Archives For Treadwell’s Bookshop

coruSAN FRANCISCO – Members of the Priesthood of Coru Cathubodua and its allies attended the city’s pride event to offer assistance with medical aid, safety escorting, and spiritual protection. Wearing their distinctive red priesthood shirts, the members were stationed throughout the event with first aid kits and other “parade-related accessories.”

Communications chief Scott H. Rowe said, “In a time when the currents of hatred and intolerance have been permeating our national and cultural consciousness, events like Pride, which uplift and celebrate diversity, are more important than ever. In order that the LGBTQ community are free to celebrate safely, it is particularly important for community members who are able to do so to offer protection and support.”

Coru Cathubodua is often found assisting at similar events around the Bay Area. Along with Solar Cross Temple, the group also sponsors an annual blood drive at PantheaCon. The front page of their website displays the priesthood’s continued commitment to hospitality, safety, equality and justice. With regards to the weekend’s pride events, Rowe said, “The Coru Cathubodua Priesthood remains dedicated to supporting their LGBTQ friends, allies, and members with both spiritual and practical needs.”

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13435330_994220324031940_2673996563045981439_nTWH – After the tragedy struck in Orlando, many Pagans and Heathens throughout the world asked, “What can we do to help?” A group consisting of Pagans from both Italy and the U.K. came up with an idea. They call it “Wands up for Orlando.” As noted on the site, “[The project] aims are to support the LGBTQIA community and celebrate our connection as the answer to hate by sharing ceremonies, artistic contributions, poetry, photos, songs, etc.”

For their first task, the group is currently encouraging people to join with them in a ritual to honor those who died in the Orlando attack. A ritual was jointly written and translated into six languages for use by any groups or individuals. It is also not tradition- or practice-specific. The organizers explain, “We want to emphasise that, as many of the dead may have been Catholics or have had an ambivalent relationship with religion, we are being respectful of that. We performed divinations to check that the ritual would be welcome and needed.”

Where did the name come from? Fans of the Harry Potter franchise might recognize the gesture. Group co-founder Salvatore Caci explained, just as Hogwarts students raised their wands to sweep away an evil curse, “we want to sweep away the curses of intolerance and violence with the light that shines from our hearts and hands joined together and in support of one another.” Caci and the other founders hope that this ritual is only a beginning.

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imagesUK – In a vote that shocked much of the world, the United Kingdom opted to exit the European Union. The vote was close, and the subsequent reactions have been mixed. But the story does not end there, as this historic vote has left many uncertainties it its wake. Our UK news correspondent Claire Dixon has spent the weekend talking with U.K. Pagans about the vote, their concerns, and their predictions for the future. Tomorrow, she will bring us that report, along with a broader look at the situation from an insider perspective.

In Other News

  • The Bay Area Pagan Alliance was another Pagan group in attendance at this past weekend’s San Francisco pride events. Along with enjoying the festivities and supporting the LGBTQ community, the alliance also setup a donation booth through which volunteers helped bring in funds that would ultimately support their own popular annual May festival. The Alliance’s Facebook page shows photos of volunteers working at the booth and also enjoying the day. The alliance did say that, in the end, the money raised will take care of a good portion of the festival budget, but they will still need more fundraising before spring 2017.
  • New York Pagans are getting ready for their annual summer event. The 5th Annual WitchsFest USA is a popular “street faire” held in the heart of Manhattan’s West Village on Astor Place between Broadway and Lafayette. The faire includes presenters, performers, vendors and more. Last year’s WitchsFest was attended by Vice reporter Farah Al Qasimi, who shared colorful and dazzling photos of many of the attendees.
  • T. Thorn Coyle continues sharing her voice successfully through her fiction writing. One of her short stories, titled Salt, was recently selected to be included in an urban fantasy book bundle along with nineteen other books that explore the “hidden magic in everyday life.” Coyle’s story, about “a ghost-talking, magic-wielding, leather daddye,” was originally part of her “free fiction” series supported by her readers through Patreon. Coyle is also the author of the novel Like Water as well as several non-fiction book on Witchcraft, spirituality and daily practice.


  • The Many Gods West conference is coming up in just over one month. It is in its second year and one of the few annual indoor conferences held over the summer. It bills itself as a “gathering for polytheists.” This year’s event features Marcella “Allec” McGuire, Sean Donahue, and L. Phaedrus. There will be no keynote speaker, as the organizers explain, “We have forgone the keynote speaker model in order to encourage the event to grow as a gathering of peers.” Many Gods West is held in Olympia, Washington from Aug 5-7.
  • Starhawk announced that she will be giving away two special edition autographed copies of her new book City of Refuge. To enter the drawing, fans only need to “like” the post and post a quote from any of her books into the comments section. The two winners will be drawn and announced on July 1. Starhawk has also listed all the rules and regulations on her website.
  • Speaking of summer reading, Lewellyn Publishing will be releasing two new books in July, both of which may be of interest to many of our readers. First, Witch and priestess Lasara Firefox Allen shares “a new system that embraces the powerful, diverse, and fluid nature of the lived experience of women today” in her book Jailbreaking the Goddess: A Radical Revisioning of Feminist Spirituality. Second, Devin Hunter’s The Witch’s Book of Power explores “the secrets to unlocking the Witch power within you.” He includes exercises, meditations and practices.
  • If that is not enough to fill your days, Weiser published Judith Illes how-to guide called The Big Book of Practical Spells: Everyday Magic that Works.  And, Moon Books has just released Morgan Daimler’s Fairycraft: Following the Path of Fairy Witchcraft, and Rachel Patterson and Tracy Roberts’ book titled, Arc of the Goddess. 
  • Lastly, Treadwell’s conference exploring the 1980s Satanic Abuse panic is coming up Tuesday, July 5. With the help of six speakers, attendees will explore the history and psychology behind the moral panic that gripped the UK and many other parts of the world.  Discussions will also include “what it was like for Pagans, and then how it ended after researchers and investigative journalism got involved.”

[Today we welcome guest writer Link with his review of the upcoming Philip Heselton book. A Gardnerian initiate, Link is a member of the Covenant of the Goddess (CoG) and is the US National Coordinator for the Pagan Federation International. The name “Link” is a simple, one-syllable reminder of how all things interconnect. Link’s writing focuses on seeing the sacred and magickal side of everyday life, and has been published in many parts of the world since the 1990s. Jobwise, he has worked for several international telecommunications companies in the US, Europe and Latin America, again a lesson in how things connect. He currently lives in Miami Beach.]

dvwReview: Doreen Valiente – Witch. Written by Philip Heselton. Published by the Center for Pagan Studies in cooperation with the Doreen Valiente Foundation, (pp. 357)

Philip Heselton, has done it again!  

His latest book, an in-depth biography of Doreen Valiente, tells Doreen’s story like never told before. While many of us may be familiar with parts of Doreen’s life, this biography enables us to know her not just as a witch or as an author, but as a person. As we learn about Doreen through reading the book, we also learn about the Craft which she helped shape, and we connect more deeply with its roots.  

There are countless nuggets of precious information about Doreen and the early days of the Craft scattered all about our communities, buried deep over the decades. Heselton’s research gathers them all together, creating a beautiful mosaic of Doreen’s life, presented in over 340 pages. Heselton probed public records and published works, but more importantly he talked with everyone and anyone who may have had any information. For those that who knew Doreen well, he documented their fond memories of her. 

For example, Heselton shares bits of a conversation that he had with one of Doreen’s family members:

There’s a lot of things about Doreen that were secret… She used to disappear and they didn’t know where she was, not even her mother. (p. 39)

Other personal conversations cited include Heselton’s talks with Fred Lamond and Dayonis, both former members of Gerald Gardner’s Bricket Wood coven in England during the 1950s. There are also quotes from Patricia Crowther, Lois Bourne, Janet Farrar and many others. He includes a remembrance by Jean Williams recalling how Doreen cast the circle with her broomstick, “taking command of the space.” She summed up Doreen quite well, saying:

I have never before, or since, witnessed such natural authority. (p. 284)

Some of these people are elders in their own right who will not be here to tell their stories and answer our questions forever. Perhaps the best way to describe this book is that it is not just a biography, but it is a public service and a true gift to the Craft community.  

There is an entire chapter devoted to the times that Doreen and Patricia Crowther had spent together. Entitled “Record of a Friendship” the chapter uncovers a treasure of memories about these two amazing ladies, putting many rare cherished recollections within easy reach, recorded for generations to come. Heselton includes a story told by Patricia Crowther of a ritual she did with Doreen and others; shortly afterwards an amazing piece of poetry was channeled. Heselton introduces Crowther’s story:

On one such visit, on 25th September 1968 a dramatic event occurred. At the request of a London witch, Andrew Demain, it was decided to conduct a night-time ritual in the hollow above the Long Man of Wilmington, an ancient chalk carving on the South Downs between Eastbourne and Lewes… (p. 225)

The morning after the ritual, Crowther awoke with the poem “The Awakening,” in her head.

The book is generously laced with photos of Doreen as well as the people, places and things that were part of her life. This includes some photos which have never been published before.  

doreen valiente

[Courtesy of the Doreen Valiente Foundation]

From the very start, Doreen’s life was magickal indeed. In the chapter entitled “Child of the Goat-God” we learn about Doreen’s birth, including the reason why the doctor who delivered Doreen did so while wearing full evening dress and Masonic Regalia. By age 7, she was very aware of her natural psychic ability and at age 13 she performed something quite amazing to successfully protect her home and family.

Heselton has uncovered details about Doreen’s life which only a super-sleuth could have found. For example, as a young woman during World War II Doreen was talented in translations, transcription and linguistics – skills which the British Government looked favorably upon as part of their wartime intelligence work. The chapter entitled “Glimpses through the Shadows” begins with Heselton explaining: 

Whatever Doreen did during the war, it was shrouded in secrecy. She never said anything about it herself. The most we get are odd hints that set us on what becomes a fascinating trail. (p. 39)

This book is an important piece of research that unveils new layers in not just Doreen’s life, but in the history of the Craft as well. For example, many people have heard that Gerald Gardner initiated Doreen. However, Heselton also reveals that another person was initiated that same night. Who were they and why were they initiated with Doreen? No spoilers.

If I had to choose one area of her life I would have liked to read more about in this biography, it would be more details on times spent with Gerald and the early days of the Craft. Regardless, the book brings to life many facets of Doreen that I ever knew before. What were her favorite sports to bet on? What was her system to pick winners at horse racing? What “old spell” did her mother perform when Doreen was a child?

Many might not know that Doreen helped form the first known “Pagan rights” organization named the Witch’s Defense League and yet another more assertive group called the Pagan Front. Today’s well-respected organizations such as the Pagan Federation, Covenant of the Goddess, Lady Liberty League and others were born many years later.

[Courtesy Doreen Valiente Foundation]

[Courtesy Doreen Valiente Foundation]

To those who have read Doreen’s work, or who feel a Craft connection to her, this book is a must-read and a very effective means to know her on a deeper level. For those who are not familiar with her or her work, the book presents an amazing story of a strong and powerful-minded woman who truly took her own spirituality by the reigns. Author, wife, high priestess, poet. And witch. Doreen’s story charts the many steps she took on her own path — just as we too may have taken as seekers, hungering to learn, learning by doing, and then passing on a lifetime of experiences as a guide for others. Even mainstream readers not familiar with Wicca would find useful insights in this book as a tale of one woman’s journey and an example of how a spiritual quest can shape (and reshape) one’s entire life.  

Heselton’s writing style is warm and personal; on each page you can truly feel the affection in the author’s voice and the high regard in which he held Doreen. Unlike many of today’s Pagan authors, his writing is highly structured with an academic professionalism. Heselton not only paints a beautiful seascape of her life, but also footnotes each grain of sand with surgical precision wherever possible, citing its source. If you are the type of reader who uses footnotes like kindling and a catalyst to dig deeper into a subject, you will appreciate his work.

The book also includes an appendix detailing a chronology of Doreen’s life, and another appendix with a special message from John Belham-Payne, her last High Priest. In “Doreen as I Knew Her,” he describes her as a bit of a hippy chick: 

With revolution in the air I think she felt the promise of freedom of expression and thought.  For Doreen, that never went away. (p. 315)

Toward the closing of the book there is a visionary piece written by Trustee Ashley Mortimer describing the formation of the Doreen Valiente Foundation. He writes: 

Doreen’s presence pervades every aspect of the entire modern Pagan community, from the words spoken in ritual to the very way we think about our Paganism and look outwards towards the rest of society,” Ashley explains.  “We need the world to understand that Doreen Valiente’s legacy belongs to everyone… (p. 327)

And with “everyone” in mind, the Foundation was formed as a non-profit public trust that will carry Doreen’s contributions well into the future. So perhaps the book’s ending is really just the beginning

Published by the Centre for Pagan Studies in association with the Doreen Valiente FoundationDoreen Valiente – Witch will be officially released in February 2016. The book launch will be held at the prestigious Treadwell’s Bookshop in LondonPre-orders are now being taken on a first-come first served basis. Buying directly from the foundation supports the two organizations which have been preserving Doreen’s work, and offers the opportunity for a personalized autographed copy signed by Philip Heselton.

Just as Jack Bracelin’s biography “Gerald Gardner – Witch” has become a cornerstone of Craft bookshelves around the world, this book will too.

Jean Williams 1928 – 2015

Heather Greene —  December 31, 2015 — 1 Comment


On Saturday, it was announced the Wiccan High Priestess Jean Williams had died on Friday, Dec 25. The announcement read, “Gracious, sociable and non-dogmatic, [Jean] relished the variety of paths and personalities in paganism. Also in some ways a very private person, in her personal spiritual life she was a Wiccan high priestess of the Gardnerian tradition, with a quiet and close-knit coven who are very much her intimate family.”

Jean Elen Williams was born in the village of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, and was the third child of a Church of England vicar. From a very early age, she attended private boarding school, and then later enrolled at theUniversity of College London, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology, then want on to have a very successful career as a social researcher.

In the late 1950s, Jean became interested in consciousness expansion, as both a spiritual seeker and a psychologist. Through that interest she met members of Gerald Gardner’s original coven, now known as The Bricket Wood Coven, in 1961. She studied with them, eventually being initiated.

Over the next decade, Jean found her professional and spiritual interests merging. In a 2004 interview, she said, “As a psychologist who was also on a spiritual path, I became very interested in the ideas about human potential and personal fulfillment beginning to be put forward by the avant garde psychotherapists.” This new thought developed into the “Human Potential movement” or Humanistic Psychology.

As Jean explained, many involved in this movement “went in their droves to India or joined the Rajneesh organisation in Britain.” She said, “I was already a witch and couldn’t understand why they couldn’t find what they were looking for in our own Pagan traditions.” Observing this trend, she saw a need to connect “the human psychology people” with the “indigenous British spiritual paths,” so they wouldn’t have to visit the Far East. At the same time, she saw the need to connect local Wiccans, who often struggled in maintaining community relationships, with the concepts in the Human Potential movement.

As a result, in 1974, Pagan Pathfinders was born. Meetings were held in London in Jean’s newly purchased Victorian home. For years, she and her husband, Zachary Cox, facilitated Pagan Pathfinders, but, as she said, the group was not “a one woman show.” Jean handed the group over to younger Pagan leaders in the early 2000s. It continued to remain active until 2011.

Around the same time that she founded Pagan Pathfinders, Jean also became High Priestess of the Bricket Wood Coven with her husband as priest. Her friend and initiate Christina Oakley-Harrington said that in the 1980s, “the coven befriended and admitted the young anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann in the 1980s, who wrote about the group in her famous study, Persuasions of the Witches’ Craft.

But Jean’s work did not end there. In 1977, she co-founded The Companions of the Rainbow Bridge, a ritual drama group in the Western mysteries, “to encourage inspirational and uplifting creation of ceremonies.” The organization was active for 17 years.

Additionally, she and her husband began inviting a small group of people to their home four time each year and performed Crowley‘s Gnostic Mass. She continued this practice well into the 2000s.

Jean Williams speaking at Pagan Federation event [Courtesy]

Jean Williams speaking at Pagan Federation event [Courtesy]

In 1988, after retirement, Jean focused her energy on helping the UK Pagan community. She became a core member of the Pagan Federation, working through the next two decades as an elder, adviser, teacher and administrator.

More recently, she and her husband authored several books, including The Gods within: The Pagan Pathfinders Book of God and Goddess Evocations (2008), and The Play Goes On (2015).

Despite all of her public work and teaching, Jean was private about her own religious practice and her personal achievements. According to Oakley-Harrington, “Many pagan friends have only recently learnt she was in the Craft; even fewer know she was the high priestess of Gerald Gardner’s first, original Bricket Wood coven, throughout her adult life. For Jean, being of service to paganism was not attached to titles within a particular tradition. She wanted to be known for herself and what she did, not for a title she held in a secret mystery tradition.”

In the 2004 interview, Jean herself said the same thing, “I don’t think that for humanity as a whole you should present yourself as a priest or priestess – you’re just a human being. Any authority you express is purely what comes through you, not what you status say you have.”

Last week, at Whittington Hospital in London with Zach by her side, Jean died of heart failure.

After her death, a public Facebook memorial page was created, where future memorial ceremonies and rites will also be posted. For now, the page is being filled with memories. People are sharing their personal stories of how Jean has touched their lives.

James Scotchford wrote:

Jean was a genuinely lovely and welcoming person, a warm elder in the Pagan community of which she was dedicated. She was a person without ego and never demanded respect, however she got mine. Jean always came and said hello to me at events, like she did others. Sometimes I got jaded at the lack of friendliness and community spirit amongst many Pagans, but Jean was a different matter.

Pagan Federation President Mike Stygal wrote:

Jean had a knack of helping people to be where they needed to be and do what they needed to do. I remember a couple of times when I found myself pointed in the direction of roles serving the Pagan community, it was Jean who had spoken to me about taking on something I really wasn’t certain I could or should do. She referred to it as catching me at a moment of weakness…. something she did with quite a lot of people who have gone on to serve our Pagan community.

Death has caught Jean at a moment of weakness. In life she was an incredible visionary for what could become of individual Pagans and the Pagan community as a whole. Jean was someone who made things happen. It would not surprise me to discover that the gods had plans for Jean and her amazing range of talents.


Jean Williams and Zachary Cox 

Stygal also added, “My last memory of Jean was seeing Zach and Jean walking, hand in hand, towards a car waiting to take them home after the book launch. Both of them still very much in love with each other in their old age.”

Similarly, Agni Keeling said:

I loved how Jean balanced Zach’s approach to discussing the rituals. On a couple of occasions when I had an opportunity to talk to them after the rituals we did, Zach was always very intellectual about the ritual and wanted to know the ‘ideas’ behind it etc. Jean was always pure feeling and vision. Last summer we did ‘Thunder Perfect Mind’ ritual which both Jean and Zach came to. They wanted to talk to me afterwards, Zach wanted to know whys and whats etc, Jean just said that she closed her eyes at the beginning and was transported back to ancient Greece.. and didn’t want to come back.

Oakley-Harrington said:

Everyone will tell you: she was strong, unfailingly gracious, intelligent and fun-loving. She was committed to the idea that those on a spiritual path have a first task to work on their own development as people. Famously, she refused to participate in gossip, and would not tolerate it in her presence. One of her young friends just wrote yesterday, ‘Bitchcraft could not exist in the air she breathed.’ In her presence, and under her influence, younger pagans had a role model of nobility of conduct: this has had an impact upon the entirety of the British pagan community. It was possible because,whilst taking this line, she was fun, funny and canny. To quote the same young friend, ‘Jean was a cat loving, people-shrewd rockstar of the pagan world.’

Jean was a force within the Pagan world for over 50 years. But she was not one that was loud and flashy; nor did she push her ways on others. As was her philosophy, “Have your own religious experience” and don’t tell others how to do it. She remained flexible and accepting with only boundaries based on simple, unassuming ethics and respect.

Jean’s coven maiden, Ruth, now takes the mantle of the high priestesshood of the Bricket Wood coven. Ruth has been both a member of the group and lodger since 1988. She said, “I learnt how to lead a coven from Jean; she had an understated drive and tremendous ritual abilities; from her we learnt how to experience the Goddess and God in a profound way. And she was a fun friend — we were all involved in many magical projects together. I am honoured to have worked with her all these years.”

Jean also leaves a daughter coven, several grand-daughter covens, and a myriad students and others touched by her honest, vivacious and generous spirit.

What is remembered, lives. 

american heathens A new book American Heathens: The Politics of Identity in a Pagan Religious Movement will is now available from Temple University Press. Written by Professor Jennifer Snook, the book “is the first in-depth ethnographic study about the largely misunderstood practice of American Heathenry (Germanic Paganism).” Snook traces the trajectory of the movement itself and highlights stories from modern practitioners.

Snook is a professor of sociology at the University of Mississippi, and has been a practicing Heathen since the age of eighteen. Because of her perspective, the book “treats Heathens as members of a religious movement, rather than simply a subculture reenacting myths and stories of enchantment.”

American Heathens was published on June 12 and is available in print and ebook. For those interested, the publisher’s website is currently offering a content list and a PDF excerpt from chapter one.

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Cambridge University will be hosting a day-long workshop titled “Generation Hex: Politics of Contemporary Paganism.” To be held on September 10, the workshop “aims to explore the political discourses of contemporary Pagan religions, whether Witchcraft, Druidry or Goddess spirituality.”

Organizers say, “Pagan ideologies are interwoven with the political, from the feminist eco-anarchism of Starhawk’s The Spiral Dance, to the conservative racial essentialism of Stephen McNallen. How these representations translate into ethical/political commitments is open to question.” They are currently calling for papers on the topic within the disciplines of “Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Gender and Religion, Study of Religions, Social Anthropology, Intellectual and Political History, Gender Studies, Queer Studies.”

The conveners include Jonathan Woolley, University of Cambridge; Kavita Maya, SOAS, University of London; Elizabeth Cruze, Druid Elder and Activist. For more information they ask that people contact them via email at l

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starhawk 5 19 04


Speaking of Starhawk, she has just announced the publication of the long-awaited sequel to her novel The Fifth Sacred Thing. Written over twenty years ago, The Fifth Sacred Thing has become one of the Starhawk’s most notable and popular works. As she writes, it is a “futuristic novel in which an ecotopian Northern California struggles to resist an invasion by the brutal, militarist Southlands using nonviolence and magic.”

Since that publication, Starhawk moved through many other projects, which even included a potential film version of the novel. But, then in recent years, she returned to the story, saying, “the characters from the world of Fifth were coming alive for me again, clamoring to tell more …” Completed October 2014, the book was shipped to Bantam Publishing, Fifth‘s publisher.

Unforutnately, after several months of waiting, Starhawk received a rejection letter. As a result, she has decided to venture into the world self-publishing. She wrote, “I was mad. Yes, there is an audience for the book … Maybe not Stephen King’s audience, but I believe there are a significant number of people who would like to read the book. And I intend to get it to you all!” The new book, entitled City of Refuge, now has a Facebook page, where readers can follow the Starhawk’s progress on this new adventure.

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Emblem_of_the_United_States_Department_of_the_Army.svgMaking the mainstream media rounds is a report featuring a story that we’ve been following for quite some time. Active-duty Heathens in the U.S. Army continue to push for recognition or, as The Washington Post asks, “Will Thor Join the Army?”

In January, Josh Heath and other Heathen soldiers had been informed that recognition was finally achieved. However, neither Asatru or Heathen was ever added to the approved list. As we reported in June, the decision was put on hold “pending the findings of a Defense Department working group investigating how to create a single set of faith group codes across the service.”

With this recent article, which was produced by Religion News Service, the story has now attracted the attention of mainstream audiences. RNS journalists interviewed Jeremiah McIntyre, an active-duty sergeant who has joined the cause. McIntyre is quoted as saying,”It’s all well and good to be allowed to display my religion on my tombstone, but I’d like to be able to display it while I’m still alive.”  He is, of course, referring to the Department of Veterans affairs acceptance of Thor’s Hammer for gravestones in 2013. While the symbol is accepted for tombstone markers, McIntyre and other Heathens still cannot claim the religion while on active-duty.

The RNS article recounts their struggle, saying that, six month after being informed of acceptance, Heathens are “back to square one.” It also notes that Heath, McIntyre and others are now doubling their efforts with a brand-new letter writing campaign and outreach. Time will only tell if the increase in visibility, both through the new campaign and recent media attention, will help turn the tides in their favor.

In Other News

  • There has been a small update in the Kenny Klein case. In 2014, Klein, a well-known Pagan musician, was charged with the possession of child pornography. Ever since the arrest, his case has been lingering in the Louisiana courts. Now, it is being reported that there are eight charges open, and Klein’s attorney has made a motion for a speedy trial to be heard on August 21. We will continue to bring you updates on this story as they occur.
  • Treadwell’s bookshop in London will be featured in a music video for the up-and-coming singer/songwriter Ben Craig. Owner Christina Oakley Harrington spent Saturday and into Sunday morning at her store while filmmakers did their work. Interestingly, this was not the first time that Treadwell’s was used in a music video. She said, “The last time we hired out the shop the unknown band was a little folksy group called Mumford & Sons.” The video, “White Blank Page (The Bookshop Sessions)” is still available on the internet.
  • Pagan Pride season is getting closer and groups are beginning to announce their programming. Pagan Pride Raleigh, which reportedly attracts over 3,000 people, is held over two days in September. Organizers have added a new feature called “Friends and Family Day” that will focus on educating the non-Pagan public about “Pagan lifestyles.” Further north, Philadelphia Pagan Pride has announced its return on September 5. They are currently looking for vendors, presenters, donations and volunteers. Look for more Pride event announcements in the future.
  • Wild Hunt journalist Terence P. Ward has put together a new book of prayers to Poseidon. Titled Depth of Praise, the book, as Ward explained, “started out as an assignment [directly] from Poseidon. ‘Learn more about me,’ he said, ‘by writing hymns to my epithets’. ” First Ward wrote, “29 separate hymns and prayers that explored [Poseidon’s] aspects.” Seven of those writings will be included in the Bibliotheca Alexandrina volume From the Roaring Deep” and he has since written more. While much of this new devotional is finished, Ward has started a small kickstarter campaign to fund interior illustrations, which he admits that he cannot do himself. He hopes that the final book will contain a good number of line drawings “depicting Poseidon in his many aspects.”
  • Gods and Radicals is now accepting submissions for its first print journal. The subtitle reads, “Forest-edged dreams against Capital Inked Dreams of an Other World.” Editors are looking for everything from prose to poetry; photographs and reviews. All submissions are due Sept 15. Interested parties can contact them at

That’s it for now. Have a nice day!

CORRECTION: We originally reported the publication date of American Heathens as being in August, which was the date given in the press release. However, that date did change and the book is currently available.

[We have changed the monthly “Walking the World” column to “Around the World.” Today we return to the UK with Christina Oakley Harrington, the founding director of Treadwell’s Bookshop in London. Do you like this column and others that feature perspectives from outside the U.S.A.?  If you do, please consider donating to our ongoing Fall Funding Drive. All of the money donated goes back to building The Wild Hunt and expanding our reach so we can feature more international stories and columnists. Please donate today!]

Hallowe’en approaches. Here in London we are in autumn at last. Golden brown leaves are underfoot on the sidewalks of our tree-lined streets here in Bloomsbury, my neighbourhood. Yesterday I walked down to the open market on East Street to buy ten yards of orange fabric to decorate the front window of my occult bookshop. We’re scouting for pumpkins to carve to put around on the display tables amidst the books.

[Courtesy of Treadwell's Bookshop London]

[Courtesy of Treadwell’s Bookshop London]

Halloween is a time for remembering ancestors and, this week, I am honouring the ancestors of the wonderful tradition of the magical store, where ancient tomes, kindly conversations, and recommendations come together. Pagans and mystics of the western traditions historically don’t have churches or congregations. We’ve found one another in these book-lined spaces. It’s from the occult bookseller that we’ve received our guidance for reading; we’ve got our introductions to the local coven or the address of the local magical lodge.

In my own city of London, the ancestor booksellers are many and indeed illustrious. John Watkins, a friend of occultist Helen Blavatsky, set up his bookshop on Charing Cross Road in the early 1890s. His occultist customers used his shop as a meeting place and pressed him into publishing some of their work. Among them were members of the Golden Dawn, including WB Yeats and MacGregor Mathers and, of course, Aleister Crowley. Eventually Watkins’ son Geoffrey took over for his father. Carl Jung was a friend. Aldous Huxley was also known to be a bookshop regular. The famous poet Kathleen Raine wrote this of the son who inherited the bookseller mantle:

He welcomed his customers as his guests, assuming that we were seekers for wisdom, and meeting each of us at the level of our learning (or our ignorance) as he was well able to do. He seemed always to have time to listen.

The Atlantis Bookshop

The Atlantis Bookshop [Courtesy Photo]

London’s Atlantis Bookshop was founded in 1922 by Michael Houghton, a Jewish immigrant with a passion for the mysteries and poetry, and who reputedly held ceremonies in the basement room of his shop on Museum Street. Caroline Wise, who owned the shop through the 1990s, related to me that, during the second world war, Houghton took in refugee Jewish children who had been smuggled out of Nazi Europe. Houghton’s customers included Gerald Gardner, for whom he kindly published his book on Wicca – which apparently took a while to sell.

Atlantis and Watkins are both still flourishing in London. We at Treadwells, having opened in 2003, are the new kids on the block. We are honoured to have such predecessors as those booksellers. This is my town, these are my ancestors of place. I owe them honour for their help in cultivating the traditions of my spiritual vocation and my bookselling profession.

The young Christina visited the occult bookshops of London for the first time in early 1990, when still fresh off the overnight train from Northern Scotland. The noticeboards listed groups, meetings, conferences. These scrappy bits of paper and cards were a key to the places I would find real witches, real magicians. The booksellers at these shops looked knowledgeable and kindly, but I was always too daunted to strike up a conversation. In those days I was embarrassed to be the new kid. So I hid behind the books as I’d done since childhood, silently bringing my purchases to the check out and equally silently scribbling down the phone numbers and addresses of the contacts on the community board  I’ve learned that my story is a common one for that era.


Magickal Childe [Public Domain]

This summer I traveled to New York City and looked along the streets for the site of the old Magickal Childe, where so many gathered in the seventies and eighties, to find one another, find adventure and misadventure, and to connect for magic, for withcraft, and for personal explorations. Here, gay men met up and gave birth to a men’s initiatory tradition of witchcraft known as the Minoan Brotherhood. Here teenagers came through the doors to nervously browse and buy their first black-covered paperbacks – Michael Bertiaux’s Voudon Gnostic Workbook or Doreen Valiente’s ABC of Wicca. And although the bookshop’s doors closed years ago, its precedent continues to inspire those of us who run esoteric bookshops today.

When I travel around America or around the UK, I can’t help but pop into every small city’s esoteric shop. Whether it’s Nottingham or Norwich or Albany, I have to go in. Usually I end up having a chat with the owner, who is commonly the friendly person behind the cash register. We talk about “how business is” and about the effect of the internet on bookstores. But, most of all, we talk about our spiritual calling – to have an open door for the community of Pagans, magicians and seekers in the place where we live. It’s a hard life. We commiserate with one another, but all our conversations come back to the fact that we feel we have to do it.

In our conversations, we reminisce about the good old days, remembering those who did it before us. And, though we don’t always say it to one another, I get the feeling that we all look to the ancestors of the occult bookshop tradition for strength when we don’t know how we’re going to make the rent this month. They give us patience when obstreperous occultists lecture us on what we’ve known for years. They hover as benign presences over our book launches and watch over us from the upper corners of the dusty book cases.


[Courtesy of Treadwell’s]

And so, as I unlock the door of my own shop this morning, this prayer is in my mind:

Bless us, ancestors of the occult bookshops, and we in turn bless you and thank you for all you did in your lifetimes. We try to do you proud, and stand in your shoes as best we can. May the bookshop continue to be the circle between the worlds, a meeting place of joy and peace and communion.

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Cherry Hill SeminaryLearning institution Cherry Hill Seminary, which provides training to Pagan clergy, has announced that they will be offering three scholarships to their 2014 Summer Intensive this July in Missouri. Quote: “Thanks to the generous contributions of many individuals last year to our new endowment fund, Cherry Hill Seminary is offering three scholarships to this year’s summer intensive, Entering the Sacred Grove, July 10-13, in Butler, Missouri. Scholarships are for the registration fee (which covers lunches at the event) and for tuition in the master’s class component (not required).  Individuals who receive a scholarship are responsible for their own travel and accommodations. Entering the Sacred Grove will be an unusual opportunity to meet academic leadership as attendees will include Academic Dean Wendy Griffin, Dean of Students Candace Kant, and two department chairs, Bob Patrick and David Oringderff. In addition, the retreat will be the occasion of a wonderful event, the graduation of Carol Kirk, who has just earned her Master of Divinity!” For more information on applying, write to:

tara_morgana_slide_1June 27th at Treadwell’s in London will see a launch party for poet Paul Holman and photographer Paul Lambert’s new book “Tara Morgana,” published by Scarlet Imprint. Quote: “Tara Morgana is a work of pure magical writing. The title comes from the fusion of the Tibetan devi with Morgan Le Fay who is pursued as a mirage throughout this haunting text. Part magical diary, part dreamscape, part Situationist dérive through the landscape, Tara Morgana is an enigmatic record of ritual practice from the poet, whose work has been described as: indefinable … laconic, occultist, and attached to the line of revolutionary and subversive yearnings. This is not a book about magic, rather, it is a magical book. Contemplation of the work reveals a wealth of hidden treasures, or as Holman says: each dreamed text is a terma in the mind. Paul Holman is a lucid poet whose writing, with its concise yet elusive energy, takes us down into the tunnels, ghosts broken urban spaces where decay is overwritten with the ingress of the wild. He encounters denizens of the underworld, the magical subculture and down and outs. It is a work of echoes and memories whose reflections coalesce in dreams that can be recovered and manifest in the present.” The standard edition of the book will be released on June 2nd, paperback and digital editions are forthcoming.

Patrick McCollum at UNAs previously reported here at The Wild Hunt, Pagan activist and chaplain Patrick McCollum recently went to the United Nations to participate in an interfaith meeting centered on ending nuclear proliferation. Here’s a brief excerpt from the report on the event McCollum sent us: “This is the first of a series of meetings to strategize and develop a new treaty to end current nuclear proliferation and I will attend all future meetings going forward. Nuclear disarmament will now be an additional official subsection of the mission of the Patrick McCollum Foundation and I will be partnering with several other NGOs and peace builders on this […] I made several important high level connections during and after the meeting and received several other important invitations. I take the responsibility of interacting in these venues very seriously and do my best to represent my community with dignity and honor. This is literally where the rubber hits the road on global issues and the future of humanity is often decided here. I am so privileged to have a voice here and to offer us a place at the table.” You can read the statement he gave at the UN, here. More on this, and Rev. McCollum’s report, soon.

In Other Pagan Community News:

  • On June 1st Fulgur Esoterica will announce the launch of a multimedia art project taking place over a six month period which will explore the concept of the third mind through prolonged dream recordings, online shares and Icelandic folklore. The project, entitled: “The Dreaming Project: Two Artists, Twenty –six Sigils” features artists Jesse Bransford (NYU) and Max Razdow who will attempt to attune their dreams by meditating separately on Icelandic symbols known as magical staves. You can read the whole press release for this project, here. We will be updating you on this project as it progresses.


  • The new issue of Witches & Pagans Magazine, featuring Diana Paxson on the cover, shipped physical copies of the magazine on Monday, and is also now available via digital download. Quote: “This issue guest-stars a pair of notable Pagan writers. In ‘A Priestess for All Seasons’ we sit down with loremistress, fantasy author, seeress and Pagan/Heathen community leader Diana L. Paxson. Diana is best-known for her work on the ‘Avalon’ series (launched by Marion Zimmer Bradley) but has more than thirty novels and non-fiction books to her credit. Discover what inspires her amazing imagination in this exclusive interview. Western esoteric author Josephine McCarthy has been a working magician for over three decades; we discuss how magick arises from the power of the land spirits in ‘Visions from the North Gate.'”
  • Last week, we reported the news that Pagan elder and priestess Morning Glory Zell had passed away. Now, her husband Oberon Zell has posted a moving narrative of the funeral service. Quote: “Yesterday we laid Morning Glory’s body into the Earth, to rest in the bosom of Mother Gaea until she may return again in new flesh. I planted an apple tree over her loving heart, that someday her substance may return to us all as sweet nourishing fruit. It was a small private ceremony, attended by immediate family and about 30 of our closest family friends.”
  • Author, academic, feminist, and Goddess-worshipper Carol P. Christ is running for political office in Greece. Quote: “I live in Molivos and I am a candidate for the Regional Council of the North Aegean in Lesbos with the Green Wind because I love nature and the traditional way of life in the islands. I believe that we must appreciate and protect what we have, rather than destroy it.”
  • Aline O’Brien (aka M. Macha NightMare) has posted a report of Pagan participation in the Marin Interfaith Council Annual Prayer Breakfast. Quote: “What’s a Witch to do when her interfaith council’s 15th Annual Interfaith Prayer Breakfast, which occurs on the first Thursday in May, falls on Beltane? Well, she sings up the Sun with the Berkeley Morris Dancers at dawn, then hustles across the bridge to Tiburon with her Wiccan (Gardnerian, to be specific) interfaith colleague, Don Frew, to rendezvous with Matt Whealton, a practitioner of Kemetic religion from the Temple of Ra, at his first foray into interfaith activities.” 

That’s all I have for right now, have a great day!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Modrzyk MemoriesOn February 5th, it was reported that Stanley Modrzyk (1945 – 2014), founder & High Priest of the first Temple of the Craft of W.I.C.A., had passed away. Modrzyk was the author of two books on Wiccan practice, and was one of the founding members of the Midwest Pagan Council and of the Pan Pagan Festival, one of the first and oldest running festivals in the Midwest United States from which Pagan Spirit Gathering and Chrysalis Moon got their start. A longtime activist for his faith in the Midwest, Stanley made many media appearances, and organized to stop faux-witch-burnings during Halloween celebrations in the Chicago area. A wake will be held on Feb. 14th from 2-8pm at Joseph Nosek and Sons Funeral Home, 6716 W. 16th Street in Berwyn, IL. In lieu of flowers, the family is asking that people donate to JDRF -Junior Diabetic Research Fund or The Chicago Lighthouse. The family is asking those that cannot make the wake to light a candle for him on Friday, Feb. 14th at 7pm. Stanley Modrzyk is survived by his wife, Dorothy, and daughter, Lizzy, who are both active within the Craft. Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary and Pagan Spirit Gathering said that she is “thankful for his many positive contributions to the Craft & Paganism.” What is remembered, lives.

1484086_253554558146286_1250339820_nA new Pagan organization has formed, one dedicated to supporting infrastructure and developing small Pagan institutions. Quote: “Announcing the Pantheon Foundation: building 21st Century Pagan infrastructure. We are a California non-profit religious corporation applying for 501(c)(3) status with the IRS. Our mission is to provide IRS group exemptions for Pagan organizations through fiscal sponsorship, develop Pagan ministry, study the history, promote the culture, and advance the social welfare of Pagans and the Pagan community.” Pantheon Foundation will be holding a reception at PantheaCon 2014 this weekend, Saturday, 9pm, in Suite 1060. One of its main functions, providing fiscal sponsorship, will directly benefit The Wild Hunt, and once final paperwork is done, donations to this site will be tax-deductible. Co-founder Sam Webster says that, quote, “we have finally built a Pagan religious non-profit organization to serve the many needs of our community and provide legal coverage for our small organizations.” More announcements will be forthcoming, for those who can’t be at PantheaCon.

polytheist leadership conferenceLast week I mentioned that a proposed Polytheist Leadership Conference was moving forward, now, co-organizer Galina Krasskova elaborates further on plans at the Witches & Pagans Magazine site. Quote: “The Polytheist Leadership Conference will take place Friday, July 11th through Sunday, July 13th – though we’ve made arrangements so that you can get the block room rate if you want to come in earlier on Thursday. We’ll begin on Friday at 3:00pm with an opening prayer to our collective dead and polytheist predecessors and then have a lecture and roundtable discussion with the rest of the evening devoted to socializing and networking. We’ll start at 10:00am on Saturday with a full day of workshops, lectures and roundtable discussions ending at 8:00pm. There’ll be half hour breaks between each session and an extended lunch and dinner. Sunday begins at 10:00am and has two sessions with a social lunch and then a closing ceremony at 3:00pm.” An official website is now up so attendees can register. You can also find further details there about the conference.

In Other Pagan Community News:

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

Circle Magazine

Circle Magazine

The latest issue of Circle Magazine (#115) is now at the printers, and available for order at the Circle Sanctuary store. Quote: “This issue features inspiration to honor our families, from birth, through childhood to departed ancestors. Also in this issue, connect with the season with rituals, crafts and songs for the Solstice, Yule and the New Year!” Lady Liberty League, Circle Sanctuary’s religious freedom advocacy arm, also notes that there are many items in this issue of interest to their mission. Quote: “Lots for Lady Liberty League fans in the new issue of Circle Magazine, shipping to subscribers and online now! Get the final report on all the collaborative work LLL did to address religious violence on Facebook & read the LLL End-of-Year Statement from LLL Case Manager, Minerva Thalia. ALSO look for ‘Advocating for Pagan Children in the Public School System’ by public school teacher Aurora Lightbringer, and read her ‘6 Key Strategies to Address Religious Discrimination in Schools.’ You won’t want to miss this on!” So check it out!

cropped-PconBanner13aHey there PantheaCon watchers! The largest indoor Pagan conference in the United States has just released its 2014 programming schedule, featuring a dizzying array of talks, panels, and workshops. Quote: “The PantheaCon 2014 schedule is now available, and we are again offering you two ways to view it!  First, you can click here to see the list of presenters and events by room.  If you would like to see presenter biographies and event descriptions, you can click here to access our improved Personal Schedule tool – it also allows you to to customize your schedule by selecting only those events that you want to attend. You will need a valid email address to use this tool.  Email programming(at) if you experience any issues.” Some early highlights: the band Woodland playing at PantheaCon for the first time ever, a formal panel on privilege within modern Paganism moderated by T. Thorn Coyle, a panel discussion on sacrifice hosted by Coru Cathubodua, Lupercalia with Ekklesia Antinoou, and much, much, much, more! So check it out, and keep in mind that this schedule could change depending on additions or changes in attendance. Also, schedules for hospitality suites aren’t posted yet, so that’s another aspect to keep an eye out for.

1425710_10201953836920156_1475050013_nWitches of Michigan and the Michigan-Midwest Witches Ball have issued a statement saying they would being taking over the Tempest Smith Foundation’s scholarship program, after it was publicly announced that the advocacy organization would be closing down. Quote: “As everyone may/or may not know, Tempest Smith Foundation is closing their doors very soon. We (Witches of Michigan and Witches Ball) have joined forces to continue with TSF’s scholarship program. Met with the lawyer yesterday, to form a Non Profit and apply for 501c3 by the end of the year this will have been accomplished. I like to thank those who donated money to the cause, we raised enough for the 501c3, and generous donations from WOM and MWB paid for creation of the Non-profit. Starting on 1/1/14 we will accepting applications for pagan high school seniors for $500 scholarship.” The new scholarship will be called the Michigan Pagan Scholarship, and the nascent organization has started a group on Facebook. The Tempest Smith Foundation has been “a voice for diversity tolerance in its Michigan community and an advocate of anti-bullying campaigns,” and it looks like Michigan Pagans are going to make sure its legacy lives on.  We will report more on this story as it develops.

In Other Pagan Community News:

Adela Leibowitz "Isis and the goat-fish of Ea (Enki)" 2012

Adela Leibowitz “Isis and the goat-fish of Ea (Enki)” 2012

  • Esoteric artist Adela Leibowitz has opened a new show this month at hpgrp Gallery in New York, with pieces focusing on Mesopotamian and Egyptian Mythology. Quote: “Unlike earlier series such as Fairytales of the Macabre (2004) and The Cassandra Prophesies, (2006), which focused on Western tales, Leibowitz turns to Eastern religions and mythologies in “Mesopotamian and Egyptian Mythology.” In this exhibition, she continues her explorations by re-animating gods and goddesses, chaos demons, sages, protective deities and mythical hybrids. She places them in lush, tropical landscapes that represent a primal world where humans, animals and nature co-exist together in harmony. In essence, she creates utopias.” Also, check out the Phantasmaphile write-up. The show runs through December 21st.
  • Just a reminder that the New Alexandrian Library’s short crowd-funding initiative to continue the ongoing construction on their future physical space in Delaware has less than a week to go. So if libraries run by Pagan and esoteric interests is something you value, be sure to visit their IndieGoGo page and add your support. For all of my coverage of the New Alexandrian Library, click here.
  • In other crowd-funding news, as I mentioned on Monday, Starhawk has launched an IndieGoGo campaign to fund diversity scholarships for Earth Activist Trainings. Quote: “A small investment in Earth Activist Training has a huge ripple effect. Any amount you can donate will help diversify the environmental justice movement, bring new perspectives and insights into the permaculture movement, and give activists and community leaders the tools they need to build that beautiful world of the future we know is possible!”
  • Treadwell’s in London is hosting a one-person play about artist and occultist Austin Osman Spare on November 30th. Quote: “Set in the artist’s studio at the Elephant and Castle on the night  of a Blitz bombing, it shows Spare growing old in poverty, yet fiercely committed to his vision. In the course of the night, a rogue sigil unleashes unpredictable consequences. This ‘play conceived as an act of magic’, performed by the author, is both an homage to AOS and a playful exploration of Constable’s own esoteric work to ‘set us free from ourselves.’ John Constable is a poet, playwright and magical practitioner best-known for The Southwark Mysteries, and for his acclaimed stage adaptation of Gormenghast.”
  • I’m always a big fan of crowd-funded tarot and oracle decks, and the Kickstarter for the Tarot of Delphi looks rather nice. Quote: “Curated with fine art from the late 1830s to the early 1910s, the Tarot of Delphi is like a mini-museum. You can wander through this captivating deck – exploring the imagery, absorbing the colors and light, envisioning the lives depicted – and imagine yourself within its mythic narrative.”

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

6a00d83454ed4169e201901ee8f344970b-500wiThe Occult Humanities Conference: Contemporary Art and Scholarship on the Esoteric Traditions will be taking place October 18th-20th in New York City, hosted by Hosted by Phantasmaphile, Observatory and the NYU Steinhardt Department of Art and Art Professions. Quote:  “The conference will present a wide array of voices active in the cultural landscape who are specifically addressing the occult tradition through research, scholarship and artistic practice […] The presenters at the OHC represent a rich and expanding community of international artists and academics from multiple disciplines across the humanities who share an exuberance and excitement for how the occult traditions interface with their fields of study as well as the culture at large. The small scale of this conference (approximately 100 attendees) will give ticket holders an intimate look at the presenters and their views.” Participants include Robert Ansell of Fulgur Esoterica, Pam Grossman of Phantasmaphile fameIthell Colquhoun expert Dr. Amy Hale, and author Gary Lachman, among others. If I had the budget for it, I’d be there in a heartbeat! If you’re in New York, you should check it out!

wp27cover1bIssue of #27 of Witches & Pagans Magazine is scheduled to be released on October 15th, and features an interview with Teo Bishop, conducted by T. Thorn Coyle. Quote: “This issue guest-stars a triplet of fascinating Pagan notables. Paranormal and detective novelist Alex Bledsoe sold his first magickal “Lady Firefly” story to PanGaia in 1998. Catch up with his journey in this conversation with Deborah Blake; then listen in as the inimitable T. Thorn Coyle talks with Pagan blogger, mystic, Druid and musician (aka Matt Morris) Teo Bishop; and visit with Renaissance woman, writer, and community leader Tish Owen.” Meanwhile, the rest of the issue is water-themed. Quote: “What would it be like to experience water viscerally? Susan Harper teaches us to become conscious of the sacral nature of this ubiquitous element in her article ‘Sensing Water.’ Loremaster P. Sufenas Virius Lupus writes about the ability of water ­ and even of drowning ­ to assist in the apotheosis of humans in his fascinating look at classical Greek and Roman paganism ‘Deification by Drowning.’ Leni Hester introduces us to the Lady of Fresh Water, Ochun, in ‘No One is an Enemy to Water.'” You can pre-order the issue, here.

The Warrior's CallLast week I reported on an upcoming Pagan-led public ritual in the UK to protect the land near Glastonbury Tor from the practice of “fracking” (hydraulic fracturing to extract oil an gas from the earth). Since then, more Pagan leaders have stepped forward to weigh in on the topic. Author and activist Starhawk said it was “almost unbelievable” that the UK government “would threaten the purity of Chalice Well in Glastonbury, a site sacred to both Pagans and Christians!” So far, over 1000 people have committed to attending the ritual, with many more promising energetic work in solidarity. In addition, Druid leader John Michael Greer writes at length about the false promise, and dangerous effect of the practice. Quote: “The increasingly frantic cheerleading being devoted to the fracking industry these days is simply one more delay in the process of coming to grips with the real crisis of our time—the need to decouple as much as possible of industrial society from its current dependence on fossil fuels.” Could fracking become a new rallying point for Pagans drawn to environmental activism? We’ll keep you posted as this issue develops.

In Other Pagan Community News: 

  • “Tales of Albion,” an 8-part web-based film series follow-up to the Pagan film “The Spirit of Albion,” has posted several production pictures taken over the Summer. Quote: “We are now scheduling like crazy for the next few shoots which will see us tackle a legendary outlaw and the once and future king. We will travel to an 11th Century monastery, the Bronze Age and even Neolithic caves. We will see two world wars, the 95thRifles and a priest with writer’s block! It’s going to be quite a ride…”
  • The Open Hearth Foundation in Washington DC has a library. Here it is in six seconds.
  • October 11-14th will be Twilight Covening, a yearly event held by the EarthSpirit Community. Quote: “Twilight Covening is a three-day institute of Earth spirituality held within a continual three-day ritual. It is a time for exploring ways to deepen Earth-centered spiritual practice and a time to develop our collective wisdom in a shared sacred space as we move into the dark time of the year.”
  • Friday, September 20th will see the launch party for Abraxas Issue Four, at Treadwells in London. Quote: “A night of partying,  40 minute session of speeches, short presentations and a few words from each of the contributors who can join us.  When you’ve finished looking at the art on the walls we will serenade you wtih three short readings. Think of it as a salon for magic and the imagination. Join us, meet the contributors, and revel in the delight of magic and the imagination.”
  • The Delmarva Pagan Pride Festival in Delaware happened yesterday. They had symphonic gothic metal band Cassandra Syndrome play, which you have to admit is pretty hard-core for a Pagan Pride Day event.

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

with_love_from_salemA documentary focusing on the Temple of Nine Wells, and the lives of Richard and Gypsy Ravish, entitled “With Love From Salem,” has announced that they’ve nearly completed the project. Quote: “I had the privilege of seeing some footage of this documentary, currently nearing completion, and to say it is phenomenal is an understatement. A beautiful, evocative and magical film – not to mention visually and emotionally stunning. Get ready to see something amazing.” Richard Ravish was one of the original “Witches of Salem,” and passed away in 2012 at the age of 59. Amy “Gypsy” Ravish is a popular Pagan singer-songwriter known for her albums “Enchantress” and “Spirit Nation.” I’m very much looking forward to a new Pagan-centered documentary, and will update you here once there’s screening/release information.

Erynn Rowan Laurie

Erynn Rowan Laurie

As mentioned previously here, Erynn Rowan Laurie, author of “A Circle of Stones,” recently won for best poetry collection at the Bisexual Book Awards (photos of the ceremony here). On her return, she announced at her official Facebook page that she’s considering a move to Italy, motivated in part by recent health issues. Quote: “As with so many other things in my life, I realized I could either let circumstance defeat me, or I could try to work it so that I could turn it into something interesting. If I’m going to be robbed of my ability to drive, why not have an adventure in a place where walking is normal? It won’t mean that nobody will ever see me again. The internet still exists, after all. I’m very likely to try to fly back to the US for PantheaCon every year, and try to visit Seattle once a year as well.” We here at The Wild Hunt wish Erynn all the best no matter where she goes, and any nation she moves to will be all the richer for her presence. Good luck! Oh, and speaking of the Bisexual Book Awards, they can apparently get you stopped at the Canadian border and held for several hours.

Christina Oakley Harrington

Christina Oakley Harrington

Acclaimed London esoteric book store Treadwells has announced the launch of a brand-new, more robust, website. Included is an extensive resources section headed by Treadwells founder, Christina Oakley Harrington. For example, individuals new to Paganism can find several introductory essays about Paganism in general, and about Paganism in the UK in particular. Quote: “The pages below are designed to be clear, direct and authoritative. The pages on  groups and events direct you to the more established resources, though there are many more that can be found in local communities.” Harrington notes that “if you feel like lookng round the site, it’s got lots of other sections, too. We’ve been working hard on it for ages and hope you all find it useful.” Treadwell’s recently held a number of talks and events in conjunction with the I:MAGE esoteric arts exhibition reported on recently at The Wild Hunt.

Sabina Magliocco at the Conference on Current Pagan Studies. (Photo: Tony Mierzwicki)

Sabina Magliocco

Chas Clifton reports that Dr. Sabina Magliocco, Professor of Anthropology at California State University, Northridge, and author of “Witching Culture: Folklore and Neo-Paganism in America” is launching a new research project on individual’s spiritual relationship with animals. Quote: “The purpose of this study is to understand how we imagine our relationship to animals, how we incorporate animals into our spiritual or religious beliefs, and how this may motivate our actions in the everyday world.” You can take the survey, here. At the survey page Magliocco elaborates on benefits of the study: “This research could shed light on how people come to imagine themselves as part of an interconnected community that includes domestic and wild animals, and develop feelings that lead them to want to protect, defend and care for both domestic and wild animals. It may also reveal areas in which individuals diverge from the theological teachings of their religion as a result of their personal experiences with animals. Findings could be useful in developing educational programs for children and young people that foster sustainability.” Again, the survey link.

pagan_history_projectThe Pagan History Project (PHP) initiated with a soft launch this week on Facebook, with a full website to follow soon. An oral history project created to “collect, store, share and preserve the history of the American Pagan Movement,” co-founder Murtagh AnDoile said the scope of the project would be broad. Quote: “We are using “Pagan” in its broadest sense, encompassing: Witchcraft , Traditional and other, Wicca, Heathenry, Druidry, various Reconstructionisms, Magical Lodges, etc. All the groups and traditions and paths that make up the American Occult/Magical/Pagan movement from the early days ( the 1930s, 40’s 50’s…) to present. We are focusing on everything and everyone pre-1995 at this time, due to our aging population.” Initial interviews have already been conducted, and an informational packet instructing those interested on how to participate in their local communities and festivals will be released soon. Wild Hunt staffer Rynn Fox has been following the development of this project, and will be filing a report soon.

In Other Community News: 

Temple of Witchcraft at Boston Pride.

Temple of Witchcraft at Boston Pride.

  • I love seeing pictures of Pagan organizations marching in LGBTQ Pride parades, so be sure to check out the Temple of Witchcraft’s Facebook page, where they’ve posted several photos of their involvement with the Boston Pride Parade. Quote from ToW co-founder Steve Kenson: “Thank you to all who came out to march and represent for the pagans in Saturday’s Boston GLBT Pride parade and to those who cheered us on! The gods rewarded us with a clear and warm day after a grey and wet morning. Many thanks and blessings!”
  • As was indirectly mentioned in my installment of Pagan Voices earlier this week, the Patheos Pagan Channel has launched a new group interfaith blog entitled “Wild Garden: Pagans in the Growing Interfaith Landscape.” Quote: “Interfaith involvement looks much like a wild garden. A tangle of contradictions, surprises, delights and sometimes disappointments, one must walk carefully. But the risk is rewarded richly, often in ways one could never have seen coming.” Good luck on the new blog! 
  • Also at Patheos, the Pagan Families blog interviews Tara “Masery” Miller about the process of “adopting while Pagan.” Quote: “The Missouri Family and Children’s Services, a government agency, intention to adopt form illegally asked what our religion was. Just as I suspected. I was aware it was illegal because my atheist friend had sent me plenty of references on religion and adoption. Well, instead of blatantly saying I’m Pagan and my husband’s a mage, I said we are spiritual and I belong to the Unitarian Universalist Church! And sometimes we attend a Methodist Church. Which is true. My mother is a lay minister!” That quote is from part two of the interview, here.
  • The Summer Solstice is coming up, and Llewellyn is holding a Twitter party to celebrate! Quote: “The beginning of June marks shorts days, grill days, and summer hours for our luckly Llewellyn employees–but it’s not very fair that you don’t get to participate, is it? So we want you to join us in a summer celebration! We are hosting our second annual Solstice Twitter party! […] Use the hashtag #moonchat in your party tweets. We’ll tweet the questions, you’ll tweet the answers, and we’ll chat!” There are going to be prize giveaways for participants, so if you’re stuck in an office that day, why not? 
  • In a final note for all our Trad-Wiccan friends out there (and you know who you are), June 13th is Geraldmas! The celebration of Gerald Gardner, the father of modern religious Witchcraft (born June 13th, 1884). I think it’s a great idea to have a day where BTW groups do a day of outreach and socializing. Are you having a Geraldmas celebration in your area this year? 

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!