Archives For FaerieCon

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Cara Schulz

Cara Schulz

Earlier this month I gave an overview of Cara Schulz’s candidacy for a city council seat in Burnsville, Minnesota. Schulz, a Hellenic Polytheist and staff writer for this publication, has long been active in politics. As a candidate for this non-partisan seat she has endorsed a “Socially Accepting and Fiscally Responsible” platform, and it looks like enough voters in Burnsville liked what they saw. Quote from her Facebook campaign page: “THANK YOU to everyone who volunteered, told their friends about me, and are heading to the polls today to vote. If you think people are selfish, not involved, or lazy … run for office – you will be disabused of those erroneous notions. I’ve been offered help before I could even ask and volunteers helped an insane number of hours. I’ve made some great friends and learned from kind mentors. I’ve met some incredible people from all over Burnsville. [...] The final tally is in! Thank you to everyone who volunteered, sent me messages cheering me on, told others about me, and took the time to vote in the primary.” Schulz will now advance to the general election in November, where the top-two vote getters will fill the two vacant seats on the city council. Our congratulations go out to Cara! 

10557341_10203741099061740_6626525900185221594_nAuthor and Dianic Witchcraft Elder Zsuzsanna Budapest sent out a press release last week announcing that she had bestowed a blessing on Claudiney Prieto, part of Brazil’s Nemorensis Dianic Tradition, for his work on behalf of the goddess Isis. Quote: “I was greatly impressed by Claudiney Prieto in Brazil, who has successfully nurtured an Isis revival. I have blessed him to be a Priest of Isis, which he already is. I saw what he has done and I think he serves the Goddess with his personal leadership. Everybody loves the man. He is dynamite in circle. Such a man with ten years of experience richly deserves the blessing. Both sexes are part of the rituals and sacred plays and always have been. This fits us well. I connect with this because I am also a play write. The original Isis plays have all been translated. It will be great fun creating a religious experience within the medium of theater for this community.” Budapest went on to clearly state that this blessing was not a shift in her beliefs concerning gender and her tradition’s Dianic rituals. Quote: “Although there was some initial confusion about the blessing, it was clarified that he was awarded by her as an honoring of his work with the Goddess [...]  Budapest honored Prieto and bound him as a priest to the Goddess within the constructs of Prieto’s own Nemorensis Dianic Tradition and not her own Dianic Tradition, which is women-born only.” The stated “confusion” and subsequent clarification is most likely related to the fact that Budapest’s form of Dianic Witchcraft is open to cisgender women only, and this blessing could have been interpreted as a move away from that ethos. Such a shift would have been dramatic news indeed, as Budapest has received criticism from within the Pagan community in the recent past for holding “genetic women only” rituals that exclude not just men, but also transgender women, at Pagan events that are open to the public.

green-faiths-3atransThe Covenant of the Goddess (COG), one of the largest Wiccan and Witchcraft-focused organizations in the United States, is holding their annual business meeting, the Grand Council, this week in Atlanta, Georgia. Grand Council, which is held in conjunction with an open-to-the-public event called Merry Meet, is where the sprawling consensus-based organization elects its board and decides on policy. I’ve personally held forth on why I think COG could have a vital role in Wicca and religious Witchcraft’s future, and The Wild Hunt has covered these meetings for the past three years. This year, Merry Meet will feature Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary as a special keynote speaker. Quote: “We are very excited to have Selena Fox as our Guest of Honor for Merry Meet 2014 and as our Friday Night Keynote Speaker. Selena has been a leader and mover in Interfaith for many years and has worked, and continues to work, tirelessly within the Interfaith Community. Join us for what is sure to be a lovely evening of good food, camaraderie, and our shared passion for ‘Standing on Common Ground’!” Stay tuned for a report on the event from Managing Editor Heather Greene in the near future.

In Other Pagan Community News:

  • Polytheist and spirit-worker Sarah Kate Istra Winter has announced the publication of a short booklet on working with animal bones. Quote: “Working with Animal Bones introduces the reader to the biological processes which form bone; gives advice on how to find bones in a natural setting, and subsequently identify and thoroughly clean them; discusses the types of crafts that can be made with bones; and explores the history and modern practices involving the sacred use of animal bones, including divination. An annotated bibliography and list of online resources for collectors are also included.” The book can be purchased at Etsy, or on Amazon.com.

img_3163

  • Over at the Patheos Pagan channel, The Staff of Asclepius blog has welcomed two new contributors: Nornoriel Lokason and CJ Blackwood. Quote: “Nornoriel Lokason is a thirtysomething Norse pagan and demonolater living in the Portland metropolitan area with spirits and a cat [...] Nornoriel is a disability and LGBT rights advocate and in his spare time he enjoys thrifting, communing with nature, reading, and being an armchair historian. [...] CJ Blackwood graduated from Illinois State University with a Bachelor’s in journalism and a minor in English [...] She’s been a practing witch and Pagan for eight years. Her path began with eclectic Wicca, but has now taken her to dusky realms of warrior goddesses, creative goddesses, and crones.”
  • Hungarian Pagan band The Moon and the Nightspirit have released a new album entitled “Holdrejtek.” Quote: “Just like its predecessor ‘Mohalepte’, ‘Holdrejtek’ is much influenced by a deep veneration for and love of nature as far as its concept is concerned, while this time, mastermind Mihaly Szabo approaches the subject in a less romantic and more intellectual way. The lyrics are rife with the philosophical idea of simultaneous oneness and duality of micro- and macrocosm, which is attributed to Hermes Trismegistos and his screed ‘Tabula Smaragdina’.” You can purchase the album digitally on iTunes and at Amazon.com.

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Art and Tarot

Jason Pitzl-Waters —  February 25, 2014 — 5 Comments

While I love attending PantheaCon year after year, it certainly doesn’t exist in a vacuum of Spring events. This is particularly true for me, as the very next weekend I found myself in Seattle working at FaerieCon West in Seattle. I’ve been a part of Faerieworlds Events for a couple years now, working on event programming, and they are truly vibrant gatherings that should please any Pagan who loves art, music, performance, and craft. This year, I was honored to moderate a panel of artists who have created tarot and oracle decks. The panel included Stephanie Pui-Mun Law, creator of the Shadowscapes TarotLinda Ravenscroft, illustrator of the Mystic Faerie Tarot, and Amy Brown, who created the Faery Wisdom oracle deck with her mother.

Amy Brown, Linda Ravenscroft, and Stephanie Pui-Mun Law

Amy Brown, Linda Ravenscroft, and Stephanie Pui-Mun Law

We discussed the creation process, their experience with tarot and oracle decks, and future projects. Later in the panel with were joined by Satyros Phil Brucato, who is working with Stephanie Pui-Mun Law on a new oracle deck. I was lucky to record the entire panel, and you can listen to it at Soundcloud (or embedded below).

Often with tarot decks we speak with the writers and experts who craft meanings from the commissioned images, so I think it is important to give voice to the artists and illustrators who bring these tools to life, who make them into true art objects. Whatever their level of commitment in the creation process, without the art these decks would lose their impact, their connection to deeper symbolic pathways.

The Hermit, by Stephanie Pui-Mun Law.

The Hermit, by Stephanie Pui-Mun Law.

I continue my work with FaerieCon for exactly these confluences of talent, these instances of connection and inspiration. While formal Pagan events often have a lot going for them, sometimes, when you cross into the borderlands where Paganism intersects with other cultures, and subcultures, you can enter into circumstances that enrich you in ways you might not anticipate. I’d like to thank the artists for taking the time to share their stories and creation process with me this past weekend. Enjoy the panel!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Air N-AithescA new peer-reviewed magazine focused on Celtic Reconstructionist Paganism has debuted. Air n-Aithesc: Our Message, a joint project conceived by a committee featuring C. Lee Vermeers, Saigh Kym Lambert, Maya St.Clair, Donna Donovan, Blackbird O’Connell, Ceffyl Aedui, Morgan Daimler, Finnchuill, and Skullarix, looks to “offer well researched material for Celtic Reconstructionists and others who value the role of academics as much as they value the role of the spiritual in their practice.” According to the site, the magazine’s main aim is “to offer as many resources as possible, from research articles to in depth explorations of how personal experiences fit in with the sources,  book reviews, and much more.” You can purchase the first issue at MagCloud.

CornerstoneThe Pantheon Foundation was not the only Pagan organization that had a big coming-out at this year’s PantheaCon, this was also the year of the Cornerstone Pagan Fellowship, which hosted a hospitality suite, and seeks to “provide regular spiritual and meditation services but also provide a community center for members to assemble, study, and learn; for other Pagan groups to use for their services; and for educators to utilize as a spiritual resource. Local congregations may provide spiritual counseling, childcare, private schooling, community outreach, social services, food banks or other services if they have qualified staff on hand.”  President Jessie Olson says that “Cornerstone is more than just a church, it is an entire movement, one we really believe has the potential to change the history of Paganism.” The new organization says they follow the teachings of Isaac Bonewits, and that, quote, “we feel there is a real shortage of community service and charity organizations run by Pagan organizations in the community.” 

cropped-PconBanner13aWere you at PantheaCon 2014? Do you have some opinions about it? Things you loved? Things you wish to see improved? Then head over to the event’s website and fill out a feedback form. Quote: “If you attended PantheaCon 2014, we’d like to hear from you. We’ve created a feedback form to better understand your experience attending the conference. It will take about five minutes to complete.  If the link above doesn’t work for you, please enter the following URL in your browser: http://sgiz.mobi/s3/3ddacf2d2f9c Thank you so much for attending!  Check back later this year for more information about PantheaCon 2015.” So, for example, if you wish the hotel would offer more vegan items, and maybe learn how to cook tofu, or if you just want to praise the efficient and hard-working tech team, this is your chance!

In Other Pagan Community News:

  • Speaking of the Pantheon Foundation, which I wrote about last week, their official website has been launched. More on Pantheon, and The Wild Hunt, coming soon. Quote: “Our mission is to provide IRS group exemptions for Pagan organizations through fiscal sponsorship, develop Pagan ministry, study the history, promote the culture, and advance the social welfare of Pagans and the Pagan community.”
  • Pagan-friendly musical project Metal Mother has premiered a new video from her album “Ionika,” a track entitled “Mind_Off.” Quote: “This story exists in black, dense, empty space. A void. Cult dancers and future-spun techno clans surge in new warriors and new lyfe. We are privileged to this strange moment in this strange space and what we learn is more about what does and does not happen rather than why it is happening. Strange battles, strange visions, strange love.”

  • Lilith Dorsey lets us know that there’s a fundraising effort underway to help restore Marie Laveau’s tomb after it was painted pink by a vandal. Quote: “According to the site, Save Our Cemeteries, the Archdiocese of New Orleans and the local preservation company Bayou Preservation LLC have banded together to raise the monumental $10,000 or more that is required to complete the restoration. Every bit counts, I’ve made my donation, will you?”
  • Pagan author and activist Starhawk is co-conducting a workshop this weekend at Esalen (a famous New Age watering hole) on “Creating Transformative Communities.” Quote: “During this workshop, we’ll explore how to structure groups for maximum group health, how to share power fairly, improve our communication skills, mediate conflicts, and facilitate group processes. We’ll share tools for decision making and constructive critique.”
  • Tired of everyone talking about PantheaCon? Well, here are some upcoming Pagan or Pagan-friendly events we can talk about instead: ConVocation in Michigan starts February 20th, featuring SJ Tucker and Margot Adler, FaerieCon West in Seattle starts February 21st, featuring Faun, John Matthews, T. Thorn Coyle, and Charles de Lint. Plus, both Paganicon in Minnesota and Sacred Space Conference in Maryland are coming in March.

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Modrzyk MemoriesOn February 5th, it was reported that Stanley Modrzyk (1945 – 2014), founder & High Priest of the first Temple of the Craft of W.I.C.A., had passed away. Modrzyk was the author of two books on Wiccan practice, and was one of the founding members of the Midwest Pagan Council and of the Pan Pagan Festival, one of the first and oldest running festivals in the Midwest United States from which Pagan Spirit Gathering and Chrysalis Moon got their start. A longtime activist for his faith in the Midwest, Stanley made many media appearances, and organized to stop faux-witch-burnings during Halloween celebrations in the Chicago area. A wake will be held on Feb. 14th from 2-8pm at Joseph Nosek and Sons Funeral Home, 6716 W. 16th Street in Berwyn, IL. In lieu of flowers, the family is asking that people donate to JDRF -Junior Diabetic Research Fund or The Chicago Lighthouse. The family is asking those that cannot make the wake to light a candle for him on Friday, Feb. 14th at 7pm. Stanley Modrzyk is survived by his wife, Dorothy, and daughter, Lizzy, who are both active within the Craft. Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary and Pagan Spirit Gathering said that she is “thankful for his many positive contributions to the Craft & Paganism.” What is remembered, lives.

1484086_253554558146286_1250339820_nA new Pagan organization has formed, one dedicated to supporting infrastructure and developing small Pagan institutions. Quote: “Announcing the Pantheon Foundation: building 21st Century Pagan infrastructure. We are a California non-profit religious corporation applying for 501(c)(3) status with the IRS. Our mission is to provide IRS group exemptions for Pagan organizations through fiscal sponsorship, develop Pagan ministry, study the history, promote the culture, and advance the social welfare of Pagans and the Pagan community.” Pantheon Foundation will be holding a reception at PantheaCon 2014 this weekend, Saturday, 9pm, in Suite 1060. One of its main functions, providing fiscal sponsorship, will directly benefit The Wild Hunt, and once final paperwork is done, donations to this site will be tax-deductible. Co-founder Sam Webster says that, quote, “we have finally built a Pagan religious non-profit organization to serve the many needs of our community and provide legal coverage for our small organizations.” More announcements will be forthcoming, for those who can’t be at PantheaCon.

polytheist leadership conferenceLast week I mentioned that a proposed Polytheist Leadership Conference was moving forward, now, co-organizer Galina Krasskova elaborates further on plans at the Witches & Pagans Magazine site. Quote: “The Polytheist Leadership Conference will take place Friday, July 11th through Sunday, July 13th – though we’ve made arrangements so that you can get the block room rate if you want to come in earlier on Thursday. We’ll begin on Friday at 3:00pm with an opening prayer to our collective dead and polytheist predecessors and then have a lecture and roundtable discussion with the rest of the evening devoted to socializing and networking. We’ll start at 10:00am on Saturday with a full day of workshops, lectures and roundtable discussions ending at 8:00pm. There’ll be half hour breaks between each session and an extended lunch and dinner. Sunday begins at 10:00am and has two sessions with a social lunch and then a closing ceremony at 3:00pm.” An official website is now up so attendees can register. You can also find further details there about the conference.

In Other Pagan Community News:

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Greetings! I won’t be able to do a normal update today, because I’m currently in Baltimore, Maryland, for FaerieCon East. I’ve been honored to work for the producers of FaerieCon for a few years now, and it’s a unique mix of art, music, and mythic elements. I think there are many things (and people) on display here that would be of interest to modern Pagans, and indeed, many Pagans already love this event and make a point of attending (and maybe you will too, someday). To tide you all over, I’d like to quickly share some photos I took on Friday, and make a promise to write a longer update on my weekend at a later date.

Artist Julia Jeffrey, who recently illustrated the Tarot of the Hidden Realm.

Artist Julia Jeffrey, who recently illustrated the Tarot of the Hidden Realm.

Raven Grimassi and Stephanie Taylor Grimassi at their booth at FaerieCon East.

Raven Grimassi and Stephanie Taylor Grimassi at their booth at FaerieCon East.

Woodland playing at the Good Faeries Masquerade Ball at FaerieCon East (you'll be hearing more about them soon).

Woodland playing at the Good Faeries Masquerade Ball at FaerieCon East (you’ll be hearing more about them soon).

Martine Kraft playing at the Good Faeries Masquerade Ball at FaerieCon East.

Martine Kraft playing at the Good Faeries Masquerade Ball at FaerieCon East.

That’s all I have time for today, have a great day, and I’ll return soon… (unless I return and it’s a 100 years later, you know how that fae stuff works sometimes…)

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Cherry Hill SeminaryPagan learning institution Cherry Hill Seminary has announced their Fall Scholarship Drive for 2013, which will help fund tuition scholarships in January. Quote: “‘I can’t imagine a world without Cherry Hill Seminary,’ said Executive Director Holli Emore.  She also emphasized the efficient operation of the nearly 15-year-old school.  ‘Fortunately for our students, cash to keep the lights on translates directly into vibrant, rich learning opportunities.  That’s why an end of the year gift to the Bow Tie Campaign will allow us to give real scholarships out in January.  CHS operates on a cash basis – no debt! – so we need your help to finish the year.’” The institution’s goal is to raise $5000 dollars between now and Yule. When the goal of $5,000 is reached, Cherry Hill Seminary will announce a process for applying for a one-course scholarship.  More about the fund drive can be found here. I’ve embedded their fundraising video below.

Brendan Myers

Brendan Myers

Another fundraising initiative has recently launched, this one to create a tabletop role-playing game based on The Fellwater Tales, a fantasy book series authored by Brendan Myers, a Quebec Druidic Humanist and Philosophy Professor. Quote: “‘The Fellwater Tales’ features characters who are caught in a conflict between rival factions of a secret society, whose members are descended from ancient gods. While dealing with their own personal problems, they also struggle to protect Fellwater Grove, one of the last remaining places on earth where the magic of the Mythic Age still survives. The ‘Secret People’ of the ‘Hidden Houses’, as they are called, compete with each other for control of such places, just as political factions in the real world compete for control of sea ports, oil fields, and markets.” If funded, the project will involve several artists, including Morpheus Ravenna. The campaign seeks to raise $10,250 dollars in a month. Perks include copies of the game, copies of the books in the Fallwater Tales series, and the opportunity to have your own character included in the game.

AdflogoThis Samhain marked a special anniversary, the 30th year since Ár nDraíocht Féin: A Druid Fellowship (ADF) was founded. ADF Archdruid Kirk Thomas issued the following statement in commemoration of the event: “At a Samhain rite at the Winterstar Symposium held in 1983, Isaac Bonewits, a scholar, visionary, and teacher, announced the formation of a new religion, Ar nDraiocht Fein (ADF). Issac’s idea for ADF was revolutionary for its time. His path-making vision was to see ADF certified clergy in every major city and be recognized as a true world religion. The letter that announced the forming of ADF and what it was all about was written it the first “Druids Progress.” In it, he outlined his concept of ADF as a fluid and dynamic religion, evolving and adapting ancient Pagan faiths in a modern context for his generation and continuing to evolve with the ones to follow. This Samhain marks our 30th Anniversary! Today, ADF is thriving, as generations of members grow up in the path, and are passing it on to the next generation. From it’s humble beginnings, there is now a solid core order of worship. There are currently 26 certified ordained clergy; 74 groves (congregations) in the United States, Canada, the UK, Australia, and Brazil with members on 6 continents; and numerous festivals held all around the United States and Canada every year. Happy Anniversary, ADF!”

In Other Pagan Community News: 

  • A Hellenic Revival Festival in Louisiana is being planned for 2014. Quote: “Hellenic polytheists to invade South Louisiana! Thessaly Temenos, located in the Bayou Regions of South Louisiana has announced its sponsorship of a Hellenic Revival Festival to be held on their ritual grounds. The date for the festival is set for November 8th and 9th of 2014 and is being promoted as an exclusively Hellenic event – not a pan-pagan gathering.” You can find more information, here.
  • Operation Circle Care, sponsored by Circle Sanctuary, is underway once more. Quote: “At Yuletide and throughout the year, Circle Sanctuary sends care packages with Pagan books, magazines, CDs, and other spiritual resources to Wiccans and other Pagans on active duty who are currently serving overseas (both on PCS and Deployment). You can help this effort by sending us donations of new and nearly new items as well as funds to cover air mail postage.” Donation and contact information can be found, here.
  • Pagan photographer Greg Harder has a ton of cool photos up from Day of the Dead celebration at the Oakland Museum of California. Check it out!
  • This weekend is FaerieCon East in Baltimore, featuring Pagan authors Raven Grimassi and Stephanie Taylor-Grimassi, along with a large number of amazing mythic authors and artists. Of special interest will be a Sunday panel on creating tarot and oracle decks featuring Raven and Stephanie, Julia Jeffrey, Caroline Kenner of Fool’s Dog, and Gary Lippincott.

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

conference-logo-transparent-background1The Conference on Current Pagan Studies has announced that author (and Wild Hunt columnist) Crystal Blanton will be one of the keynote speakers at their 2014 conference this coming February. At her official Facebook page, Blanton asked followers which of three topics they would prefer she address with her keynote; the effect of racism within the Pagan community, the different forms of axiology within ethnic cultures and how that applies to the assessment of value within the Pagan community, or understanding cultural sensitivity and the need for collective healing for healthy racial integration within Paganism. Each of these topics would fit in well with 2014′s theme of “Relationships With The World.” Quote: “What is our relationship as contemporary pagans with the rest of the world at this point in history? What is the nature of our relationship with ourselves? With others? With the Divine? Who do we reach out to? Who do we support? What kind of communities are we building? As we ask for acceptance, who are we accepting? Who do we reject? Who do we love? Who do we make the enemy?” The deadline for paper proposals is September 15th.

booktitleProlific indie esoteric filmmaker Antero Alli has a new movie coming out called The Book of Jane that explores mythic themes and the idea of fate. Quote: “Alice, a Professor of Comparative Religion, is writing a book exalting the ancient values of pre-Hellenic goddess mythologies and Feminine deity worship. One day she meets Jane, an enigmatic older woman who roams the university campus, sleeps under a bridge, and rattles Alice with her disturbing insights. At home, Alice is the muse to her partner Colette, an artist who is painting a series of goddess portraits. When Colette hears about Jane, she encourages a reluctant Alice to invite her over for dinner. “The Book of Jane” is a story of three women bound together by fate to advance the values of an ancient culture into contempory life — at a deep cost no one expected.” Making an appearance as the goddess Morrigan is artist, teacher, and spiritual worker Morpheus Ravenna. You can watch a clip featuring her embedded below, or simply click here.

pcThe Centre for Pagan Studies and the Doreen Valiente Foundation have announced that they will be holding a one-day Witchcraft conference in honor of Patricia Crowther on April 6th, 2014, in Nottingham. Quote: “We are continuing our series of ‘A Day For . . ‘ events and this year we will be honouring the achievements and contribution to the Witchcraft and Pagan community of Patricia Crowther. Patricia is one of the few remaining contemporaries of Gerald Gardner and has to be considered one of the true Elders of the Craft. She was initially reluctant to allow us to hold a day in her honour but we have persuaded her that the Craft and pagan communities deserve their chance to pay her their respects and celebrate her so we are very pleased to announce that all being well she will be our guest of honour on the day. We will also present talks by Vivianne & Chris Crowley, Rufus & Melissa Harrington, Philip Heselton and Patricia’s good friend and astronomy expert, John Harper.” You can purchase advance tickets now. You can also download and share a flyer if you wish. If I were in the UK, I would love to attend this, so don’t miss out!

In Other Pagan Community News:

  • Initial guests and bands have been announced for FaerieCon West in Seattle, including German Pagan-folk band Faun, and authors John Matthews (see our recent interview with him), Raven Grimassi, and Stephanie Taylor-Grimassi. The event takes place February 21-23rd (the weekend after PantheaCon), and has moved to the Seattle Doubletree Hilton. For those on the East Coast, FaerieCon East in Baltimore is coming up November 8th – 10th, and also features a lot of wonderful guests. Full disclosure: I work for the company that produces these events, but I think their quality stands up even if you account for my conflict of interest.
  • An IndieGoGo crowdfunding campaign has been launched for a new online magazine called Limina. Quote: “Limina is an online magazine of women writing about faith. The word Limina means ‘she who is standing on the threshold.’ We hope to explore matters of faith, culture, politics, and arts from that position. We are diverse and inclusive, representing many religions, spiritualities, and faith traditions, as well as atheists and agnostics. We take our voices seriously, we take our position seriously, and we honor the work of those who came before us and made what we do possible. But we can be irreverent at times. We’re here to engage readers, and to make them think, and occasionally, to prod them into action.” I’ve spoken with one of the organizers, and she says they are planning to include several Pagan voices. I’ve embedded their pitch-video below.

  • Funds are currently being raised to create an Avalon. Quote: “Thanks for taking the time to visit our JustGiving page.  We’re fundraising to create a sacred grove in Avalon, in a small but beautiful privately-owned field right on the slopes of Glastonbury Tor.  It’ll be formed of a circle of twenty-four trees, mostly Apple, with Rowan marking the four entrances and Oak standing as guardians around the space.  Aromatic herbs on the ground and evergreen plants  all around will give atmosphere and privacy.  It’s still a mystery what will go in the centre – perhaps a small pool, perhaps a fire dish: it’ll become clear as the project unfolds.” One of the co-organizers of this project is author Sorita d’Este.
  • Alane Brown, Witch, and composer for the musical group Crow Women, is currently in the midst of a two-year stint with the Peace Corps in Peru. She’s been keeping a wonderful blog of insights and experiences that I think many of you might enjoy. I think her post about celebrating the Winter Solstice is particularly good.
  • Aidan Kelly has written a remembrance of Allan Lowe / Demian Moonbloode, a NROOGD Elder who played a key role in the formation of the Covenant of the Goddess. Quote: “He was very involved in the creation of the Covenant of the Goddess, designing the original masthead for the COG newsletter and serving as a local and national officer during its first years. He went on to found Silver Star [...] one of our more radical and liberal covens, and it became the ancestor of about 90 percent of the NROOGD covens that have existed since then.” What is remembered, lives.

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Greetings everyone! I feel I’ve been away a long time because I was at PantheaCon in San Jose two weekends ago, and then working at FaerieCon West in Seattle this past weekend. I’ve been in my house only a full two days in between events, and it has left me feeling like I truly was disconnected from the “real” world, so it’s been something like an otherworldly sojourn. But now I’m back, I’m catching up, and returning to my daily routine. I’d like to thank my staff and columnists at The Wild Hunt for filling in while I’ve been away, and tomorrow I expect to be back to (relatively) normal and bringing you relevant (Pagan) news.

For now, I’d like to share a few images from my FaerieCon West adventure, and present a panel I moderated that featured T. Thorn Coyle, Raven Grimassi, and Stephanie Taylor-Grimassi.

Me interviewing acclaimed mythic fiction author Charles de Lint. Stay tuned for the audio of that conversation. Photo: T. Thorn Coyle.

Me interviewing acclaimed mythic fiction author Charles de Lint. Stay tuned for the audio of that conversation. Photo: T. Thorn Coyle.

German "paganfolk" band Faun playing at FaerieCon's Bad Faerie's Ball this past Saturday night.

German “paganfolk” band Faun playing at FaerieCon’s Bad Faerie’s Ball this past Saturday night.

Robert Gould interviews a panel of mythic artists: Stephanie Pui-Mun Law, Stephanie Lostimolo, Renae Taylor, and Maxine Miller.

Robert Gould interviews a panel of mythic artists: Stephanie Pui-Mun Law, Stephanie Lostimolo, Renae Taylor, and Maxine Miller.

Finally, here’s audio from a panel I moderated that discusses how you take the magic of these events home with you. Appropriate, I think, considering my current state.

Me, Stephanie Taylor-Grimassi, Raven Grimassi, and T. Thorn Coyle being very thoughtful.

Me, Stephanie Taylor-Grimassi, Raven Grimassi, and T. Thorn Coyle being very thoughtful.

“In this panel of spiritual luminaries: T. Thorn Coyle, Raven Grimassi, Stephanie Taylor-Grimassi, and moderator Jason Pitzl-Waters of The Wild Hunt, we discuss how to integrate the otherworldly and mythic into your day to day life. How do you take the magic of FaerieCon, or your favorite festival, home?”

So, it’s good to be back. If you are returning from your own otherworldly events I wish you an easy transition, fond memories, and positive transformations.

It’s hard to not acknowledge the fact that the word “witchcraft” still evokes feelings of apprehension, or even fear, from those who hear it. It’s a word that is almost primal, bringing up associations with magic, and the fantastical dark purposes some imagine when hearing that a “witch” might be near. The same reason some feel misgivings, however, is the reason many of us have reclaimed the term. Using that power to recast the folkloric evil crone into a wise woman, a healer, a representative of religions thought destroyed by the rise of Christianity. Since the emergence of Gerald Gardner in the 1950s, practitioners of modern Witchcraft have been hugely successful in changing associations, changing minds, about what a Witch could be, but that childhood figure of fear still lurks with some. Even in modern day Salem, New Hampshire, there are still some who whisper about the dangers of accepting the Witch.

tow new home

The Temple of Witchcraft’s new Salem home.

“Some may have thought it was a Halloween joke last week when they were invited to the Temple of Witchcraft for an open house. It was no joke. The Salem-based nonprofit organization is seeking Planning Board approval to relocate from its current home at 2 Main St. to a two-story, 19th-century home at 49 N. Policy St. [...] Selectman Everett McBride Jr. said he’s received a few emails from people who are worried about having the Temple of Witchcraft in their neighborhood. He has asked Town Manager Keith Hickey to look into the proposal. “The neighbors are nervous,” McBride said.”

The “neighbors are nervous,” but about what? Are they picturing Rosemary’s Baby, The Wizard of Oz, or are they simply worried that Wiccans will drive the property values down? Whatever the reason, the temple was quick to reassure the unnamed nervous neighbors that there was nothing to fear.

“To help dispell the misconceptions, the temple held an open house at the proposed site on Halloween, distributing fliers to neighbors to give them a chance to learn about the organization and its teachings. Only five people showed up. Some asked if they were handing out Halloween candy, which they did, Kenson said.”

The Temple of Witchcraft, which was co-founded by author Christopher Penczak, probably won’t have any major obstacles in getting their new temple space approved, it’s clear they have the law on their side, and that they’re not afraid of scrutiny from the public. They present a new sort of tension for those who hear the word Witch, the affirmation that we live in a country where even the faiths you might be afraid of have rights. It also presents a challenge for those who’ve reveled in the power of the word, of its ability to shock and unbalance. For if the Witches have a temple down the street, hold open houses, and hand out candy at Halloween, how scary or powerful could they really be? Indeed, whenever the word Witchcraft comes up, chances are good that Wicca will also be invoked. An uneasy co-existence ensues where fantasies like True Blood try to have their folkloric “bad” Witch and their “good” Wiccan-Witch healer at the same time. It doesn’t always work.

Hundreds of thousands of us have chosen to be Witches, to wear the title with pride in hopes of creating a new paradigm of power around it. The Temple of Witchcraft show that this effort has been wildly successful. We are no longer merely subcultural, but a part of the daytime world. We buy property, we have temples, we do PR, we’d like to build a parking lot for our guests. Still, the folkloric witch remains, so there will always be a liminal uneasiness that comes with our name (even in Salem). Perhaps this isn’t such a bad thing, perhaps that uneasiness reminds us that we are part of something far larger and wilder than we could hope to wholly control. We are modern, respectable, Witches, but perhaps those Halloween crones hold lessons for us still.

On a somewhat related note – this weekend I’m off to FaerieCon East in Baltimore, Maryland, where the Temple of Witchcraft’s own Christopher Penczak will be in attendance giving talks and participating in panels. If you’re in the neighborhood, please drop by and say hi! I’m hoping that maybe I can do a nice interview with Christopher for The Wild Hunt while I’m there.

2012 faeriecon east postcard front 202x3001

As for The Wild Hunt this weekend, not to worry! The rest of our wonderful staff will make sure things keep running while I’m away playing with the faeries, and I may even pop in with an update.

I’m in Seattle, Washington this weekend, part of the team that’s putting on FaerieCon West, a transformational celebration of music, myth, fantasy, and, of course, faerie. While FaerieCon West, and events like it, are not explicitly Pagan, the openness and embrace of Pagan culture can’t be missed by anyone whose eyes are open to it.

While there are many presentations and performances I’m looking forward to, I’m perhaps most excited about participating in a panel discussion with Jeet Kei Leung, who’s writing a book entitled “Dancing Together into The Great Shift: Transformational Festivals & The New Evolutionary Culture”, and once again getting to interview famed urban fantasy author Charles de Lint, best known for his “Newford” novels. I hope to bring you photos, interviews, and coverage from what I’m hoping will be amazing weekend. If you’re in the Seattle area, I hope you’ll drop by, experience it for yourself, and say hello!

In the meantime, before I head off, here’s a few quick Pagan news notes that I thought you should know about.

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!