There’s No Sacred Land in Arizona

It is becoming increasingly clear that government officials and politicians don’t believe any piece of land in Arizona is sacred. At least if that land is considered sacred by Native Americans. First, a coalition of Native tribes and environmental activists lost a long legal battle over the controversial expansion of the Snowbowl ski resort on the San Francisco Peaks (though some are pressing on), a move that involves creating snow from treated wastewater, what they see as a desecration that would be “like putting death on the mountain.” Now, U.S. Department of the Interior office of hearings and appeals have rejected the latest appeal to a proposed shooting range in the Mohave Valley, despite challenges from the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe and the Hualapai Tribal Nation. “After 13 years, the attempt to secure a shooting range in Mohave Valley is drawing closer to reality. The U.S. Department of the Interior office of hearings and appeals rejected the latest appeal from two Tri-state Indian tribes. The federal Bureau of Land Management will transfer a 787-acre parcel to the Arizona Game & Fish Department, which has set aside approximately $2 million for construction.

U.S. DoA Approves Ski Resort Expansion on Sacred Mountain

Despite a long legal battle that went all the way to the US Supreme Court, and despite secret talks held between the Department of Agriculture and Flagstaff city officials to find a last-minute compromise, it looks like the controversial expansion of the Snowbowl ski resort on the San Francisco Peaks in Arizona has been approved and is going forward. “Well, it finally happened. Despite objections from a number of tribes throughout the Southwest, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently approved Arizona Snowbowl to continue with their expansion efforts, which will undoubtedly include artificial snowmaking. It’s no surprise that Snowbowl owner Eric Borowski was thrilled, adding that he would make a request to the Flagstaff City Council to use potable water to make artificial snow since tribes had previously complained about the use of reclaimed sewage effluent to make artificial snow. But if left with no choice, he was prepared to use reclaimed wastewater.” As I’ve reported here on this blog before, a coalition of 13 Native American Tribal Nations who consider the land sacred ground have been fighting to stop what they see as a desecration that would be “like putting death on the mountain”.

Starhawk and the RNC Police Raids

As St. Paul, Minnesota, gears up to host the Republican National Convention, local law enforcement agencies are engaging in a series of draconian crack-downs on local activist centers and homes (including the local homeless-feeding Food Not Bombs chapter) in hopes of intimidating groups planning to protest the convention. Pagan author and activist Starhawk, who is there with the Pagan Cluster to protest, files this report on the raids.”One by one, protesters trickle out. Now we get more pieces of the story. The cops burst in, with no warning.

Ready To Spread Those “Secret Pagan” Rumors?

Tired of the “Obama is a secret Muslim” rumors? Starhawk has (jokingly) proposed that we fight fire with fire and start claiming that McCain is a secret Pagan.Senator McCain? Is that you under there?”You don’t have to be a Pagan to win my vote–in fact, I’d advise you not to be a Pagan if you want to win an election. Hmmn, perhaps we don’t make enough use of unpopular religions. Since there’s a widespread internet lie that Obama is really a Muslim, perhaps we should counter with the rumor that McCain was seen dancing naked in the moonlight, wearing goats’ horns.

A Christian Nation, A Christian President

Republican Presidential hopeful John McCain caused controversy this week by stating his belief that America was founded on “Christian” principles, and that he would hesitate to elect a non-Christian to office. “I just have to say in all candor that since this nation was founded primarily on Christian principles…. personally, I prefer someone who I know who has a solid grounding in my faith … I would probably have to say yes, that the Constitution established the United States of America as a Christian nation. But I say that in the broadest sense.