Pagan musicians share glimpses of their daily lives in Project Unity

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NOVA SCOTIA, Canada – From the Canadian Maritimes, Project Unity traveled out into the atmosphere, through wavelengths and into people’s homes. Pagan musicians from around the globe shared clips as a glimpse into their daily lives during the pandemic, adding to the streaming messages of hope that have been circulated worldwide.

William Brigley works in tandem with Chuck Chapman. They began to produce podcasts on various Pagan topics, as well as conducting interviews. During the podcasts, melodies from Pagan artists floated through the program’s intermissions. 

The two conjured up International Pagan Radio in 2011. Their vision circling around the support of Pagan musicians, operating to bring attention to the talented acts while also generating royalties. 

A seedling idea planted in Brigley’s media-manager mind grew into a side project. With the conception of “Project Unity,” Brigley embarked on a campaign to reach out to Pagan performers not only in North American but abroad as well.  

Fifteen artists sent over clips which set the project’s run time at a touch under 42 minutes. The participants utilized their time by giving an overview of what their days are like spent social distancing. There was also a resounding universal declaration of encouragement inserted into their recordings. 

The brainchild of this initiative opens the video communication. Brigley states, “I wanted everyone to know that they are not alone in this. So I thought what better way to share our thoughts and stories and our situations that we are facing. So to do this, I’ve been joined by a few people that have spent most of their lives bringing joys to the communities. So let’s take a listen.”

Station manager Chuck Chapman touches on what he is doing at this time. “Sacred Solitude. Meditation. Introspection. Study ritual. Communication with that innermost divine self. Making sure those lines of communication are open and clear.” 

Bouncing over to one of the countries hit hardest by the pandemic, Marco Strega from Materdea relays his heartfelt words from Turin, Italy. Strega conveys his message of love for our planet and working together to overcome this moment. 

Simon Papa, who is also in Materdea, reflects on the seriousness of the situation in their home country and the uncertainty of when it will be over. The singer also discusses her point of view regarding taking this opportunity to strengthen our bonds with our planet. 

Back at the “House of Sage” in Ohio, Susan Balaschak records in front of the Burning Sage‘s drum kit nestled in the basement where the band records and rehearses. Recapping the group’s daily activities, there is also mention of the group working on a new album. 

Traveling south from Ohio, Barefoot Bran checks in from Kansas. Gaining a month off from the day job, Bran echos the majority of artists–during this passing time, working on creating new music is part of the agenda. 

Additions to her youtube channel, collaborations over distances and home cooking is what Ginger Ackley is up to back in Ohio. She also suggests that if anyone is interested in swapping recipes, she would love to converse about new food ideas. 

Damh the Bard tunes in from his studio in the United Kingdom and shares his passion for Spring. Painting a beautiful picture of plants and animals that are part of his world. The Bard regales the viewers with an account of an upcoming album. The third branch of the Y Mabinogi is in full bloom as his wife Carrie contributes her artwork to the newest release. 

Floating back to New Jersey, Cloud is thankful. The Pagan rapper/IPR Youtube Host and wife had lost their jobs. Still upbeat, he reports that no one in his house is sick. 

The members of Hekate’s Torch, Robert Johnson and Femi Heqet, have been focusing on sending out healing vibes to the world from British Columbia. Along with a cameo from their black cat, Ebony, the pair have been active participants in their community outreach. With a promise of a current showcase of songs and music videos, the duo signs off with a virtual hug to the observer.  

David Wood checks in from his Ohio home to let the folks at home know that he is not going anywhere. With the luxury of working and making music from home, the artist is staying in place and urges others to stay safe. 

In Adelaide, Australia autumn is setting in. Adrienne Piggott of Spiral Dance speaks about how she feels living during this time. “I feel like I’m in a bit of a strange science fiction movie right now with you all and it’s all very surreal with what’s been happening.” 

Up on Cadborough Hill in the UK, Mark Knight shows us a part of his world in Derbyshire, England. Green Fortune’s singer/songwriter chose to share a green backdrop as it was the inspiration for the melody that was written not too long ago.  

Heading northwest from Derbyshire, George Nicholas from Cernunnos Rising checks in from his fireside, expressing his sadness with the health crisis and the effects thereof. Remaining busy he says he continues to write poetry, make art and music to pass the time in Liverpool, England. 

At her London home, Livia Pye touches on how she has been coping during her time in quarantine. She gives a personal look at her “creative space” that she has set up where she can feel grounded and secure.  

Matt Lyons of Dancing Hare, who also resides in England, takes his time on video to emphasize the importance of creating music, remaining hopeful, and admiring the beauty that is the changing of the season. 

Back in Ohio and taking a minute to focus on the small children during this time, Ackley’s character “Poise The Flower Pixie” makes an appearance. With kind and gentle words, the happy go lucky pixie explains the importance of handwashing and staying safe. 

The artists note that technology has been a key element to stay in touch with their fans but it is not the same as being with them in person. They are all very much looking forward to performing in front of a live audience when it is safe to do so again. 

Editorial Note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly listed William Brigley as William Bringley. We have corrected this and apologize for the error.