New Pagan Health Survey Launched

Back in 2010 cultural anthropologist Kimberly Kirner, PhD (formerly Hedrick), launched a Pagan health survey to, quote, “help policy-makers and service providers understand our needs and beliefs.” The data collected from that survey was presented at the annual meeting of The American Public Health Association (APHA) in November of that year. Now, Dr. Kirner is launching a follow-up survey to explore some of her initial findings in greater depth. “Why should you take the Pagan Health Survey II? I am Pagan Druid and a cultural anthropologist at California State University, Northridge. I started the Pagan Health Survey in 2010, which provided a snapshot into the Pagan community, including our beliefs about healing and wellness and the choices we make in navigating the health care community. From the first survey, we learned that our community shares some strong common models about healing and wellness and that we have particular challenges in obtaining optimal health care.

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Update: Pagan Health Survey

Back in mid-August I alerted you to a new survey concerning Pagan health being conducted by Kimberly Hedrick of the TriWinds Institute; the results of which is to be presented at the annual meeting of The American Public Health Association (APHA) in November. “As both a Pagan and cultural anthropologist, I felt it was vitally important that we help policy-makers and service providers understand our needs and beliefs. This will help us to meet the health care needs of our community and build public understanding of our religious and spiritual traditions. I designed the Pagan Health Survey to help people better understand us and our views on health. The results will be combined with what I have gained by being within the Pagan community and sitting in on healing panel discussions, workshops, and so forth, as well as interviews with Pagan clergy and health care practitioners. This research is being funded through my grassroots nonprofit, TriWinds Institute through donations.”
While Hedrick tells me that response to the survey so far has been good, allowing them to reach a confidence level of 95% with a confidence interval of +/- 4%, they’d like to hear from 400-500 more individuals to make their data even more accurate.