local University, on the growth and sustenance of a distinct Pagan community identity, as well as discussions of the patterns of diversifying and cohesion that occur as a result of societal pressure, politics, and generational growth within it. As the first ever study of this long-lived community, this book sets out to document Paganistan as another aspect of the increasing prevalence of Paganism in the US and contributes to the discussion of the formation of new American religious communities.” This will no doubt be required reading for many. You can find the Amazon.com listing, here. The hardcover is pretty spend-y, so you might want to await the paperback edition.

2014-03-15 08.46.12Sacred Space Conference board member Caroline Kenner has posted an overview of the recently held East Coast event at The Witches’ Voice. Quote: “2014 marks Sacred Space’s 24th year, an extravaganza of classes and rituals designed for an audience of intermediate to advanced magical practitioners. Each year, Sacred Space hosts national presenters as well as local teachers. This year, M. Macha Nightmare, Selena Fox and Orion Foxwood were our featured talent, and sponsored guests Jason Pitzl-Waters and Renna Shesso also joined us. We were delighted to welcome back Selena and Orion in particular: they both presented at the first conference of Sacred Space’s most recent incarnation, held in 2008. This year, we were able to give them a much larger and more vigorous audience for their teaching.” You can listen to the Appalachian Folk Traditions panel from Sacred Space here at The Wild Hunt.

In Other Pagan Community News: 

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

“We cannot effectively advocate that which we do not live. We must practice what we preach, before we begin to preach it. Our way of doing things is an integral part of our difference from the mainstream and so of the message we have been called forth to bring.”Judy Harrow

Judy Harrow

Judy Harrow

On Friday, word emerged slowly through Facebook and private correspondences that Judy Harrow, Wiccan Elder, Pagan community organizer, counselor, and author, had unexpectedly passed in her sleep. While Harrow may not have been as high-profile as some prominent individuals within our community, she had been hugely influential, laying the groundwork for many of the projects, institutions, and modes of thought we now associate with our movement.

Coming to Gardnerian Witchcraft in the middle 1970s, Harrow went on to co-found Proteus Coven, a theologically liberal manifestation of her tradition. Shortly after this, Proteus Coven affiliated with the newly-formed Covenant of the Goddess, with Harrow serving in a number of leadership roles within the national organization in the 1980s. In 1985, she was the first member of COG to be legally registered as clergy in New York City. Founding the Pagan Pastoral Counseling Network in 1982, she would go on to head the Pastoral Care and Counseling Department at Cherry Hill Seminary. In addition, Harrow did important outreach work within the fields of professional counseling and interfaith.

Judy Harrow was also active in media and publishing, producing the weekly radio feature “Reconnections,” which concerned progressive religious groups, for WBAI in New York, and authoring two books. These were “Wicca Covens: How to Start and Organize Your Own” and “Spiritual Mentoring: A Pagan Guide.” Harrow also edited the collection “Devoted To You: Honoring Deity in Wiccan Practice.”

Since word emerged of her passing on Friday, a number of tributes have been written, from both organizations and individuals within our interconnected movement.

“The Covenant of the Goddess takes a quiet moment to say farewell to one of its long-time members and elders as she crosses. Judy Harrow was instrumental in expanding CoG’s reach from its birthplace in Northern California to the East Coast. She helped to establish the North East Local Council that assisted the growing number of Wiccans and Witches in that area. Judy was also a dedicated National Board member and one of the only East Coast members in attendance at the very first Merry Meet in 1981.  Judy’s work for CoG was only a small part of who she was and of what she contributed to the growth and well-being of the Pagan community. In all her efforts, Judy was keenly aware that history was being made step-by-step. On this day in early spring, we honor all that she did, all that she was and all the beauty in the legacy that she left. What’s remembered lives. And what lives, will bloom forever.”The Covenant of the Goddess

“Judy was involved from our early years, forming and chairing the first Department of Pagan Pastoral Counseling, pushing the organization to begin aligning our training with professional requirements at a time when most Pagans still only concerned themselves with coven secrets and ritual cycles. Without her wise shaping of the program, I can’t imagine what CHS would look like now. Judy was a gifted teacher, as both our students and scores of her own lineage will attest. To thank and honor her, CHS several years ago named our online library the Judy Harrow Library. True to form, she was pleased but surprised by the fuss and wanted us to keep the title as simple as possible.”Holli Emore, Executive Director, Cherry Hill Seminary

Judy Harrow & Margot Adler. Photo by Lisa Bodo.

Judy Harrow & Margot Adler. Photo by Lisa Bodo.

“She was the only one of the members of our small Gardnerian coven, iargolon, who carried the flame far and wide, creating so many groups that everywhere I go, I get, ‘Hello Grandma, I’m downline!'”Margot Adler, author of “Drawing Down The Moon.”

“I am so sorry to hear of Judy’s passing! Judy was one of the first people I met in the Craft outside the Bay Area, many, many years ago. To me she was an example of someone who could bring together the magical disciplines with psychology and psychotherapy and her own abundant trove of common sense. She never lost sight of the need tor our groups and covens to learn group dynamics and community building skills. She is a true elder and one of the early trailblazers for the Pagan movement, and she will be deeply missed!”Starhawk

“I first met Judy many years ago, in the late 1980s, when I lived in western Masschusetts. She attended events with various groups I knew at the time, including larger festivals, traveling from the New York City area to gather with others. I remember her as being opinionated, feisty and a true firebrand; like so many of our pagan elders, the burgeoning pagan movement was an exciting space to explore and Judy was a major figure in the growth of that movement. […] As we grow older and our pagan elders pass away (including Donald Michael Kraig earlier this week), may we never forget how these strong and spirited people forged paths and inroads for all of us, and may we continue to learn from their example and honor their work. Go in peace Judy, and may your lively conversations continue with those who have gone on before.”Peg Aloi, The Witching Hour, and The Witches’ Voice

“Oh, there’s so much more to say about Judy and her life!  Others have told their Judy stories elsewhere.  There’s plenty of drama to go round.  In my experience, however, over many years and many projects, Judy maintained the ability to keep her eye on the prize.  Regardless of personal disagreements — and they could be long and heated and irresolvable — Judy made sure we kept our focus on the goal toward which we were striving.  Her life influenced many people, from teaching coveners to getting NYC to accept CoG’s credentials, from writing a Wiccan chaplains’ manual for the military to schmoozing with world religious leaders in Barcelona, from dancing round a bonfire to helping create a respected Pagan seminary. Knowing Judy has enriched my life beyond measure.  She was a Pagan pioneer.  If you knew her, you know all this.  If you didn’t know her in life, know that her work has advanced our religions and made our futures more assured and comfortable.  She has blessed us all. Judy went to the simmering cauldron of emerging American Paganism and added something every once in a while.  Then she’d stir it to mix it all in and to keep stuff from sticking on the bottom.”M. Macha NightMare (Aline O’Brien)

“I first met Judy very late on a May evening in 1979, when I picked her up along with another friend at the Trailways Bus terminal in Framingham, MA. She had come to attend the first Rites of Spring gathering, the first large pagan festival that either of us had ever been part of. We became friends that weekend, and occasional collaborators in the years since, founding (along with a few other people) the North East Local Council of Covenant of the Goddess, and participating in a spirited panel discussion on pagan clergy in FireHeart magazine, among other things. Judy went on to become a psychotherapist, an author, the founder of the Protean tradition, and a member of the faculty of Cherry Hill Seminary. I have fond memories of the brief time we spent together in Barcelona during the 2004 Parliament of the World’s Religions, though it was painfully obvious even then that she was in poor health. I will never forget Judy telling me once how very important it was for us to always be mindful that we were writing pagan history — that one day we would be remembered as ancestors by future generations, so we needed to leave them some really good stories. Judy has now officially become part of that history, and joined the ranks of the ancestors. Farewell, my friend, I will miss you.”Andras Corban Arthen, EarthSpirit

“I am thankful for Judy, for our friendship, and for her many contributions to Paganism, to Interfaith relations, and to the Mental Health Professionals realm.  I cherish memories of our good times together at Pagan conferences and festivals over the years, and at the 2004 Parliament of the World’s Religions in Barcelona, Spain.  May her bright spirit, writings, and wisdom continue to support, encourage, and inspire.”Selena Fox, Circle Sanctuary

“I want to write about Judy, but it’s too hard. It’s like I’m standing too close to something, trying to take a picture. Nothing comes into focus. It’s all too big to fit into the frame. She was family. I guess that’s what it comes down to. She could be maddening; she could be irascible. She sang off key; she made mistakes. She had the most astonishing students you could imagine; she wassmart and disciplined and passionate, and she adored reaching out to people she imagined might be more those things than she was. She was righteous to a fault, absolutely dedicated to Pagan movement and the Craft, and probably constitutionally incapable of compromising her ethics. She loved scholarship and scholars, she loved innovation and music… and she loved her community.”Cat Chapin-Bishop

“The 1990s were a time of testing boundaries, of high magic and higher tempers. From those fields rose a handful of patient and brilliant teachers, who were also visionaries about the future of these strange spiritual systems and their place in the modern world. Judy Harrow was one of those teachers, one of those visionaries. We have been blessed by her work for many years and her death leaves a hole in our springtime world. We won’t see her like again.”Byron Ballard

This is but a sampling, as I know that many more are who have been touched by her work and life are penning tributes and obituaries to this remarkable individual. As the days progress, I will spotlight them as they emerge. As for me, my interactions with Judy Harrow have been brief, but were weighted with the great admiration and respect I held for her. We overlapped a bit at Cherry Hill Seminary when I sat on their board for a short time, and I got to make her acquaintance at a PantheaCon some years ago. I remember she was quite frail at that meeting, having recently emerged from a long medical ordeal, but well enough to give me a hug and tell me that I looked far friendlier in person than in my sometimes severe online portraits. I was worried then that we would lose her, but she rallied and remained a strong presence in our community for years to come.  Now that she has truly left us, I find myself wishing I had found the time to speak with her more, to learn from her history more, to step aside from my deadlines and drink deeply of her experience.

Losing Donald Michael Kraig and Judy Harrow in the same week draws attention to the fact that our elders, teachers, and visionaries are a precious resource that we can lose at any moment. Some, we are prepared for, and some hit us hard, but all take with them their vibrant spirit, though they may leave their teachings and legacies. This should be a moment of awakening for us, to truly honor those who blazed the trails we now seek to travel on, to preserve as much as we can of their work and life for future generations. We have the means, technology, and ability to do this work, all we need to do is find the time and will. There are some nascent projects on this front, but we need more.

As for Judy Harrow, you will never be forgotten. You have enriched us, you have fought for us, and you have given your life in service to our faiths. You live still with us, especially with the many Witches you’ve shaped. Rest now in the arms of the gods and return to us again.