A Darker Shade of Pagan: Top Ten of 2012

While I generally keep my music podcast, A Darker Shade of Pagan, from getting entangled in the daily workings of The Wild Hunt, every once in awhile I like to alert my readership of some great Pagan and Pagan-friendly music that I come across. Since I posted my ADSOP top ten of 2012 show on Sunday, I thought I would share what I thought were some of the best albums that speak to the Pagan soul from the past year. Consider it a gift-giving guide to the Pagan in your life looking for something different in the way of “Pagan music”. ADSOP’s Top Ten Albums of 2012:

10. Hexvessel – “No Holier Temple” [Purchase]

Dubbing themselves “forest folk from Finland,” Hexvessel first gained attention with 2011’s “Dawnbearer,” but it is with “No Holier Temple” that the band take their psychedelic folk-rock sound to new heights. Sounding like an ahead-of-its-time lost treasure from the vaults, Hexvessel could have gotten caught in becoming a mere tribute to the bands that inspired them, but luckily the sounds here are fresh thanks to inventive compositions and a judicious use of modern elements.

A Quick Note on Sacred Music

There are a couple stories I’m in the midst of writing, but none are quite ready for primetime. So instead I’d like to chat a bit about music. I’m about to record this week’s episode of A Darker Shade of Pagan, and I’m getting ready to see the great Peter Murphy in concert this evening. So music is foremost on my mind.
Murphy is, of course, a famous student of Sufi mysticism and religion, and that sense of the sacred imbues his work.

A Darker Shade of Pagan: Top Ten of 2011

While I generally keep my music podcast A Darker Shade of Pagan from getting entangled in the daily workings of The Wild Hunt, every once in awhile I like to alert my readership of some great Pagan and Pagan-friendly music that I come across. Since I just posted my ADSOP top ten of 2011 show, I thought I would share what I thought were some of the best albums that speak to the Pagan soul from the past year. Consider it a gift-giving guide to the Pagan in your life looking for something different in the way of “Pagan music”. ADSOP’s Top Ten Albums of 2011:

10. Metal Mother – “Bonfire Diaries” [Purchase]

A project of Bay Area singer-songwriter Tara Tati, Metal Mother is a winsome mix of ethereal textures and tribal art-pop that do a great showcasing Tati’s expressive vocal style. Tati, a “student of many esoteric traditions,” sings about connection with the earth, politics, relationships, and freedom in way that evokes that California spiritual ethos she has emerged from.

A Darker Shade of Pagan: Top Ten of 2010

While I generally keep my music podcast A Darker Shade of Pagan from getting entangled in the daily workings of The Wild Hunt, every once in awhile I like to alert my readership of some great Pagan and Pagan-friendly music that I come across. Since I just posted my ADSOP top ten of 2010 show, I thought I would share what I thought were some of the best albums that speak to the Pagan soul from the past year. Consider it a gift-giving guide to the Pagan in your life dissatisfied by what usually passes for “Pagan music”. ADSOP’s Top Ten Albums of 2010

10. Various Artists – “We Are All One in the Sun: Tribute to Robbie Basho” [Purchase: CD, MP3]

A tribute to the seminal composer and guitarist Robbie Basho, this collection gathers several modern-day psych-folk (and folk-folk) luminaries to interpret his work, including Arborea, Fern Knight, and Meg Baird. While none of the artists may approach Basho’s mastery of the guitar, they do succeed in channeling his expansive and esoteric spirit.

Announcing: The Movement of Sound

As long-time readers of The Wild Hunt know, I’m a lover of music. In years past I’ve been a radio DJ, a club DJ, a concert promoter, and music columnist. I keep my hand in by hosting a weekly streaming radio show and podcast called A Darker Shade of Pagan. For years I’ve been focused on discovering great new music that appeals to my personal Pagan sensibility, but I’ve noticed that this task is becoming more difficult. While there is more great Pagan and Pagan-friendly music than ever before, the venues in which we can discover this music, or to simply keep track of the artists we like, have shrunk. This trend started in 2008 when the Pagan-friendly music services Woven Wheat Whispers and Dancing Ferret/Noir Records both closed down.