Archives For Paris

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Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson [Photo Credit: Haukurth (Own work), CC lic. Wikimedia]

As the sun’s light was blocked by the moon’s travel, members of Iceland’s Ásatrúarfélagið broke ground for their new temple in Reykjavík. The ceremony was the next major step in a quest that began in 2006. Columnist Eric Scott detailed the history and plans for this temple in a January article “Temple on the HIll,” interviewing both the architect and organization’s leader, Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson.

The Icelandic Review described the Friday event, saying: “The ceremony began at 08.38, at the start of the eclipse, whereby the boundaries were ceremonially marked out, candles lit in each corner, and local landmarks honored. When the darkness was at its height, at 09.37, a fire was lit in what will be the center of the chapel.”  The Norse Mythology Blog posted a photo from the actual ceremony on its Facebook page and on its Twitter account.

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A Pagan mother living in Paris has set herself a lofty goal of creating a new Pagan cafe in the city. Krynn Aïlhenya, a French Pagan and Parisan local, said that she’s very active in trying to develop and grow France’s Pagan community. On her new crowd sourcing campaign, she said, “Un espace convivial pour les païen(ne)s de toutes traditions, où discuter autour d’une pinte.” [“A welcoming space for all pagans of all traditions, where they come and talk over a pint.”]

Aïlhenya said that she and the other organizers hope that the space expands beyond that one simple description. Once in full operation, the Pagan cafe would also serve as a “a library, an esoteric shop and could host events like Pagan celebrations, exhibitions, and conferences.” Provided in both English and French, the IndieGoGo description notes that they hope to open by the end of 2015 in the very center of Paris.

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HUAR Logo

On March 18, a gunman opened fired in Mesa, Arizona killing one person and wounding five others. The suspect, Ryan Giroux, was quickly taken into custody. It was not long before the media discovered that Giroux’s was connected to the Hammerskins White Supremacist group. Unfortunately, this detail was made more pronounced by the very large tattoo on the man’s chin – the Hammer of Thor.

After learning of shooting, HUAR quickly offered a statement in reaction. It reads in part, “This individual and his associates are notorious for corrupting many aspects of Heathen practice for advancing their white nationalist agenda by grossly dishonorable means including, most shamefully, the hallowed Hammer of Thor … We, the members of Heathens United Against Racism, denounce Giroux, his associates, and any others who assisted him in perpetrating his terrible actions.” Several other Heathens and groups have issued similar statements, such as Alyxander Folmer. We will be continue to follow this story.

In Other News … Interviews and more Interviews

  • On March 8, The Goddess Diaries Radio interviewed Z. Budapest. In the 40 minute interview, “Z shared her story of being prosecuted/persecuted for practicing her craft in the“last witch trial” in America. Her courage to stand in her truth paved the way for woman to freely practice Goddess Spirituality in our country today.”
  • In conjunction with Paganicon, Lupa Greenwolf is interviewed by PNC-Minnesota writer Nels Linde. Greenwolf talks about her background, her practice and her work on the new Tarot deck. She said, “I have a very deep love of learning about nature, to include learning through books and documentaries.
  • Linde also published another interview done in conjunction with Paganicon. In this article, he speaks with Rev. Selena Fox about everything from her life passages workshop, to political activism, and to the future of Circle Sanctuary. When talking about transferring responsibility to younger people, Fox said, “We need to do more of this. We not only need to do education, but need to inspire and guide action. We need to find ways to take responsibility as individuals, as households, and as communities to work together for a healthier, sustainable world with equality, liberty, and justice for all.
  • ACTION’s 2015 Ostara edition is available. In its 54 pages, Christopher Blackwell includes interviews with Black Witch, Allison Leigh Lilly, Lee Davies, David Parry, Linda Sever, Lorna Smithers, and Stephen Cole.
  • Finally, the Atlantis Bookshop in London celebrated its 93rd Birthday. As they posted, the “beastly” celebration included tea, cakes and “cheeky cocktails.” Now owned by Geraldine Beskin, Atlantis was founded in 1922 by Michael Houghton. It has been one of the cornerstones in London’s Occult and Witchcraft community for nearly a century. Happy Birthday to Atlantis!

That is it for now. Have a great day.

Update 3/23/15 2:45pm: We originally stated that the Paris cafe was to be the first in the city. However, we recently were informed otherwise and have corrected the text. 

One of the most obvious legacies our modern world holds from its pre-Christian “pagan” past are the visual arts. There wouldn’t have been a Renaissance without the art and writings of the Classical world, and the pagan-humanist hybrid that began there has been an integral part of the fine arts ever since. Pagan symbolism is such an ingrained part of art’s language, that it can become unconscious, at least until it becomes politicized. However, a growing trend within the world of fine art is making the connections between art, Paganism, and the occult, explicit. I recently mentioned the “Sigils and Signs” show in Brooklyn, the Manhattanhenge ritual performance art piece, and the “Collective Tarot” project, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. For example, the photographer Katarzyna Majak recently opened a show at the Porter Contemporary gallery in New York entitled “Women of Power,” a body of work that “explores the power of women as she searches for female wisdom and plurality of spiritual paths hidden within monoreligious Polish society.”

Julia, An Independent Witch; Enenna, Wiccan Coven Leader; Maria Ela, Shaman Wise Women Council (Katarzyna Majak)

Julia, An Independent Witch; Enenna, Wiccan Coven Leader; Maria Ela, Shaman Wise Women Council (Katarzyna Majak)

“The women of wisdom, healers, enchanters, visionaries and spiritual leaders depicted in Majak’s vibrant photographs often facing discrimination, have taken great risk in being photographed. This is the first time many of them owned their power publicly. Majak’s journey with the Women of Power began when one of them accompanied her in a ritual to say ‘good-bye’ to her wedding dress, and the journey continued from woman to woman as the artist became fascinated with their alternative wisdoms on female power.”

Another New York space, the Jonathan LeVine Gallery, recently wrapped up a solo exhibition by Nicola Verlato, who tells the Huffington Post that his work illustrates a conflict between monotheism and polytheism.

"If" by Nicola Verlato (from the "How the West was Won" show).

"If" by Nicola Verlato (from the "How the West was Won" show).

“Polytheism survives in the western world through pop culture, and in several countries like India, which are becoming more prominent in the modern world, and are largely polytheistic. In our overwhelmingly monotheistic culture this task has been relegated to the field of entertainment; pop culture has now essentially taken on the task of creating the mythologies of our time. There are several artists today who are, more or less, consciously working on mythologies, as painters and sculptors. They work mostly out of Los Angeles, and are usually listed under the definition of Pop surrealists. I think our work may possibly be considered a contribution towards a cultural shift.”

Meanwhile, the Musee du Quai Branly in Paris showcases “The Masters of Disorder,” art that depicts figures of disorder and chaos, and those individuals, shamans, medicine men, artists, and sorcerers, who negotiate with them. The exhibition mixes traditional tribal art with modern and contemporary pieces “to free what used to be labeled as tribal art from the limits of ethnology and judge it from a purely aesthetic angle.”

“The exhibition looks at the figures of the disorder, entered the pantheon of our beliefs and cultures, Dionysus Seth Typhon, and technicians, shamans and other intercessors here called “masters of disorder”, responsible for negotiations with the forces of chaos. In this constant compromise between turbulence and reason, rituals are the preferred mode of negotiation with the powers that govern human societies. Along with these sacred rituals, feasts, revelry, carnivals or festivals of fools seem to be the other way, profane, allowing the unleashing of transgressive impulses.”

It’s a provocative concept, one that places the idea of chaotic external forces, and the need for ritualized interactions with them, into the here-and-now, instead of in a fossilized past. It also places the modern artist into a pantheon of magic-workers and ritualists.

As I said earlier, these examples are simply a sampling of a phenomenon that is far larger, other examples are easy to come by, and there are new ones emerging on a regular basis. They collectively portray a process of re-enchantment, a new direction and purpose after what some called “the end of art” during the height of post-modern conceptualism. A new emphasis on the roles artists can play in our society, and the importance of art in exploring the liminal in our lives. It is a process that I think our community should be more actively engaged in. While we have been admirably embracing the poetic arts, plays and theater, crafts, and functional art, I think we could be doing more, collectively, to support the fine arts: painting, sculpture, photography, installation, in our community. Not simply because it would benefit Pagan visual artists, but because it would also help us connect with our own roots in the use of art as a means of magic and communication.