Archives For interfaith partners of South Carolina

10296216_10153167430591104_642259405498786551_oIsis Books & Gifts, a metaphysical store located in Englewood, Colorado, erected its new sign after the original was destroyed by vandals. As we reported in November, the bookstore’s sign was destroyed shortly after the terrorist attacks on Paris and Lebanon. At the time, bookstore owner Karen Charboneau-Harrison told local news, “I don’t know if somebody walking down the street just saw our name on the sign and kind of lost it for a moment and threw a rock through it … or if it was an ignorant person who actually thought this was a bookstore for terrorists, I don’t know.”

The vandals were never caught, but Charboneau-Harrison immediately had a new sign created. However, this sign is slightly different. On a blue background, it reads “Goddess Books & Gifts” with an image of Isis to the left. And, the website graphic now reads the same. However, the store has not changed its name; only the sign and graphic have been altered. Charboneau-Harrison wrote on Facebook, “We are deflecting the attention of folks who flunked their 6th grade basic mythology class (and have anger issues) away from us and our signage.”

After the initial vandalism, the store received an outpouring of support in messages and donations. Currently, they are selling bumper stickers that read, “Isis is the Goddess of Healing, Family & Wisdom. Support Isis Books & Gifts.” Charboneau-Harrison added that that they feel strongly about keeping the name Isis, but also do not want to draw more violence to the business.

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Norse MythologyOn Dec 23, Dr. Karl E. H. Seigfried’s work was featured on the BBC Radio series “Religion in the North.” Last July, he was contacted by Senior Producer Phil Pegum, who was interested in developing a series of programs that celebrated “the life and culture of the countries of the north.” Pegum asked Dr. Seigfried to write and record an essay “on the continuing popularity of Norse mythology, its broader cultural significance, and the resurgence of Heathen religion in recent decades.”

Dr. Seigfried’s recording aired third in a series of five episodes on the subject as part of Radio 3’s program “The Essay.” The other four include, “Forests and Faith under the Northern Lights,” Christmas Father: Lars Petter Sveen,”  “A Swedish Christmas: Andrew Brown,” and “Winter Solstice: Hanne Orstavik.” This series corresponds to Radio 3’s larger seasonal programming focusing on the world’s “northernmost territories.”

Dr. Seigfried’s essay runs fifteen minutes. The full text is published on his Norse Mythology blog, along with an embedded recording. Or you can listen to the full piece, as well as the others, directly through BBC Radio 3.

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269241_415493488489950_1381333520_nOn Dec. 29, the Interfaith Partners of South Carolina gathered at the State House for its annual meeting to discuss interfaith awareness in the state. Although not in attendance for the meeting this year, Gov. Nikki Haley did, once again for the fourth year in a row, make the declaration that January would be Interfaith Harmony Month.

In addition to discussing interfaith awareness, the organization was also there to address concerns over the rise in Islamaphobia both in the South Carolina region and the country. In a recent media release, the organization clearly stated its concerns saying that “Muslims have lived in South Carolina for three centuries.” And they added:

Our Interfaith Partners members include many religions and spiritual paths, including Muslim, Christian, Hindu, Sikh, Baha’i, Buddhist, Pagan, Native American, Unitarian Universalist, Jewish, and more.  We work for harmonious communities through our interfaith activities because we understand the fragile bonds upon which our democracy is built. Peace in America depends upon the ability of diverse peoples to value diversity without perceiving those differences to be a threat.

Cherry Hill Seminary Director Holli Emore is a vocal and organizing partner in this interfaith group and spoke at the state house gathering. After the meeting, she was interviewed by a local CBS affiliate, saying “I want people to remember that you need to take time to listen to other people.”

With the official declaration of Interfaith Harmony Month, the interfaith organization is planning a number of activities to educate the population and advocate for peace. All upcoming January events are listed on the organization’s site.

In Other News:

  • Beginning today, the long-awaited novel City of Refuge is available to the public. In 2015, Starhawk opted to self-publish her new book, which is a sequel to her popular novel The Fifth Sacred Thing. Previously, the book was only available for special pre-orders through Starhawk’s successful kickstarter campaign. Now the book can be found on Amazon and other similar sites.
  • For fans of blogger Sara Amis’ writing, she will be featured in an upcoming edition of Cicada, a literary magazine for young people. According to Amis, the March/April issue will focus on witches. While her own piece, titled “The Witch’s Egg,” was not written specifically as a children’s story, she said that it is “fairy-tale-esque and they went with it.” Amis added, “It’s actually kind of a fairy tale about a middle-aged woman finding her own power. What a tween girl will make of it I don’t know, but I think it’s good for them to see an older adult female protagonist who isn’t stereotypical.” The issue will be available February.
  • The Norse Mythology Blog announced its art winners for midwinter 2015. In the adult category, first place went to Maria Bogdanova of Finland with her painting depicting the “Lady of the Winter, the goddess of heaven.” Second place went to Ida M. Kozłowski of Poland, and third place was award to Jorge Alves de Lima Júnior of Brazil. In the teen category, the first place winner was Heather Mathis of the U.S., age 16, with her depiction of “Frau Holle.” Second place went to Marquellius Nunn,of the U.S., age 19, and third to Stefano J. of the U.S., age 15. Lastly, in the kids category, the first place winner was Katie U. of the U.S., age 11, with her painting depicting “Frau Holle.” The second place winner was Rowan Chiment-Scimeca of the U.S., age 8, and the third place winner was Paul Jules Butler of Germany, age 7.
  • Now that the first issue of A Beautiful Resistance has been published and distributed, the editors are looking toward the next issue. They have posted a call for submissions. Issue #2 will be edited and curated by poet Lorna Smithers and published in May, around Beltane. The deadline for all submissions is March 1.
  • Although Pagan festival season is still several months away, registration has opened for one of the earliest such gatherings. The second annual Equinox in the Oaks is now open for business. The event, which will be held once again in Pierson, Florida, is a weekend long “earth-centered, ethically-focused, family-affirming festival.” It debuted last year on the weekend of the Spring Equinox. This year, it will be held from March 24-27, 2016.