Archives For Pagan Fundraising Initiatives

We did it. On Friday morning, I awoke to the emails that told me that our Fall Funding Drive had raised its goal, and even surpassed it a little bit. That means this site is funded for another year, and we can pay our columnists and contributors in the process. It’s a principle that I think is very important in our community, one that I feel is necessary if we’re going to build professional-level media organizations within our diverse and broad-based movement. My ultimate hope is that our success here points towards others replicating it. Though it may seem counter-intuitive, I crave the emergence of a real Pagan news ecosystem, because it is only within such an ecosystem that a larger ethos of journalism and commentary can emerge.

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Sites like Pam Grossman’s Phantasmaphile, Sarah Veale’s Invocatio, Carl Neal’s Pent O’clock News, and the eponymous A Bad Witch’s Blog in the UK, along with seasoned journalistic campaigners like PNC-Minnesota, show that there are many topics and areas of focus that need coverage, that explore areas I can only skim the surface of. Commentary and debate, especially within a religious movement, is easy to come by, but for those conversations to progress, for us to move ourselves forward on any number of important (and contentious) issues requires basic informational reporting. Journalism is the launchpad of discourse, bother internally, and externally. Which is why other religions have devoted a lot of time and resources to journalistic vehicles that serve their own communities. To put it simply, journalism shapes how we interact with the world, and ultimately, how the world interacts with us.

So again, my deepest thanks to the individuals and groups who donated to make this happen. Not knowing how long it would take us to raise the needed money, I gave our site the full allotted amount of time, 45 days, which means the campaign will remain open for nearly a month to come. I’ll won’t plug the campaign any longer, but I will leave the links and side-banner up so that folks who haven’t had a chance to donate can still participate if they wish. Once the campaign officially ends I will enact all the “perks,” including the links. I will also remove all the links and underwriters who didn’t renew (once their year is up). So again, if you want to be a part of this campaign, please do so during this window so we can work on an orderly schedule. We will, of course, be open to organizational ads and underwriters throughout the year, and we thank the amazing groups and companies who have pledged their support in previous months.

Before I close out this post, I want to touch quickly on raising money within the Pagan community. Over the past few years, as the rise of crowdfunding sites made the process of raising money easier, many Pagan individuals and organizations have tried their hand at raising funds. Everything from libraries, to plays, to albums, to tarot decks. Some have been wildly successful, and others not so much so. Under the aegis of The Wild Hunt, I have run several funding campaigns now, and I’d like to share some brief “tips” that perhaps go outside the general advice given to those embarking on a crowdfunding campaign.

Hell Money, the kind burned at The Ghost Festival. Photo: randomwire (Creative Commons).

Money! Photo: randomwire (Creative Commons).

  • Expect a very small percentage of your followers/readers/members to donate. The Wild Hunt has a lot of readers, and a lot of traffic. Since leaving Patheos, my traffic has grown to a point where I’ve had to upgrade our hosting package, or else risk overage fees. On Facebook, we have over 16,000 “likes.” You would think, with a huge profile like that, raising $10,000 dollars would be a day’s work. A small amount from a tiny fraction of my readers. However, our campaign was successful because fewer than 300 groups and individuals decided to donate. Many of those donors gave above lower perk levels, and the last 10-15% came predominately from bigger donors. This is not to say that the $5 donations weren’t appreciated, they were, but they weren’t coming in large enough numbers to ensure a successful campaign. So when you plan a campaign, ask yourself, would it succeed if less than 10% of your readership/membership donated? If you are going to rely on small-dollar donations, will you have the stamina, donor perks, and engagement to reach them?
  • Utilize social media. Practically everyone is using social media these days, and you need to have an active social footprint if you’re going to engage with your broader readership. If you haven’t already, start building a Facebook page, and an official Twitter account. Use them, grow them, and once you do, stay engaged with them. You may not like Facebook, but ignoring it severely limits your ability to do outreach with millions of people. Also,  plan to spend money to make money. Social media these days is tweaked to make you pay to reach your full potential audience. Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and more, all have pay options that will bring you more “eyeballs” to your campaign pitch. If you’re looking to raise a lot of money, you need to reach past your core engaged readership, and to the folks who maybe only check in with you on a weekly or monthly basis.
  • Stay positive, always. I know that other campaign advice sites will tell you this, but I need to reiterate. Never, ever, ever, go negative on your readers. Don’t guilt them, don’t make them feel bad, don’t get snarky, or start to make asides about how folks are enjoying your product/content but aren’t supporting you. Don’t decide to publish your rant about Pagans who buy expensive wands but won’t support infrastructure/teachers/charity projects during your campaign. Take an attitude of gratitude. People are giving you money, their money, that they earned. Even if you only raise ten bucks, you thank whoever it was who gave it to you, stay positive, and redouble your efforts. Focus on what you do, focus on the positive impact that their money will bring. Again, don’t guilt people, because it doesn’t work. Running a campaign can be very stressful, and very tiring, you’re going to be tempted to complain. Don’t. Not ever.
  • Consistently announce your campaign, don’t feel guilty to ask for money. Many subcultural groups, and many religious communities, have some complex attitudes towards asking for money. As a consequence, many Pagans get bashful, they undersell their campaign, they feel weird about asking for money. Don’t. If you are providing a resource, or a service, there is no shame in asking for people to support it. You aren’t forcing them to donate, and if they support your project, they won’t mind if you ask. In fact, many of my donors thanked me for reminding them, as they hadn’t seen the previous announcements. People have stuff going on their lives, and sometimes it doesn’t revolve around what you’re doing. So don’t be afraid to be consistent. Mention it every day, pitch it on your social networks. Do you think people stop listening to NPR because they have pledge drives? Most individuals understand that this is part and parcel of “free’ resources. The money has to come from somewhere.
  • Respect the power of your supporters, and ask them for their help. Fundraising is the art of causing change in conformity with your Will, or is that magick? Fundraising is a spell. One that you don’t cast alone. You mobilize the spell of fundraising by making it a group effort. By asking people you know to be your supporters to help you. Asking for help is powerful magic, and you can never tell what it will bring you. I have been blessed in the people and groups who have chosen to help me, and I try to pay that back by sharing and supporting other fundraising drives. In fact, while this fundraising drive was going on, I donated to two others. That reciprocity is important, because it builds community, and it is through community that you will find enough people to help you in your goal.
  • Finally, be reasonable in your expectations and your ask. The Wild Hunt asked for $10,000 dollars because that’s how much we really needed. I broke that number down, and told people directly what I was going to spend it on. When people give, they know they are paying our columnists, our hosting bill, and yes, they are putting a little bit of that into my pocket. I would not ask for $50,000 at this point, as I know the Internet is not a magic wishing machine, and the magic of fundraising only works if you’ve built the network to sustain that kind of ask. Conversely, don’t ask for too little, or else people won’t think it’s a big deal. There won’t be a sense of urgency in what you’re doing. Ask for enough, and think hard about what that means.

That’s it, and I hope that advice helps some folks considering a fundraiser in our community out. My deepest thanks to everyone who has donated, and to everyone who might still donate. I truly appreciate it, and I hope that this success will continue my goal to build The Wild Hunt into a media entity that perseveres, even beyond my own participation.

A bright and ongoing success story in the Pagan community has been the utilization of crowd-funding sites like IndieGoGo and Kickstarter to collectively raise funds for important projects. Starhawk raised over $75,000 dollars to help fund a pitch-reel in order get a feature film based on her book “The Fifth Sacred Thing” made. Peter Dybing helped raise $30,000 dollars for Doctors Without Borders in the wake of the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami. Pagan singer-songwriter SJ Tucker was amazed when a Kickstarter campaign for Tricky Pixie’s European tour more than doubled their initial goal in a matter of hours (and kept on growing). In addition, several smaller initiatives have managed to collectively raise thousands for Pagan projects: The readers of The Wild Hunt funded the proposed budget of this site for a year, Chicago-based Pagan/magical performance troupe Terra Mysterium raised funds for their new show “The Alembic,”and the Goddess community funded a documentary film in honor of Merlin Stone.

Crowdfunding sites allow an easy mechanism for fundraising in communities that may have social networks and organizations, but not the robust money-raising infrastructure of already-established mainstream institutions. This is a place modern Paganism is in today, and more and more of us are turning to these sites as a solution to our “money problem.” There are hundreds of thousands of Pagans out there, millions around the world, and they desire to see our projects and initiatives advance just as much as any other faith community. So here are some Pagan Fundraising Initiatives that you might want to contribute to.

Days Left in Parliament Fundraiser: There are only four days left in an urgent campaign to save the Parliament of the World’s Religions as it faces an unexpected one-time sudden financial crisis. I’ve written about this campaign before, and why Pagans should be invested in it, but now the deadline is looming and Pagan supporters are rallying to make sure this interfaith resource survives.

“We have 4 days left. Over the last two weeks, thanks to the generosity of many of you, the global Pagan community has raised $13,500 to help carry the Council for the Parliament of the World’s Religions (CPWR) into the future and save it from immediate closure! For more than 20 years, the Parliament has welcomed and supported the global Pagan movement. If you want to see our work with the Parliament continue, we need your support NOW […] Here’s the good news: with the help of Pagans, $230,000 has been raised. The Parliament needs to raise $45,000 more — but we have only 4 days to do it.”

If you want to donate as part of the Pagan community, you can do so here. As I’ve said before, ensuring that the Parliament of the World’s Religions survives ultimately serves our needs, and we should strive to see that it does. I have no doubt that the global interfaith community will rally in time to save the Parliament, and I would like to make sure that Pagan involvement in this organization’s survival is a dominant theme.

Hexenfest 2013: In 2012 Sharon Knight and Winter of the band Pandemonaeon, along with fashion designer Anaar, held the very first Hexenfest, an attempt to build an arts festival in the Bay Area of California that appeals to fans of mythic music and dance. This year, the event will be held in Alameda, California, featuring performances from Arcane Dimension and Pandemonaeon, dance performances from Morpheus Ravenna and Anaar, a fashion show, and DJing by DJ Skellington.  However, since this is a new event still establishing itself, they need community support to make it happen. So they are throwing a quick IndieGoGo campaign to cover expenses beforehand.

“We are Sharon Knight, Winter, and Anaar. Two musicians and a fashion designer/ belly dancer inspired by myth, magick, and the realms of faerie. All three of us tour the country as performing artists. We found it strange that, although the Bay Area has a thriving Pagan community, it has produced relatively few music or art festivals. So we decided to create one, right here in our home town. Hexenfest is an annual festival of music, art and dance with roots in the Pagan community. At Hexenfest, you’ll find talented artists whose work reflects themes based in myth, legend, folkloric tradition, earth spirituality, fairytale and the like.  We’re drawn to the darkly exotic—the Forbidden Forest as opposed to the Enchanted Wood. “

Their goals are relatively modest, and you can get tickets and VIP treatment for donating. While there are many Pagan events that feature musical acts, and cultural events that are certainly Pagan-friendly, there are relatively few Pagan events that solely concentrate on music and art that originates from within our interconnected communities. This is an excellent opportunity for folks in the Bay Area to build something of lasting value. You can find out more at the event’s official Facebook page, or simply head to their IndieGoGo campaign site.

Houston Pagan Conference: Another regional-focused fundraiser comes from Texas where the Houston-based group Blackberry Circle are hoping to throw a Pagan conference “to not only bring this community together but to also bring forth ideas and discussions on various aspects of faith and practice.”

“This 2013 Pagan Conference is for those interested in the pagan approach to magic as an integral path to the divine. This will be the first pagan conference in the Gulf Coast area in over 30 years and is sponsored by Blackberry Circle, an eclectic Wiccan teaching coven located in Southeast Texas. Please donate to help ensure this conference is not only a success this year, but for years to come.”

For those who’ve wanted a Pagan conference experience like PantheaCon, ConVocation, or PaganiCon but have trouble leaving their geographic region, this seems like a good development for the Gulf Coast region. The planned event is to be held in May, further details are pending, though the organizers encourage people with questions to contact them. You can find the campaign at GoFundMe, where they hope to raise $3,500.

In Other Pagan Fundraising Initiatives News:

Those are the highlighted campaigns for this edition. Please send me word of your crowdfunding campaigns, and I may spotlight them on a future edition of this ongoing feature. Let’s all work together to promote important projects within our community, and destroy the notion that we can’t or won’t fund projects that are important to us. If you can’t donate, the best way to help is to share these campaigns to your social networks, exposing them to as many people as possible. Thanks for reading, and thank you for supporting Pagan community!

A bright and ongoing success story in the Pagan community has been the utilization of crowd-funding sites like IndieGoGo and Kickstarter to collectively raise funds for important projects. Starhawk raised over $75,000 dollars to help fund a pitch-reel in order get a feature film based on her book “The Fifth Sacred Thing” made. Peter Dybing helped raise $30,000 dollars for Doctors Without Borders in the wake of the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami. Pagan singer-songwriter SJ Tucker was amazed when a Kickstarter campaign for Tricky Pixie’s European tour more than doubled their initial goal in a matter of hours (and kept on growing). In addition, several smaller initiatives have managed to collectively raise thousands for Pagan projects: The readers of The Wild Hunt funded the proposed budget of this site for a year, Chicago-based Pagan/magical performance troupe Terra Mysterium raised funds for their new show “The Alembic,”and the Goddess community funded a documentary film in honor of Merlin Stone.

Crowdfunding sites allow an easy mechanism for fundraising in communities that may have social networks and organizations, but not the robust money-raising infrastructure of already-established mainstream institutions. This is a place modern Paganism is in today, and more and more of us are turning to these sites as a solution to our “money problem.” There are hundreds of thousands of Pagans out there, millions around the world, and they desire to see our projects and initiatives advance just as much as any other faith community. So here are some Pagan Fundraising Initiatives that you might want to contribute to.

The Ancient Egyptian Daybook: Egyptologist Tamara Siuda, author of “The Ancient Egyptian Prayerbook,” has been involved with the Pagan community for years in a number of different roles. She’s probably best known as a pivotal figure in Kemetic Orthodoxy, and more recently, as a mambo in Haitian Vodou. When she announced that she was fundraising to produce an Ancient Egyptian Daybook through Kickstarter so that interested individuals could keep track of all those wonderful ancient Egyptian holidays, she quickly surpassed her initial goal of $3000, and is quickly creeping up on $9000.

My name is Tamara Siuda. I’m an Egyptologist. (Yes, I’ve even played one on TV.) I’ve been translating hieroglyphs, teaching, and writing about ancient Egyptians for two decades. A few years ago, I published The Ancient Egyptian Prayerbook. It includes translations of prayers, hymns, and magical incantations from Egypt’s pharaonic times. It also includes a very basic ancient calendar, because there wasn’t room for all my research. I’d like to give that calendar some more attention. With your help, I can publish The Ancient Egyptian Daybook. This Daybook will include all my research into ancient Egypt’s calendar. It will also include an optional blank perpetual calendar in a journal or planner format, so you can keep track of these holidays today, if you want!

With a little over a week left, she’s making plans for 10K, 20K, and 40K “stretch” goals, with various incentives. So if you want to jump on this project before the fundraising window closes, now’s the time. Wild Hunt columnist Stacey Lawless will be writing more about this fundraiser in her next column, which will also touch on her PantheaCon experiences. I think Pagans looking at how to do a successful crowdfunding initiative should study all the things that Tamara Siuda did right.

Commemorative Blue Plaque For Doreen Valiente: Doreen Valiente is rightly called the “mother of modern Witchcraft” by many, and her writings have had a huge shaping influence on religious Witchcraft as a whole. The Centre For Pagan Studies is currently raising funds to place the first in a series of commemorative blue plaques to honor Valiente and other key figures in modern Pagan history.

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“The first Blue Plaque is the Doreen Valiente Plaque. We have been working on this for a number of years with Brighton and Hove City Council and we are pleased to announce that Doreen’s Plaque will be going on the wall at the apartments where she lived for 30 years and the location where she did most of her seminal writing. The event will take place on the Summer solstice this year – i.e. 21st June 2013. We are having to pay for the commemorative plaque ourselves so we need your help to raise 1200 pounds. This is to cover 750 pounds manufacturing cost and the remainder is for the installation. Time is short so please donate to this great cause. This will be a number of firsts. The plaque as afar as we can find out will be the first council apartment block. It certainly will be the first plaque that celebrates the life of one of our own. There are plaques commemorating the wrong doings, but this is the first to honor a witch.”

You can donate towards the cause, here. Future planned plaques include one for Gerald Gardner in 2014, and one for Alex Sanders in 2015.

In Other Pagan Fundraising Initiatives News:

Those are the highlighted campaigns for this edition. Please send me word of your crowdfunding campaigns, and I may spotlight them on a future edition of this ongoing feature. Let’s all work together to promote important projects within our community, and destroy the notion that we can’t or won’t fund projects that are important to us. If you can’t donate, the best way to help is to share these campaigns to your social networks, exposing them to as many people as possible. Thanks for reading, and thank you for supporting Pagan community!

No matter what your belief system a whole lot of people are kicking off their holiday shopping today (or really, really, early this morning). Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday, all initiatives to get people to spend their money early, to trigger that flood of commerce that many businesses, both small and large, depend on to survive. However, I believe this is also a great time to think about how the money you spend now could be used to help build important projects within the larger interconnected Pagan community. Perhaps a donation made in honor of a local elder, teacher, or friend who is active in building and supporting Pagan infrastructure.

A bright and ongoing success story in the Pagan community has been the utilization of crowd-funding sites like IndieGoGo and Kickstarter to collectively raise funds for important projects.Starhawk raised over $75,000 dollars to help fund a pitch-reel in order get a feature film based on her book “The Fifth Sacred Thing” made. Peter Dybing helped raise $30,000 dollars for Doctors Without Borders in the wake of the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami. Pagan singer-songwriter SJ Tucker was amazed when a Kickstarter campaign for Tricky Pixie’s European tour more than doubled their initial goal in a matter of hours (and kept on growing). In addition, several smaller initiatives have managed to collectively raise thousands for Pagan projects: The readers of The Wild Hunt funded the proposed budget of this site for a year, Chicago-based Pagan/magical performance troupe Terra Mysterium raised funds for their new show “The Alembic,”and the Goddess community funded a documentary film in honor of Merlin Stone.

Crowdfunding sites allow an easy mechanism for fundraising in communities that may have social networks and organizations, but not the robust money-raising infrastructure of already-established mainstream institutions. This is a place modern Paganism is in today, and more and more of us are turning to these sites as a solution to our “money problem.” There are hundreds of thousands of Pagans out there, millions around the world, and they desire to see our projects and initiatives advance just as much as any other faith community. On this “Black Friday” I’d like to bring two fundraising initiatives that I think are worthy of your support, and might just be the perfect gift for the community-minded Pagan on your list.

New Alexandrian Library Raises Funds to Finish Construction: At the end of 2011 the New Alexandrian Library, a project that hopes to create “a library worthy of its namesake” focused on esoteric knowledge, mystical and the spiritual writings from many traditions, officially broke ground on their physical space in Delaware.  Then, the foundations for that library were poured for the dome structure that will be erected. This past Fall a successful IndieGoGo fundraiser was launched to pay for the next stage of construction. Now, the New Alexandrian Library has launched the second phase of their fundraising campaign, $10,500 dollars to pay for the next stage of construction. In a guest post during the last round of fundraising, Michael Smith, an Elder in the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel, explained why this initiative is so important.

“The primary aims of the Library are: 1) to secure the resources to ensure the Library is wholly owned and administered by Pagans and contributes to the real-asset community infrastructure; 2) provide ongoing stewardship for our communities’ work and essence; and 3) make the collected materials as convenient as possible for the community to access. Ultimately, the Library will be a resource to support new academic study and research to further develop our community for centuries to come.”

Many of us talk about Pagan infrastructure, but the New Alexandrian Library Project is doing Pagan infrastructure; you can actually see the results of your donations as the first dome rises.

The New Alexandrian Library Rises

The New Alexandrian Library Rises

This campaign runs through December 8th, and so far only 7 funders have donated. I think we can collectively do much, much better, especially for a project that will benefit so many of us. Further, all donations are tax deductible, so why not give your taxes a little gift along with building needed Pagan infrastructure?

A Documentary to Awaken the Gods and Goddesses of Brazil: The next project I’d like to endorse is by Layne Redmond, author of “When the Drummers Were Women: A Spiritual History of Rhythm,” who is producing a documentary entitled “Axé Orixá: Dreaming Awake the Gods & Goddesses of Brazil.”

“Axé Orixá (pronounced ashay orishah) is a film of the dance, drumming and chants of the Orixás (Afro-Brazilian gods and goddesses) and how they manifest today through some of Bahia’s greatest musicians and legendary dancers. The film unfolds through dreamlike sequences of music and dance featuring seven of the Orixás delicately linked through the artists’ explanation of their spiritual realities, and how the rituals live on in Brazilian culture today. Axé Orixá enables modern Bahian artists to reimagine their traditions in a uniquely visionary form.”

The campaign has raised nearly $20,000 of its $30,500 goal, and has 23 days to go. A $35 dollar donation gets you (or someone you love) a copy of the completed documentary. In a recent letter to supporters, Redmond made it known that she’s been dealing with several rounds of breast cancer and its treatment, and that finishing this film has taken on a renewed sense of urgency because of this.

“Realizing the film meant something to people, I coudn’t wait to finish the project.  But then I found out I had breast cancer.  Everything came to a stand still as I went through the first surgery and recovery, and then it came back and I had the second surgery and then it came back again and I had to let go of the project.  The hardest thing about having a cancer diagnosis is that you lose your sense of a future, you give up your projects, and you don’t know how much longer you are going to live.  In reality we never know how long we are going to live and now that I’ve accepted that and prepared to die, a great weight has lifted from my mind.  And on top of it I haven’t died! :D 

In fact I feel great!  I started a weight training program in July, along with all my other health regimens and have just gotten stronger and stronger.   And then Daniel Sabio showed up, a young computational media student taking a gap year between undergrad and grad school who loved the music I recorded for Axé Orixá and has put his incredible talents and energy behind helping this come into manifestation.”

I think that more documentaries on the African diasporic religions are needed, and one focused on dance and choreography within Candomblé can only help shed more (positive) light on a faith that is still largely unknown by many in the United States. So head over to the campaign page, and check it out!

These are just two great examples of how you could use your money this holiday season to support Pagan infrastructure. In addition, you could also donate to organizations that are doing good work, but may not be running an active campaign right now. Initiatives like Cherry Hill Seminary, who’ve made great strides towards becoming an accredited Pagan learning institution, the Adocentyn Research Library, or Solar Cross Temple. There are a variety of choices before you, some local, some national, some international, but all could use greater support from us. So this holiday season, think about the gifts that could reverberate for generations to come but building our religious and spiritual infrastructure.

[The following is a guest post from Michael Smith. Michael Smith, Gwydion Stormcrow, has been practicing Wicca, Magick, and various esoteric disciplines since 1989. He has been active in the pagan community since 1993 when he became a member of the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel (ASW), a Wiccan organization in the Mid-Atlantic region. He is an Elder of the ASW and is currently serving as High Priest of Coven of the Rowan Star, a coven in that Tradition. He is also involved with the Tradition’s New Alexandrian Library.]

(Skimmers, the bold is for you! ;-) )

The New Alexandrian Library (an Indigogo fundraising drive) is a project that has been in process since 2000, when the idea was first presented to the larger pagan community at the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel (the Assembly) at the first Between the Worlds Conference. The dream was and remains to create an academic-quality repository for the writing, art, cultural artifacts and wisdoms of religions and practices in the esoteric traditions (‘Pagans’, for lack of a more convenient label).

Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary with Assembly Elders at NAL's foundation.

Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary with Assembly Elders at NAL’s foundation.

The primary aims of the Library are: 1) to secure the resources to ensure the Library is wholly owned and administered by Pagans and contributes to the real-asset community infrastructure; 2) provide ongoing stewardship for our communities’ work and essence; and 3) make the collected materials as convenient as possible for the community to access. Ultimately, the Library will be a resource to support new academic study and research to further develop our community for centuries to come.

It is vitally important at this time that we create and maintain real pagan infrastructure. The transition from the Age of Pisces to the Age of Aquarius threatens the continued dominance of the current mass religions and they have reacted by trying to institutionalize their faiths in the secular realms of government and law. The ‘major religions’ fear diminishing dominance in the new Age and that has resulted in collections of pagan materials being marginalized or made unavailable in and by the large non-pagan institutions that now hold them – even more than when we were just considered ‘unimportant’. Many collections are difficult to access or are maintained in obscurity. Much of the accumulated wisdom of pagan people has been lost in past times of transition. We must make serious effort to create structures to ensure as a much as possible gets through this transition.

This Library will be/is owned and stewarded by a Wiccan organization, in services to the wider esoteric community. The collections will not be marginalized in some dark, inaccessible backroom of an indifferent institution. The whole purpose of this project is to ensure that our culture, philosophy, wisdom and creation have another stage to be seen, studied and expanded!

New Alexandrian Library foundation.

New Alexandrian Library foundation.

Assembly members believe so strongly in this need that 80% of the funds to build the project has come from Assembly members (>$150,000 to date) and several members have donated shared ownership of ~100 acres of forest to the ASW and the Library project. The land, the structures and all of its materials will be in the stewardship of a Pagan Tradition. Plans are also being made, of course, to establish long-term resources for maintenance of this living treasure of our community.

Mind you, of course, none of us are rich. We share this to let you know that we are not just spending other people’s hard earned donations – that we put our money where our mouth is. But, make no mistake, this cannot happen to its potential without the financial support of the wider community to create and maintain this vital resource.

As our many of our seminal teachers, visionaries, leaders and thinkers pass to the next life – their collected wisdom is often lost. We have all heard stories of decades of newsletters, articles, teachings, research, vision, and other inspiration being lost because there was simply no place for these collections to go. Often times, non-pagan family members do not recognize the value of their loved ones’ work to the larger pagan community. Sometimes, it is simply thrown out.

Each time this happens it is a tragic loss to the entire community. Every living tradition must have connection to its roots, ancient and modern, to help feed it’s grow and evolution. The Library, in network with other efforts like it, will be a solution to this challenge, providing our community Elders with a resource that can receive, preserve and honor their work.

And, of course, researchers, academics, teachers, seekers and the curious must have access to the collection to inspire deeper understanding of our history, theologies, worldviews, and concepts – as well as greater appreciation of the viewpoints of other esoteric paths. The Library will continue its efforts to make sure that as much of the collection as possible is accessible via the web, inter-pagan-library lending and onsite visits. In this way, the Library will be a cornerstone of the new magickal renaissance, encouraging expansion of esoteric theory and philosophy and of honest and open interchange of ideas and experiences between paths.

We are nearing fruition of over a decade of work. The Library is rising! It is heart stirring to walk out to the site and see the physical manifestation of this idea coming to life, the dome rising into the air like the dawning sun, the coming of a new light of understanding into the world – and our pagan world.

We do not ask for your financial support lightly. We are in this for the long haul to benefit the current generation of witches, pagans, magicians, shamans, druids, and everyone else and to leave behind a growing legacy of learning, scholarship, experience and ecstasy for future generations. We are the Ancestors of the lines of magickal thinkers and doers in the future. Even as we have built upon that which was left to us from ancient and not-so-ancient times, so too will our work become the foundation upon which our heirs will build. Help us all leave a heritage worthy of honor to those that follow. With your donations, New Alexandrian Library will become a part of the foundation and legacy we leave, with optimism and blessings, to the future.

If you believe in this vision of our esoteric community surviving and thriving into the new Age with vigor and foresight, make a donation to the New Alexandrian Library at our Indigogo fundraising drive (http://igg.me/p/190140).

To date, 686 people have visited the indigogo campaign. If everyone that visited donated only $50-75 (and got a sweet chant CD or two as a thank you!), we would have enough to birth this important pagan asset and have a weatherproof, concrete, long-lived repository for a great collection of the esoteric community’s thoughts, teachings and essence – for all of us!

Be a part of the coming Magickal Renaissance. Thank you!

A bright and ongoing success story in the Pagan community has been the utilization of crowd-funding sites like IndieGoGo and Kickstarter to collectively raise funds for important projects. Starhawk raised over $75,000 dollars to help fund a pitch-reel in order get a feature film based on her book “The Fifth Sacred Thing” made. Peter Dybing helped raise $30,000 dollars for Doctors Without Borders in the wake of the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami. Pagan singer-songwriter SJ Tucker was amazed when a Kickstarter campaign for Tricky Pixie’s European tour more than doubled their initial goal in a matter of hours (and kept on growing). In addition, several smaller initiatives have managed to collectively raise thousands for Pagan projects: The readers of The Wild Hunt funded my upcoming trip to the American Academy of Religion’s Annual Meeting, Chicago-based Pagan/magical performance troupe Terra Mysterium raised funds for their new show “The Alembic,” and the Goddess community funded a documentary film in honor of Merlin Stone.

Crowdfunding sites allow an easy mechanism for fundraising in communities that may have social networks and organizations, but not the robust money-raising infrastructure of already-established mainstream institutions. This is a place modern Paganism is in today, and more and more of us are turning to these sites as a solution to our “money problem.” There are hundreds of thousands of Pagans out there, millions around the world, and they desire to see our projects and initiatives advance just as much as any other faith community. So I’ve started a new feature to regularly check in on fundraising campaigns within our interconnected communities in hopes of giving them wider exposure, and also documenting the crowdfunding phenomenon as it relates to modern Pagans. I hope you’ll find things to support, and also learn important lessons in what makes a campaign succeed.

Send Patrick McCollum to Awakened World 2012: Longtime readers should be familiar with Pagan chaplain and activist Patrick McCollum. Patrick has been working as a Pagan chaplain and activist for well over twenty years. He was one of the founding members of the Lady Liberty League, and has been involved in numerous legal struggles involving modern Pagans. In 2008, he testified before the US Commission on Civil Rights on prisoner’s religious rights, saying he “found discrimination against minority faiths everywhere”and that the problem was “endemic.” Today his work continues as he travels the world acting as global ambassador for modern Paganism, visiting India, Jordan, Thailand, and other locales, advocating for cooperation and sharing a Pagan perspective with the world’s religions. Because of his work he’s been invited to be a facilitator at Awakened World 2012 in Rome, Italy. To get there he needs to raise 3,500 dollars to cover his expenses.

“I have been invited to join the Dalai Lama’s International Peace Council and the Association for Global New Thought as a Core Group Leader to help facilitate a world event in Rome, Italy, Awakened World 2012 this October. The event will be attended by many of the foremost political, religious and human rights leaders in the world, and my fellow Core Group team will include such luminaries as: Yolande IIiano, Chairperson, Religions for Peace Europe, HH Pujya Swami Chidananda Saraswati, President of Parmarth Niketan Ashram in India, one of India’s largest spiritual institutions, Sister Joan Chittister, OSB, CO-Chair of the Global Peace Initiative for Women, His Eminence Walter Cardinal Kasper, President, Pontifical Council for Ecumenism, Ela Gandhi, former South African Parliamentarian and granddaughter of Mahatma Gandhi, Dean Lawrence Carter, Dean of Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, Rev. Marcus Braybrooke, President of the World Congress of Faiths, and Lynne Twist of the Pachamama Alliance and others.

Each of the esteemed Core Group Leaders are being supported by their communities to attend and facilitate the gathering, and so I am asking you my spiritual community, to join together and support me also, so our voices will be heard and Paganism and Earth Based Spiritual Traditions will be represented at the table when the discussions regarding the future of our planet take place.”

The event takes place this October, so Patrick has only a month to raise the money. If you want to support Patrick McCollum’s work, please spread the word or donate to this endeavor. As an aside, I want to note briefly that I helped set up the campaign for the Patrick McCollum Foundation, but I’m not working directly for the foundation on this campaign. All monies go directly to the Patrick McCollum Foundation to fund this trip.

New Alexandrian Library Raises Funds to Finish Construction: At the end of 2011 the New Alexandrian Library, a project that hopes to create “a library worthy of its namesake” focused on esoteric knowledge, mystical and the spiritual writings from many traditions, officially broke ground on their physical space in Delaware.  Last month the foundations for that library were poured for the dome structure that will be erected. Now,an IndieGoGo fundraiser has been launched to pay for the next stage of construction. I originally reported on this campaign at the beginning of August, and since then they’ve managed to raise over $3000 dollars towards their $12,500 goal. There are 21 days left to go, so if you want to help realize a physical Pagan-owned and run library on the East Coast this is an excellent time to join the campaign.

“The New Alexandrian Library (NAL) will be a resource for those that believe in true freedom and equality for religious studies – a resource that includes all of the esoteric and non-mainstream (but growing!) religions – not just the the usual 3 or 4.  The NAL will make as much content (literature, periodicals, art…) available via the web the greates extent allowed by copyright law, etc.  – so it can be a true resource for ALL of those that can benefit from such a resource!

We are the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel, a legally recognized Wiccan non-profit religious organization based in the Mid-Atlantic region. The form of Wicca that the Assembly practices is syncretic and draws inspiration from Astrology, Qabala, the Western Magickal Tradition and the folk religions of Europe. Keepers of the Holly Chalice, the founding coven of the Assembly began its life in February of 1984. The Assembly was incorporated in the state of Delaware in 1993 and was granted 501(c)(3) status by the IRS in 1995.”

The NAL project has already started building an impressive collection, one that includes the recent acquisition of rare Dion Fortune paintings gifted by Dolores Ashcroft Nowicki. As NAL board member Ivo Dominguez Jr says in the video above, this is a project initiated by us, for us, one that deserves our support so that it can become a reality. For more information check out their Facebook page, or go to their official website. You can read all of The Wild Hunt’s coverage of the New Alexandrian Library project, here. I’m hoping to further spotlight this initiative in the near future with a guest post from the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel.

A Pagan Chamber Choir Hopes to Fund First CD: The Orpheus Pagan Chamber Choir, located in Denver, Colorado, seeks to “build community by  sharing  with our audiences the power and beauty of choral music from many historical and cultural traditions.” As this Pagan choir has gained attention within their local community, more and more people have asked when they will record a CD of their music, so they’ve launched this fundraiser to make it happen.

“Ever since Orpheus was founded, people have been asking, “Do you have a CD?” With your help, we’ll be able to say, “Yes, and here it is!” We’ve become known for our unique events: our Twelfth Night Yule Concert & Viking Feast, our programs that fuse ancient with future. Why should our CD be different? We want to make the world premiere recording of the powerful Missa Druidica, our unique covers of Mummers’ Dance, Ancient Mother, We Won’t Wait, and other favorite Orpheus tunes.

We want to record just the way you love us: live musicians doing something that seems to touch people’s souls. We’re over 30 voices and instrumentalists. We can’t just hole up in someone’s garage and turn on a switch. If we were in Hollywood or New York, we could find a studio large enough to hold all of us, but here in Denver we need to rent space and a satellite recording truck! And we’re not using digital instrumental sounds either. It will be all live, all real, all Orpheus.”

They’ve already raised $1,475 of their $4000 goal, with 43 days left to go on their campaign. A $25 dollar donation gets you a pre-released edition of the CD. So if you’re a fan of Pagan choral music, be sure to check this campaign out!

Those are the highlighted campaigns for this edition. Please send me word your crowdfunding campaigns, and I may spotlight them on a future edition of this new feature. Let’s all work together to promote important projects within our community, and destroy the notion that we can’t or won’t fund projects that are important to us. If you can’t donate, the best way to help is to share these campaigns to your social networks, exposing them to as many people as possible. Thanks for reading, and thank you for supporting Pagan community!