Archives For New Alexandrian Library Project

Before beginning I’d like to express my enthusiasm for the future of The Wild Hunt. Writing for and about this extended community has been both challenging and invigorating. One of the perks of the job is in the education. Every time I write an article or retell someone’s story, I learn something new. That’s the gift that I receive in return for my time and effort. In addition, I am ever thankful to Jason for instilling his trust in me to help usher in a new decade for this amazing resource.

That brings me to the subject for the day: resources or, more specifically, archival resources. Over the past 10 years Jason has been cataloging Pagan news. The Wild Hunt has become an historical archive containing data on many past events. Each post is a point in time providing a snapshot of what’s going on – the good and the bad; the progressive and the not so progressive and the downright ugly. It catalogs our successes and our failings as well as capturing the whimsy in celebration and expansion.

Photo Credit: Flickr's timetrax23

Photo Credit: Flickr’s timetrax23

Archival research has always been essential to much of my work and that remains true to this day. As I child I was told to never make a statement without 3 supporting facts. My teacher would often say, “Prove it.” I took her advice to heart and will do an excruciating amount of digging before making any type of claim. Now I find something very exhilarating in the finding of the “tiny needle in a haystack” after hours digging through archival material.

However the preservation of historical data serves more than just research junkies like me. There is a higher purpose. The founders of The Adocentyn Research Library explain, “We are living in a period of growth, diversity and change akin to the first few hundred years of Christianity. Future scholars shouldn’t have to rely on the discovery of a future Nag Hammadi library in order to understand our diversity and our history.” This is a project whose time has come.

Here’s an example from my favorite subject: film history. At the turn of the 20th century, movies were considered lowbrow entertainment or sideshow novelties. Nobody thought much more about the filmed product. Technical innovators focused on production while producers focused on the building of a commercial venture. Nobody stopped to catalog or archive the footage being shown. Nobody considered or knew how highly flammable the early celluloid material would be. The American film Industry focused on the doing and not the archiving. Consequently most early films are lost in whole or in part. The historical data contained in those early film reels and in the production processes are completely gone. That’s nearly 40 years of lost material.

Photo Credit: Flickr's Sonear

Photo Credit: Flickr’s Sonear

The Pagan Movement, as it’s been called, is now well beyond the stories of Gerald Gardener, Aleister Crowley, Dion Fortune and the like.  Up to this point the focus has been more on the doing and not the archiving. No doubt much has already been lost. Regardless we still have many long trails of breadcrumbs through our cultural forest that can be captured. Sabina Magliocco, one of the founders of the Pagan History Project says:

It’s clear that we’re now one of the fastest-growing new religious movements in the world. The documentation of our early history is thus doubly important, especially as the movement is changing in important ways. The elders who were involved in the movement’s early days are now in the twilight of their lives; we have already lost a number just in the last year. Recording their histories and archiving documents from the beginning of the diffusion of modern Paganisms in the US will help preserve that history for future historians.

Just in the past two weeks, Judy Harrow’s crossing came as a surprise to many. Director Holli S. Emore says, “At Cherry Hill Seminary we are all too painfully aware of how the loss of someone like Judy Harrow inserts a sort of glottal stop in the narration of how we came to be where we are today. Anything we did not learn from Judy before last Friday is now gone forever.”

There are lessons to be learned from past experience at all levels of practice. What worked and what didn’t? Why did this group fold and this one last for 30 years?  Shauna Aura Knight is an author and presenter whose focus is on Pagan leadership skills. She says:

When I travel and teach Pagan leadership, what I see over and over is reinventing the wheel … I’ve seen local Pagan unity-type organizations–with actual not-for-profit status–folding because the leaders couldn’t sustain the organizations any longer. Thus those resources become lost, and any future group has to start again. 

Fortunately a number of projects have formed or are forming to fill this very need. Located in California’s Bay Area, The Adocentyn Research Library aims to preserve an expansive amount of material from a variety of religious communities “including indigenous, tribal, polytheistic, nature-based, and/or Earth-centered religions, spiritualities and cultures around the world and throughout human history.” They currently have cataloged more than 6,000 books and are working with the “Lost and Endangered Religions Project on conservation and storage of Pagan materials from India, Turkey and Guatemala.”

Similarly, in southern Delaware, the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel is raising money to finish the construction of the New Alexandrian Research Library (NAL). The “Library will be collecting materials from all religious traditions focusing on their mystical and the spiritual writings.” Founders hope that NAL will serve as both a functional community and research center as well as become a “cornerstone for the new magical Renaissance.”

Photo Credit:  Circle Sanctuary, Circle Magazine

Photo Credit: Circle Sanctuary, Circle Magazine

All archiving doesn’t need to be done by librarians and institutions. Several groups have digitized their own newsletters such as the Georgian Wicca Tradition and the Covenant of the Goddess. Back Issues of old print periodicals are available for purchase such as Circle Magazine whose offers issues dating back to 1980 when it was still called “Circle Network News.” The Founders of Adocentyn say “Archiving our history ourselves is important because we take our movement seriously, know how parts relate to one another, and understand it.”

Another recent development is the effort to capture individual stories. Shauna Aura Knight is co-editing a new anthology for Immanion Press has that very aim. She says, “I hope to start collecting the stories of what works and how leaders can use that, but also, what hasn’t worked. What are the mistakes we want to avoid in the future?”

The Pagan History Project has a similar objective. Sabina Magliocco explains:

The Pagan History Project is modeled after other oral history projects such as the American Folklife Center’s Veterans’ History Project. We rely on community members to record oral histories from other community members. These digital documents will be posted on a website and made available to other community members and scholars. … At this point, we are focusing on interviewing elders in our community who were involved with the inception of Paganisms in the US.

The Project seeks to create a “mythic history” that captures our humanity through the recording of voices. Currently organizers are looking for volunteers to go out into their communities and interview anyone willing. In this way future generations can benefit from the experiences of even those who have chosen to lead a quiet, non-public life. Holli S. Emore says,”For the many mystics among us, and most certainly for reconstructionists, an understanding of our historical roots has proven to be a vital part of our spiritual journey …  We are deeply enriched by learning the many layers and traces of Pagan history.”

The preservation of the past serves to not only enrich our present experience but to help build a stronger future. Together all these records will tell the greater story of a Movement or Movements with all the nuance and color one might expect. And, if nothing else, these archives will help future historians, research junkies and Wild Hunt journalists look back and say, “So that’s how it all came to be…”      

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Circle Magazine

Circle Magazine

The latest issue of Circle Magazine (#115) is now at the printers, and available for order at the Circle Sanctuary store. Quote: “This issue features inspiration to honor our families, from birth, through childhood to departed ancestors. Also in this issue, connect with the season with rituals, crafts and songs for the Solstice, Yule and the New Year!” Lady Liberty League, Circle Sanctuary’s religious freedom advocacy arm, also notes that there are many items in this issue of interest to their mission. Quote: “Lots for Lady Liberty League fans in the new issue of Circle Magazine, shipping to subscribers and online now! Get the final report on all the collaborative work LLL did to address religious violence on Facebook & read the LLL End-of-Year Statement from LLL Case Manager, Minerva Thalia. ALSO look for ‘Advocating for Pagan Children in the Public School System’ by public school teacher Aurora Lightbringer, and read her ’6 Key Strategies to Address Religious Discrimination in Schools.’ You won’t want to miss this on!” So check it out!

cropped-PconBanner13aHey there PantheaCon watchers! The largest indoor Pagan conference in the United States has just released its 2014 programming schedule, featuring a dizzying array of talks, panels, and workshops. Quote: “The PantheaCon 2014 schedule is now available, and we are again offering you two ways to view it!  First, you can click here to see the list of presenters and events by room.  If you would like to see presenter biographies and event descriptions, you can click here to access our improved Personal Schedule tool – it also allows you to to customize your schedule by selecting only those events that you want to attend. You will need a valid email address to use this tool.  Email programming(at)pantheacon.com if you experience any issues.” Some early highlights: the band Woodland playing at PantheaCon for the first time ever, a formal panel on privilege within modern Paganism moderated by T. Thorn Coyle, a panel discussion on sacrifice hosted by Coru Cathubodua, Lupercalia with Ekklesia Antinoou, and much, much, much, more! So check it out, and keep in mind that this schedule could change depending on additions or changes in attendance. Also, schedules for hospitality suites aren’t posted yet, so that’s another aspect to keep an eye out for.

1425710_10201953836920156_1475050013_nWitches of Michigan and the Michigan-Midwest Witches Ball have issued a statement saying they would being taking over the Tempest Smith Foundation’s scholarship program, after it was publicly announced that the advocacy organization would be closing down. Quote: “As everyone may/or may not know, Tempest Smith Foundation is closing their doors very soon. We (Witches of Michigan and Witches Ball) have joined forces to continue with TSF’s scholarship program. Met with the lawyer yesterday, to form a Non Profit and apply for 501c3 by the end of the year this will have been accomplished. I like to thank those who donated money to the cause, we raised enough for the 501c3, and generous donations from WOM and MWB paid for creation of the Non-profit. Starting on 1/1/14 we will accepting applications for pagan high school seniors for $500 scholarship.” The new scholarship will be called the Michigan Pagan Scholarship, and the nascent organization has started a group on Facebook. The Tempest Smith Foundation has been “a voice for diversity tolerance in its Michigan community and an advocate of anti-bullying campaigns,” and it looks like Michigan Pagans are going to make sure its legacy lives on.  We will report more on this story as it develops.

In Other Pagan Community News:

Adela Leibowitz "Isis and the goat-fish of Ea (Enki)" 2012

Adela Leibowitz “Isis and the goat-fish of Ea (Enki)” 2012

  • Esoteric artist Adela Leibowitz has opened a new show this month at hpgrp Gallery in New York, with pieces focusing on Mesopotamian and Egyptian Mythology. Quote: “Unlike earlier series such as Fairytales of the Macabre (2004) and The Cassandra Prophesies, (2006), which focused on Western tales, Leibowitz turns to Eastern religions and mythologies in “Mesopotamian and Egyptian Mythology.” In this exhibition, she continues her explorations by re-animating gods and goddesses, chaos demons, sages, protective deities and mythical hybrids. She places them in lush, tropical landscapes that represent a primal world where humans, animals and nature co-exist together in harmony. In essence, she creates utopias.” Also, check out the Phantasmaphile write-up. The show runs through December 21st.
  • Just a reminder that the New Alexandrian Library’s short crowd-funding initiative to continue the ongoing construction on their future physical space in Delaware has less than a week to go. So if libraries run by Pagan and esoteric interests is something you value, be sure to visit their IndieGoGo page and add your support. For all of my coverage of the New Alexandrian Library, click here.
  • In other crowd-funding news, as I mentioned on Monday, Starhawk has launched an IndieGoGo campaign to fund diversity scholarships for Earth Activist Trainings. Quote: “A small investment in Earth Activist Training has a huge ripple effect. Any amount you can donate will help diversify the environmental justice movement, bring new perspectives and insights into the permaculture movement, and give activists and community leaders the tools they need to build that beautiful world of the future we know is possible!”
  • Treadwell’s in London is hosting a one-person play about artist and occultist Austin Osman Spare on November 30th. Quote: “Set in the artist’s studio at the Elephant and Castle on the night  of a Blitz bombing, it shows Spare growing old in poverty, yet fiercely committed to his vision. In the course of the night, a rogue sigil unleashes unpredictable consequences. This ‘play conceived as an act of magic’, performed by the author, is both an homage to AOS and a playful exploration of Constable’s own esoteric work to ‘set us free from ourselves.’ John Constable is a poet, playwright and magical practitioner best-known for The Southwark Mysteries, and for his acclaimed stage adaptation of Gormenghast.”
  • I’m always a big fan of crowd-funded tarot and oracle decks, and the Kickstarter for the Tarot of Delphi looks rather nice. Quote: “Curated with fine art from the late 1830s to the early 1910s, the Tarot of Delphi is like a mini-museum. You can wander through this captivating deck – exploring the imagery, absorbing the colors and light, envisioning the lives depicted – and imagine yourself within its mythic narrative.”

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

The New Alexandrian Library Rises

The New Alexandrian Library

The New Alexandrian Library, a project of the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel which hopes to create an institution that will become “one of the cornerstones of a new magickal renaissance,” has launched a new short crowd-funding initiative to continue the ongoing construction on the future physical space in Delaware. Quote: “The exterior of the building is almost done and interior work is proceeding. lf we can keep things going at the pace we are moving we could potentially use the early Spring months of 2014 to actually start setting up the shelves and moving in. We need a total of an additional $60,000 in the next 6 months, But right now, we are asking for immediate funds of $15,000 for the next push forwards.“ I think a video from 2012, at the groundbreaking of the library, does a good job of explaining the importance of building infrastructure projects like the NAL. So if libraries run by Pagan and esoteric interests is something you value, be sure to visit their IndieGoGo page and add your support. In the words of the campaign: “The NAL will be one of the cornerstones (of many created by various groups across the globe we hope!) of a new magickal renaissance. The benefits of this growing network for future generations will be incalculable.” For all of my coverage of the New Alexandrian Library, click here.

camplalanadaPNC-Florida has coverage of the recently held Florida Pagan Gathering Samhain 2013, which featured special guests Amber K, Azrael Arynn K, Ivo Dominguez, Jr., Stephanie Woodfield, Rev. Kirk S. Thomas, Grey Ghosthawk and Gypsey Teague. Quote: Florida Pagan Gathering Samhain 2013 was held November 6th through  November 10th at its beautiful new home at Camp La Llanada in Lake Wales, Florida. The organizers of FPG, Temple of Earth Gathering Inc., had chosen this location to host Beltaine 2014 but quickly pushed forward with the move due to the government shutdown’s effect on the former location at Ocala National Forest. Guests and staff of the event were so pleased and grateful for the hard work of the board of directors of Temple of Earth Gathering for making the transition so swift and smooth. One long time guest of The Gathering, the venerable Lady Solar Bear, remarked on how good it felt to be in a place where children came to learn about their heritage.” While I’m on the subject of PNC-Florida, check out their recent stories, which includes an update on Pagan clergy attending an interfaith child hunger summit.

372854_57526231713_1400552470_nTwo Llewellyn Worldwide titles have won awards, and two more were finalists, in the 2013 USA Best Book Awards, a contest sponsored by USABookNews.com. Quote: “The 2013 results represent a phenomenal mix of books from a wide array of publishers throughout the United States. With a full publicity and marketing campaign promoting the results of the USA Best Book Awards, this year’s winners and finalists will gain additional media coverage for the upcoming holiday retail season.” The winners were Discovering the Medium Within, by Anysia Kiel (in the New Age: Non-Fiction category), and Great Sex Made Simple, by Mark A. Michaels & Patricia Johnson (in the Self-Help: Relationships category). The finalists were The Magick of Flowers, by Tess Whitehurst (in the New Age: Non-Fiction category) and Living a Life of Gratitude, by Sara Wiseman (in the Self-Help: Motivational category). Congratulations to Llewellyn and the authors!

In Other Pagan Community News:

Patrick McCollum in India

Patrick McCollum in India

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

20130908_165455Adocentyn Research Library, a Pagan library located in the San Francisco Bay area, has reached a new milestone. According to Adocentyn board member and co-founder Donald H. Frew, the institution has now catalogued over 5000 books. Quote: “At the end of last weekend’s cataloguing day, we broke the 5000 mark and reached 5150 books in our online catalogue! You can see them, here. The most recent additions are shown at the top. (Make sure the drop down tab at the upper left shows “All collections”.) There are over 6000 volumes currently on-site (plus hundreds of periodicals) with another 5000+ coming (plus ephemera such as correspondence, notebooks, etc.). Cataloguing takes time, but we have 19 volunteers helping us move things along.” You can keep up with the latest announcements at their official Facebook page. Adocentyn has had preliminary talks with the New Alexandrian Library Project (currently under construction) and other institutions in forming a Pagan Libraries Organization so that they can share information, and offer inter-library loans.

Plans for the New Alexandrian Library

Plans for the New Alexandrian Library

Speaking of the New Alexandrian Library, work and fundraising on the project is ongoing. A project of the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel, the library hopes to become “one of the cornerstones of a new magickal renaissance.” If that is something you’d like to be a part of, September might be an excellent month to donate. The Louis Claude de St. Martin Fund of the Luzerne Foundation has offered a $500 matching challenge grant to the library. Assembly of the Sacred Wheel member Leanne Pemburn asks supporters to “consider a $10 donation, that will become $20, or a $50 donation that will become $100″ and that “now’s the time to magickally grow your donation!” You can find donation information, here. In other New Alexandrian Library news, if you go to their official Facebook page, you can see some of the books in their collection awaiting opening day. As their websites says, “you can play an important part in bringing this dream into reality. The immediate need is for the funds to build the library, although donations of books and other materials will be welcome. The New Alexandrian Library will be located in the sacred woods of Seelie Court in Southern Delaware and will be under the aegis of the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel, a 501(c)3 organization. All donations to the NAL are tax deductable.” You can see all previous reporting on this project, here.

Lilith Dorsey

Lilith Dorsey

The Patheos Pagan channel has launched a new blog entitled “Voodoo Universe” featuring the writings of Lilith Dorsey, author of “Voodoo and Afro-Caribbean Paganism,” and an initiate in Santeria, Vodoun, and New Orleans Voodoo. In her first blog post, Dorsey lays out her spiritual journey. Quote: “My personal spiritual journey includes numerous initiations in Haitian Vodou, New Orleans Voodoo, and Santeria. In 1995 I became editor and publisher of the Oshunnewsletter, providing accurate and respectful information about Afro-Diasporan Pagan religions. I hold an undergraduate degree in anthropology and my graduate degree comes from a inter-disciplinary program in cinema/television studies and anthropology. Training is vital in any discipline, but takes on special significance in a spiritual context. Voodoo, Vodou, Santeria, Candomble, Ifa, Obeah, Hoodoo, and for that matter any other African based religion survives on it’s lineage, history, and training of it’s devotees.” As Afro-diasporic and African Traditional Religions become more popular, and more Pagans become initiates into these traditions, good information and news from these communities will be increasingly vital. I look forward to reading Voodoo Universe.

In Other Pagan Community News:

Selena Fox (with Shauna Aura Knight) at Chicago Pagan Pride.

Selena Fox (with Shauna Aura Knight) at Chicago Pagan Pride.

In a final note, today is the 12th anniversary of the September 11th attacks. My prayers and thoughts go out to all who have suffered and died as a result of that day. I think Heather Greene’s recent thoughtful piece on visiting the 9/11 Memorial in New York is an appropriate mediation for this day. You may also want to read my pieces from 2012 and 2011. Blessings to you all.

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

The Maetreum of Cybele Launches Crowdfunding Initiative: The Maetreum of Cybele, Magna Mater, has been in an ongoing tax battle with the Town of Catskill, New York, a battle centered on whether their building should be afforded a property tax exemption. The most recent round of this fight, before the New York State Supreme Court, did not go well for the Maetreum, though they feel their case for appeal is strong. However, to file that appeal, they need money, money they simply don’t have after years of legal challenges. So, the Maetreum has now launched an IndieGoGo campaign to raise $5000 to continue their fight.

“We are now in the process of filing an appeal and this matter will need to go up to the higher levels of New York’s court system.  Unfortunately, we have been unable to find a pro bono attorney to take the case and many of the legal advocacy organizations that we contacted were unable to help, either, thus forcing us to foot the legal bills ourselves.  These have now exceeded $30,000 over the years (and, mind you, we have never even taken in $30,000 in a year!).  According to our best estimates, the Town of Catskill has spent easily six figures of taxpayer money on our case:  more than they could ever get from either taxes on the property or proceed from a foreclosure sale!  The Town Supervisor even went on the record and told a reporter for the local paper, the Daily Mail, that the town considers us to be an “illegitimate religion”.  They have not done this to any other local religious group or church.”

In an exchange with Rev. Mother Cathryn Platine of the Maetreum, she stressed that time and resources were running out, quote, “our attorney wants the entire fee by the filing date which is Feb 4. We have an excellent chance of winning and have raised half the needed fees ourselves but the winter expenses along with the balance is making it difficult. Viktoria and I are selling off our antiques acquired over a lifetime to raise additional money.” So, if this is a case you care about, if you’d like to see the Maetreum continue its work, or are worried about the precedents established if they cannot continue to fight this case, spread the word and donate to their campaign. The Wild Hunt will be keeping track of the Maetreum’s tax battle as things progress.

ADF Marks the Passing of Former Preceptor Rev. George Lee:  Druid organization Ar nDraiocht Fein (ADF) announced on their official Facebook page yesterday that Rev. George Lee (aka Raven Mann) a liturgist, ritual leader, and former preceptor within the ADF, had passed away at the age of 49.

Rev. George Lee (Raven Mann)

Rev. George Lee (Raven Mann)

“Raven Mann was an effective priest and ritual leader, and also an accomplished liturgist. He served as the ADF Preceptor during the latter half of Rev. Skip Ellison’s term as Archdruid and made many contributions to the deliberations of the ADF Clergy Council. His passing will be a great loss to ADF.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to his wife, Rev. Kelly Kingston (Carrion Mann) and their daughter Morrighan at this sad time. We also pray that he may pass quickly to the Otherworlds in the company of his Ancestors.”

For any that wish to make donations to Reverend Raven Mann’s family to help with funeral costs and things, 6th Night Grove, ADF has started a Raven Mann Memorial Fund. We here at The Wild Hunt offer our sincerest condolences, may Raven Mann rest with his gods and return to us again.

A History of New York Paganism: The New York Pagan podcast has posted audio of the first of four Pagan Way 40th Anniversary Lectures that took place in November. Presented by the New York Pagan Alliance, the First Unitarian Congregational Society of Brooklyn, New York, and the New York pagan community, the first lecture features Margot Adler, author of “Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshippers, and Other Pagans in America,” and Michael Lloyd, author of “Bull of Heaven: The Mythic Life of Eddie Buczynski and the Rise of the New York Pagan.”

Margot Adler, Michael Lloyd, at Anniversary Pagan Way Lecture Series; photo by Brian Brewer

Margot Adler, Michael Lloyd, at Anniversary Pagan Way Lecture Series; photo by Brian Brewer

“New York Pagan History: How We Got to Where We Are Today, the first in the series, featured author Michael Lloyd, whose painstaking efforts to chronicle the historic and cultural forces that influenced the establishment, rise, fall, and rebirth of the New York Pagan community have produced a treasure trove of well-documented insights into the earliest beginnings of the Pagan movement. [...] Margot, who provides the foreword to Bull of Heaven, shares in this talk how her earliest encounters with the Craft were deeply influenced by Eddie Buczynski and the emerging New York City Pagan community of the early 1970s.”

For more on this lecture series, see Zan Fraser’s write-up at The Juggler. To download the audio of the lecture, head over to the New York Pagan podcast site. I look forward to hearing the rest of this series, and I encourage my readers to subscribe to this podcast. For some more background on what The Pagan Way is, check out Aidan Kelly’s recent post on the subject.

In Other Community News:

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

No matter what your belief system a whole lot of people are kicking off their holiday shopping today (or really, really, early this morning). Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday, all initiatives to get people to spend their money early, to trigger that flood of commerce that many businesses, both small and large, depend on to survive. However, I believe this is also a great time to think about how the money you spend now could be used to help build important projects within the larger interconnected Pagan community. Perhaps a donation made in honor of a local elder, teacher, or friend who is active in building and supporting Pagan infrastructure.

A bright and ongoing success story in the Pagan community has been the utilization of crowd-funding sites like IndieGoGo and Kickstarter to collectively raise funds for important projects.Starhawk raised over $75,000 dollars to help fund a pitch-reel in order get a feature film based on her book “The Fifth Sacred Thing” made. Peter Dybing helped raise $30,000 dollars for Doctors Without Borders in the wake of the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami. Pagan singer-songwriter SJ Tucker was amazed when a Kickstarter campaign for Tricky Pixie’s European tour more than doubled their initial goal in a matter of hours (and kept on growing). In addition, several smaller initiatives have managed to collectively raise thousands for Pagan projects: The readers of The Wild Hunt funded the proposed budget of this site for a year, Chicago-based Pagan/magical performance troupe Terra Mysterium raised funds for their new show “The Alembic,”and the Goddess community funded a documentary film in honor of Merlin Stone.

Crowdfunding sites allow an easy mechanism for fundraising in communities that may have social networks and organizations, but not the robust money-raising infrastructure of already-established mainstream institutions. This is a place modern Paganism is in today, and more and more of us are turning to these sites as a solution to our “money problem.” There are hundreds of thousands of Pagans out there, millions around the world, and they desire to see our projects and initiatives advance just as much as any other faith community. On this “Black Friday” I’d like to bring two fundraising initiatives that I think are worthy of your support, and might just be the perfect gift for the community-minded Pagan on your list.

New Alexandrian Library Raises Funds to Finish Construction: At the end of 2011 the New Alexandrian Library, a project that hopes to create “a library worthy of its namesake” focused on esoteric knowledge, mystical and the spiritual writings from many traditions, officially broke ground on their physical space in Delaware.  Then, the foundations for that library were poured for the dome structure that will be erected. This past Fall a successful IndieGoGo fundraiser was launched to pay for the next stage of construction. Now, the New Alexandrian Library has launched the second phase of their fundraising campaign, $10,500 dollars to pay for the next stage of construction. In a guest post during the last round of fundraising, Michael Smith, an Elder in the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel, explained why this initiative is so important.

“The primary aims of the Library are: 1) to secure the resources to ensure the Library is wholly owned and administered by Pagans and contributes to the real-asset community infrastructure; 2) provide ongoing stewardship for our communities’ work and essence; and 3) make the collected materials as convenient as possible for the community to access. Ultimately, the Library will be a resource to support new academic study and research to further develop our community for centuries to come.”

Many of us talk about Pagan infrastructure, but the New Alexandrian Library Project is doing Pagan infrastructure; you can actually see the results of your donations as the first dome rises.

The New Alexandrian Library Rises

The New Alexandrian Library Rises

This campaign runs through December 8th, and so far only 7 funders have donated. I think we can collectively do much, much better, especially for a project that will benefit so many of us. Further, all donations are tax deductible, so why not give your taxes a little gift along with building needed Pagan infrastructure?

A Documentary to Awaken the Gods and Goddesses of Brazil: The next project I’d like to endorse is by Layne Redmond, author of “When the Drummers Were Women: A Spiritual History of Rhythm,” who is producing a documentary entitled “Axé Orixá: Dreaming Awake the Gods & Goddesses of Brazil.”

“Axé Orixá (pronounced ashay orishah) is a film of the dance, drumming and chants of the Orixás (Afro-Brazilian gods and goddesses) and how they manifest today through some of Bahia’s greatest musicians and legendary dancers. The film unfolds through dreamlike sequences of music and dance featuring seven of the Orixás delicately linked through the artists’ explanation of their spiritual realities, and how the rituals live on in Brazilian culture today. Axé Orixá enables modern Bahian artists to reimagine their traditions in a uniquely visionary form.”

The campaign has raised nearly $20,000 of its $30,500 goal, and has 23 days to go. A $35 dollar donation gets you (or someone you love) a copy of the completed documentary. In a recent letter to supporters, Redmond made it known that she’s been dealing with several rounds of breast cancer and its treatment, and that finishing this film has taken on a renewed sense of urgency because of this.

“Realizing the film meant something to people, I coudn’t wait to finish the project.  But then I found out I had breast cancer.  Everything came to a stand still as I went through the first surgery and recovery, and then it came back and I had the second surgery and then it came back again and I had to let go of the project.  The hardest thing about having a cancer diagnosis is that you lose your sense of a future, you give up your projects, and you don’t know how much longer you are going to live.  In reality we never know how long we are going to live and now that I’ve accepted that and prepared to die, a great weight has lifted from my mind.  And on top of it I haven’t died! :D 

In fact I feel great!  I started a weight training program in July, along with all my other health regimens and have just gotten stronger and stronger.   And then Daniel Sabio showed up, a young computational media student taking a gap year between undergrad and grad school who loved the music I recorded for Axé Orixá and has put his incredible talents and energy behind helping this come into manifestation.”

I think that more documentaries on the African diasporic religions are needed, and one focused on dance and choreography within Candomblé can only help shed more (positive) light on a faith that is still largely unknown by many in the United States. So head over to the campaign page, and check it out!

These are just two great examples of how you could use your money this holiday season to support Pagan infrastructure. In addition, you could also donate to organizations that are doing good work, but may not be running an active campaign right now. Initiatives like Cherry Hill Seminary, who’ve made great strides towards becoming an accredited Pagan learning institution, the Adocentyn Research Library, or Solar Cross Temple. There are a variety of choices before you, some local, some national, some international, but all could use greater support from us. So this holiday season, think about the gifts that could reverberate for generations to come but building our religious and spiritual infrastructure.

Over at Llewellyn Wordlwide’s official blogElysia Gallo, Senior Acquisitions Editor for Witchcraft, Wicca, Pagan, and magickal books, lists seven ways in which you can support Pagan community. I heartily agree with all her recommendations.

“So now, as we pull into the harvest season, let’s start thinking about ways to give back to our vibrant and wide-reaching community. I have a few brilliant ideas (as usual!), some of which will hit you up for cash, others of which only take some time and mindfulness.”

Among her suggestions, Elysia lists supporting the New Alexandrian Library’s fundraising effort (more on that here), helping to send Patrick McCollum to the Awakened World Conference in Italy, and supporting a brand new Pagan Living TV initiative.

Almost all of her suggestions, including volunteering at Pagan Pride, throwing a party for Cherry Hill Seminary, and shopping at Pagan-owned businesses, are about building Pagan infrastructure. It’s about putting our resources back into that which we say we value. Too often our responses to needs within modern Paganism are ad hoc and reactive. This is not to say there aren’t visionaries among us who envision a different way of doing things, but these efforts aren’t well-funded, and are often overwhelmed by the needs they encounter. We are still at a point where simply having physical locations is somewhat novel.

“A Memphis Wiccan group now has a building for worship, becoming one of the first Wiccan groups in the country to do so. The Temple of the Sacred Gift is a local chapter of the Aquarian Tabernacle Church, based out of the state of Washington. They have official non-profit status with the IRS, making them just like any church in Memphis. [...] The temple holds worship every other week and often puts on festivals. About 40 people attend each worship, while hundreds can show up at some of the festivals. Participants include local policemen, lawyers, and business owners.”

Infrastructure, physical spaces, institutions, social services, it’s all about taking care of our own. If we are to be able to cross the threshold into being a movement that can support itself, grow into having the land, temples, libraries, and advocacy organizations many of us dream about, we need to re-think how our interconnected communities work. A problem that the late, great, Isaac Bonewits wrestled with in the years before his death.

“Establishing Pagan charities, or even just creating a culture of generosity inside Pagandom, requires us to face all our individual and group attitudes towards money and fund-raising. Being a Pagan shouldn’t be about just taking the goodies that others have to give, but also about returning our gifts to others, thus passing the good karma along. Among the ancient tribal peoples so many of us seek to emulate, “hosting” and “guesting” involved giving and receiving in complex systems of reciprocal relationships. In fact, those words come from the same Proto-Indo-European root, ghosti, which is also the root of the word “ghost,” referring to a family spirit who must be shown proper respect and be fed with offerings.

Yet the Christian Dualism that saturates our mainstream culture, combined with left-over anti-money ideals of the 1960s counterculture, leads many to assume that money is “profane,” that spiritual people “don’t need” money, and that anyone asking for money in a religious context is “just like” the televangelists (whom we view as dishonest and greedy) or whatever mainstream religion we were brought up in. In an “us vs. them” worldview, remember, anyone who has something about them that resembles anything about someone else we consider evil, is of course, just as evil–or at least comfortably ignorable. These attitudes, of course, justify hanging on to our money rather than sharing it with those in need. Indeed, it usually takes a major disaster to shake us out of our complacency.”

These issues seem more present to me now because I believe we are at the threshold of a great shift. I think we are ready to do things differently, to move in directions we didn’t think were possible. I think we are capable of claiming the very things we say we long for, to shed our sub-cultural cocoon and emerge as a religious movement to be reckoned with. Until then, our activists, clergy, and leaders continue to do the work. For example, while Patrick McCollum is trying to raise money to take part in a global interfaith initiative, he’s also meeting with local politicians to end religious discrimination against minority faiths in the California prison system.

Patrick McCollum with California State Senator Mark DeSaulnier and aide (08/25/12)

Patrick McCollum with California State Senator Mark DeSaulnier and aide (08/25/12)

“Rev. Patrick McCollum met this week with California State Senator, Mark DeSaulnier to discuss religious discrimination issues and policies directed toward minority faiths within California’s state institutions.  The institutions discussed included the Department of Mental Health, the Department of Developmental Services, the Department of Social Services, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

The meeting went well and Senator DeSaulnier, who is known for government reform, has agreed to investigate further into the policies and issues affecting our community and others.  Reverend McCollum will have follow up meetings with the Senator, and has agreed to provide additional documentation.”

Every day, in ways we don’t see or notice, there are Pagans working to build our future. If we want to see that future become a reality we need to support them in their work, and show that we’re collectively ready to build the movement many of us say we want.  That support doesn’t have to break your bank, but it can mean working to make sure your local community is thriving, to make sure your elders aren’t in danger, to make sure the people who serve you can do so without the wolf at their door. Support is simple, and it allows visionaries the room to help collectively build our Pagan future.

[The following is a guest post from Michael Smith. Michael Smith, Gwydion Stormcrow, has been practicing Wicca, Magick, and various esoteric disciplines since 1989. He has been active in the pagan community since 1993 when he became a member of the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel (ASW), a Wiccan organization in the Mid-Atlantic region. He is an Elder of the ASW and is currently serving as High Priest of Coven of the Rowan Star, a coven in that Tradition. He is also involved with the Tradition's New Alexandrian Library.]

(Skimmers, the bold is for you! ;-) )

The New Alexandrian Library (an Indigogo fundraising drive) is a project that has been in process since 2000, when the idea was first presented to the larger pagan community at the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel (the Assembly) at the first Between the Worlds Conference. The dream was and remains to create an academic-quality repository for the writing, art, cultural artifacts and wisdoms of religions and practices in the esoteric traditions (‘Pagans’, for lack of a more convenient label).

Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary with Assembly Elders at NAL's foundation.

Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary with Assembly Elders at NAL’s foundation.

The primary aims of the Library are: 1) to secure the resources to ensure the Library is wholly owned and administered by Pagans and contributes to the real-asset community infrastructure; 2) provide ongoing stewardship for our communities’ work and essence; and 3) make the collected materials as convenient as possible for the community to access. Ultimately, the Library will be a resource to support new academic study and research to further develop our community for centuries to come.

It is vitally important at this time that we create and maintain real pagan infrastructure. The transition from the Age of Pisces to the Age of Aquarius threatens the continued dominance of the current mass religions and they have reacted by trying to institutionalize their faiths in the secular realms of government and law. The ‘major religions’ fear diminishing dominance in the new Age and that has resulted in collections of pagan materials being marginalized or made unavailable in and by the large non-pagan institutions that now hold them – even more than when we were just considered ‘unimportant’. Many collections are difficult to access or are maintained in obscurity. Much of the accumulated wisdom of pagan people has been lost in past times of transition. We must make serious effort to create structures to ensure as a much as possible gets through this transition.

This Library will be/is owned and stewarded by a Wiccan organization, in services to the wider esoteric community. The collections will not be marginalized in some dark, inaccessible backroom of an indifferent institution. The whole purpose of this project is to ensure that our culture, philosophy, wisdom and creation have another stage to be seen, studied and expanded!

New Alexandrian Library foundation.

New Alexandrian Library foundation.

Assembly members believe so strongly in this need that 80% of the funds to build the project has come from Assembly members (>$150,000 to date) and several members have donated shared ownership of ~100 acres of forest to the ASW and the Library project. The land, the structures and all of its materials will be in the stewardship of a Pagan Tradition. Plans are also being made, of course, to establish long-term resources for maintenance of this living treasure of our community.

Mind you, of course, none of us are rich. We share this to let you know that we are not just spending other people’s hard earned donations – that we put our money where our mouth is. But, make no mistake, this cannot happen to its potential without the financial support of the wider community to create and maintain this vital resource.

As our many of our seminal teachers, visionaries, leaders and thinkers pass to the next life – their collected wisdom is often lost. We have all heard stories of decades of newsletters, articles, teachings, research, vision, and other inspiration being lost because there was simply no place for these collections to go. Often times, non-pagan family members do not recognize the value of their loved ones’ work to the larger pagan community. Sometimes, it is simply thrown out.

Each time this happens it is a tragic loss to the entire community. Every living tradition must have connection to its roots, ancient and modern, to help feed it’s grow and evolution. The Library, in network with other efforts like it, will be a solution to this challenge, providing our community Elders with a resource that can receive, preserve and honor their work.

And, of course, researchers, academics, teachers, seekers and the curious must have access to the collection to inspire deeper understanding of our history, theologies, worldviews, and concepts – as well as greater appreciation of the viewpoints of other esoteric paths. The Library will continue its efforts to make sure that as much of the collection as possible is accessible via the web, inter-pagan-library lending and onsite visits. In this way, the Library will be a cornerstone of the new magickal renaissance, encouraging expansion of esoteric theory and philosophy and of honest and open interchange of ideas and experiences between paths.

We are nearing fruition of over a decade of work. The Library is rising! It is heart stirring to walk out to the site and see the physical manifestation of this idea coming to life, the dome rising into the air like the dawning sun, the coming of a new light of understanding into the world – and our pagan world.

We do not ask for your financial support lightly. We are in this for the long haul to benefit the current generation of witches, pagans, magicians, shamans, druids, and everyone else and to leave behind a growing legacy of learning, scholarship, experience and ecstasy for future generations. We are the Ancestors of the lines of magickal thinkers and doers in the future. Even as we have built upon that which was left to us from ancient and not-so-ancient times, so too will our work become the foundation upon which our heirs will build. Help us all leave a heritage worthy of honor to those that follow. With your donations, New Alexandrian Library will become a part of the foundation and legacy we leave, with optimism and blessings, to the future.

If you believe in this vision of our esoteric community surviving and thriving into the new Age with vigor and foresight, make a donation to the New Alexandrian Library at our Indigogo fundraising drive (http://igg.me/p/190140).

To date, 686 people have visited the indigogo campaign. If everyone that visited donated only $50-75 (and got a sweet chant CD or two as a thank you!), we would have enough to birth this important pagan asset and have a weatherproof, concrete, long-lived repository for a great collection of the esoteric community’s thoughts, teachings and essence – for all of us!

Be a part of the coming Magickal Renaissance. Thank you!

A bright and ongoing success story in the Pagan community has been the utilization of crowd-funding sites like IndieGoGo and Kickstarter to collectively raise funds for important projects. Starhawk raised over $75,000 dollars to help fund a pitch-reel in order get a feature film based on her book “The Fifth Sacred Thing” made. Peter Dybing helped raise $30,000 dollars for Doctors Without Borders in the wake of the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami. Pagan singer-songwriter SJ Tucker was amazed when a Kickstarter campaign for Tricky Pixie’s European tour more than doubled their initial goal in a matter of hours (and kept on growing). In addition, several smaller initiatives have managed to collectively raise thousands for Pagan projects: The readers of The Wild Hunt funded my upcoming trip to the American Academy of Religion’s Annual Meeting, Chicago-based Pagan/magical performance troupe Terra Mysterium raised funds for their new show “The Alembic,” and the Goddess community funded a documentary film in honor of Merlin Stone.

Crowdfunding sites allow an easy mechanism for fundraising in communities that may have social networks and organizations, but not the robust money-raising infrastructure of already-established mainstream institutions. This is a place modern Paganism is in today, and more and more of us are turning to these sites as a solution to our “money problem.” There are hundreds of thousands of Pagans out there, millions around the world, and they desire to see our projects and initiatives advance just as much as any other faith community. So I’ve started a new feature to regularly check in on fundraising campaigns within our interconnected communities in hopes of giving them wider exposure, and also documenting the crowdfunding phenomenon as it relates to modern Pagans. I hope you’ll find things to support, and also learn important lessons in what makes a campaign succeed.

Send Patrick McCollum to Awakened World 2012: Longtime readers should be familiar with Pagan chaplain and activist Patrick McCollum. Patrick has been working as a Pagan chaplain and activist for well over twenty years. He was one of the founding members of the Lady Liberty League, and has been involved in numerous legal struggles involving modern Pagans. In 2008, he testified before the US Commission on Civil Rights on prisoner’s religious rights, saying he “found discrimination against minority faiths everywhere”and that the problem was “endemic.” Today his work continues as he travels the world acting as global ambassador for modern Paganism, visiting India, Jordan, Thailand, and other locales, advocating for cooperation and sharing a Pagan perspective with the world’s religions. Because of his work he’s been invited to be a facilitator at Awakened World 2012 in Rome, Italy. To get there he needs to raise 3,500 dollars to cover his expenses.

“I have been invited to join the Dalai Lama’s International Peace Council and the Association for Global New Thought as a Core Group Leader to help facilitate a world event in Rome, Italy, Awakened World 2012 this October. The event will be attended by many of the foremost political, religious and human rights leaders in the world, and my fellow Core Group team will include such luminaries as: Yolande IIiano, Chairperson, Religions for Peace Europe, HH Pujya Swami Chidananda Saraswati, President of Parmarth Niketan Ashram in India, one of India’s largest spiritual institutions, Sister Joan Chittister, OSB, CO-Chair of the Global Peace Initiative for Women, His Eminence Walter Cardinal Kasper, President, Pontifical Council for Ecumenism, Ela Gandhi, former South African Parliamentarian and granddaughter of Mahatma Gandhi, Dean Lawrence Carter, Dean of Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, Rev. Marcus Braybrooke, President of the World Congress of Faiths, and Lynne Twist of the Pachamama Alliance and others.

Each of the esteemed Core Group Leaders are being supported by their communities to attend and facilitate the gathering, and so I am asking you my spiritual community, to join together and support me also, so our voices will be heard and Paganism and Earth Based Spiritual Traditions will be represented at the table when the discussions regarding the future of our planet take place.”

The event takes place this October, so Patrick has only a month to raise the money. If you want to support Patrick McCollum’s work, please spread the word or donate to this endeavor. As an aside, I want to note briefly that I helped set up the campaign for the Patrick McCollum Foundation, but I’m not working directly for the foundation on this campaign. All monies go directly to the Patrick McCollum Foundation to fund this trip.

New Alexandrian Library Raises Funds to Finish Construction: At the end of 2011 the New Alexandrian Library, a project that hopes to create “a library worthy of its namesake” focused on esoteric knowledge, mystical and the spiritual writings from many traditions, officially broke ground on their physical space in Delaware.  Last month the foundations for that library were poured for the dome structure that will be erected. Now,an IndieGoGo fundraiser has been launched to pay for the next stage of construction. I originally reported on this campaign at the beginning of August, and since then they’ve managed to raise over $3000 dollars towards their $12,500 goal. There are 21 days left to go, so if you want to help realize a physical Pagan-owned and run library on the East Coast this is an excellent time to join the campaign.

“The New Alexandrian Library (NAL) will be a resource for those that believe in true freedom and equality for religious studies – a resource that includes all of the esoteric and non-mainstream (but growing!) religions – not just the the usual 3 or 4.  The NAL will make as much content (literature, periodicals, art…) available via the web the greates extent allowed by copyright law, etc.  - so it can be a true resource for ALL of those that can benefit from such a resource!

We are the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel, a legally recognized Wiccan non-profit religious organization based in the Mid-Atlantic region. The form of Wicca that the Assembly practices is syncretic and draws inspiration from Astrology, Qabala, the Western Magickal Tradition and the folk religions of Europe. Keepers of the Holly Chalice, the founding coven of the Assembly began its life in February of 1984. The Assembly was incorporated in the state of Delaware in 1993 and was granted 501(c)(3) status by the IRS in 1995.”

The NAL project has already started building an impressive collection, one that includes the recent acquisition of rare Dion Fortune paintings gifted by Dolores Ashcroft Nowicki. As NAL board member Ivo Dominguez Jr says in the video above, this is a project initiated by us, for us, one that deserves our support so that it can become a reality. For more information check out their Facebook page, or go to their official website. You can read all of The Wild Hunt’s coverage of the New Alexandrian Library project, here. I’m hoping to further spotlight this initiative in the near future with a guest post from the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel.

A Pagan Chamber Choir Hopes to Fund First CD: The Orpheus Pagan Chamber Choir, located in Denver, Colorado, seeks to “build community by  sharing  with our audiences the power and beauty of choral music from many historical and cultural traditions.” As this Pagan choir has gained attention within their local community, more and more people have asked when they will record a CD of their music, so they’ve launched this fundraiser to make it happen.

“Ever since Orpheus was founded, people have been asking, “Do you have a CD?” With your help, we’ll be able to say, “Yes, and here it is!” We’ve become known for our unique events: our Twelfth Night Yule Concert & Viking Feast, our programs that fuse ancient with future. Why should our CD be different? We want to make the world premiere recording of the powerful Missa Druidica, our unique covers of Mummers’ Dance, Ancient Mother, We Won’t Wait, and other favorite Orpheus tunes.

We want to record just the way you love us: live musicians doing something that seems to touch people’s souls. We’re over 30 voices and instrumentalists. We can’t just hole up in someone’s garage and turn on a switch. If we were in Hollywood or New York, we could find a studio large enough to hold all of us, but here in Denver we need to rent space and a satellite recording truck! And we’re not using digital instrumental sounds either. It will be all live, all real, all Orpheus.”

They’ve already raised $1,475 of their $4000 goal, with 43 days left to go on their campaign. A $25 dollar donation gets you a pre-released edition of the CD. So if you’re a fan of Pagan choral music, be sure to check this campaign out!

Those are the highlighted campaigns for this edition. Please send me word your crowdfunding campaigns, and I may spotlight them on a future edition of this new feature. Let’s all work together to promote important projects within our community, and destroy the notion that we can’t or won’t fund projects that are important to us. If you can’t donate, the best way to help is to share these campaigns to your social networks, exposing them to as many people as possible. Thanks for reading, and thank you for supporting Pagan community!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Judge Rules Against Maetreum of Cybele Exemptions: The Maetreum of Cybele, Magna Mater, in an ongoing tax battle with the Town of Catskill, New York, has just lost their exemption battle before the New York State Supreme Court. While Judge Platkin acknowledged the Maetreum as a valid religion, he denied their building tax exemption on the grounds that the charitable purposes of the building were incidental to  its function.

The Maetreum of Cybele's building.

The Maetreum of Cybele’s building.

“The Court finds that petitioner has not satisfied its burden of demonstrating that the primary actual use of the property is in furtherance of the Maetreum’s religious mission. Rather, the record developed at trial establishes that the property primarily is used to provide affordable cooperative housing to a small number of co-religionists, with the religious and charitible uses of the property being merely incidental to that primary non-exempt use.”

Rev Cathryn Platine says she is devastated by the news, and doubts she has the fiscal or physical resources to continue this fight, noting that the process has “taken a huge toll on me personally regarding my health.” That said, Plataine says an appeal of this decision, and filing for a stay on foreclosure against the property are probably the next steps she will take. In a previous public statement, Rev Platine noted that the town has spent an estimated quarter of a million dollars to deny their exemptions, while the Maetreum is over ten thousand dollars in debt from the proceedings. Acting Catskill Town Supervisor Patrick Walsh stated in 2011 that the town was already too deep into the case to give up and that significant dollars could be saved by preventing exemptions for illegitimate religions.” For those wanting to an make a tax-deductible donation to their $10,000+ legal bill, you can do so directly via paypal to: centralhouse@gallae.com. Or you can contact them through their website.

Reclaiming Co-Founder Withdraws From Tradition: M. Macha NightMare (Aline O’Brien), a co-founder of the Reclaiming tradition, and co-author of “The Pagan Book of Living and Dying” with Starhawk, has announced on her blog that she is parting ways from the tradition she helped found, saying she “no longer feel[s] that its principles and practices accord” with her own.

M. Macha NightMare on the cover of the upcoming issue of Witches & Pagans.

M. Macha NightMare on the cover of the upcoming issue of Witches & Pagans (out in September).

“I have long felt alienated, estranged, and out of sync with how I’ve seen the tradition devolving. The incompatibilities between Reclaiming and me also trace to loose, undefined standards; lack of accountability; uncivil personal conduct and rude, disrespectful behavior without any restraint or consequences; lack of coherent theology; lack of intellectual rigor; and carelessness in ritual and other aspects of religious practice.” 

NightMare/O’Brien, who also serves on the board of Cherry Hill Seminary, is not the only prominent Reclaiming Witch to express discomfort with the tradition as it exists today, Anne Hill, who co-wrote “Circle Round: Raising Children in Goddess Traditions,” declared herself “Remaining” in 2007 and that she is “staying connected on my own terms, choosing my battles, and letting the rest go.” What this development means for Reclaiming, and its development, is uncertain. What is certain is that an elder and co-founder publicly severing ties with a tradition they helped found is a call to reflection on how this state of affairs came to be.

New Alexandrian Library Raises Funds to Finish Construction: At the end of 2011 the New Alexandrian Library, a project that hopes to create “a library worthy of its namesake” focused on esoteric knowledge, mystical and the spiritual writings from many traditions, officially broke ground on their physical space in Delaware.  Last month the foundations for that library were poured for the dome structure that will be erected. Now, an IndieGoGo fundraiser has been launched to pay for the next stage of construction.

“The NAL will serve to support and advance serious academic study for new, non-mainstream, esoteric, ‘living’ religions that are most likely to be the guiding forces in guiding the Earth and Humans back to health and evolution of Spirit in the coming century. Like the original Great Library of Alexandria, the schools of Qabala in medieval Spain, and the flourishing of magick that occurred in renaissance Italy, the diverse confluence of minds and resources would result in great leaps forward in theory and practice. The NAL will be one of the cornerstones (of many created by various groups across the globe we hope!) of a new magickal renaissance. The benefits of this growing network for future generations will be incalculable.”

The goal is $12,500 by September 11th. So far NAL has raised $1345 towards that goal. The NAL project has already started building an impressive collection, one that includes the recent acquisition of rare Dion Fortune paintings gifted by Dolores Ashcroft Nowicki. As NAL board member Ivo Dominguez Jr says in the video above, this is a project initiated by us, for us, one that deserves our support so that it can become a reality. For more information check out their Facebook page, or go to their official website. You can read all of The Wild Hunt’s coverage of the New Alexandrian Library project, here.

Spiral Scouts Honor Eagle Scout Protest: Due to an ongoing policy of the Boy Scouts of America “not granting membership to open or avowed homosexuals,” one recently affirmed by its leadership, a growing number of Eagle Scouts, the organization’s elite members (including Circle Sanctuary Minister  Bob Paxton), have been resigning their membership and sending back their badges and medals. Now, alternative scouting organization SpiralScouts International has announced that they are offering any Eagle Scout who returned their badges in protest their highest honors.

“SpiralScouts International respects the leadership, and responsibility demonstrated by these brave men, who have returned their Eagle Scout badges over this disagreement. We offer each of you the honorary status of ‘PathFinder’, and the Award of ‘Founder’ (our Eagle Scout Equivalent) within SpiralScouts. This is our highest rank, and as you have set forth to hold to the ideals of understanding, equality, and leadership, that we strive for within SSI, it would be our honor to extend this to you. Our program, which began in 1999, was developed to be as inclusive as possible in all areas: it features coed groups and leaders and is nondiscriminatory in all regards (sexual orientation, religion, gender). The program is available to all children, and we are happy to be able to offer this option for scouts.”

SpiralScouts International, which is a project of the Aquarian Tabernacle Church, says that “although it cannot repair the hurt that has been caused, we hope this gesture lends support to those who are struggling, and helps us take a step forward into a future that embraces all of us as the sacred beings that each of us are.” Contact information for the SpiralScouts can be found, here.

That’s all I have for now! As always, if you have community news you’d like to share, please drop me a line.