Archives For Correspondences

Pagan Community Notes is a series focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. Reinforcing the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So let’s get started!

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Starhawk

Environmental activist Jon Young, founder of the Wilderness Awareness School, and Starhawk, activist and author of “The Spiral Dance,” recently took part in a discussion with The Pachamama Alliance concerning environmental justice, social justice, and “awakening to our original design.” Quote:  “Starhawk sheds light on creative ways of making rituals for passages to the natural world, involving art, dance, senses, and smells. We as humans, can truly engage through ritual in a natural space. This can connect each of us to the human community to celebrate meaningful human passages and the natural world. She recounts learning to sit in nature and put herself in a state of consciousness so she can take in what’s going on around her. This allows the the natural world to really speak on a very deep and profound level. She recalls her introduction to permaculture coupled with spirituality awareness and how John Young’s work helped her access the important things in her life.” I’ve embedded the Youtube video recording of the discussion below.

 

Pantheon FoundationThe Pantheon Foundation, which provides support to Pagan organizations and initiatives, has announced the creation of The Diotima Prize. Quote: “The Pantheon Foundation announces The Diotima Prize to help support the educational goals of one Pagan student who is currently in an accredited seminary program. The merit-based Prize is named for Diotima of Mantinea, the philosopher and priestess who is the teacher of Socrates in the Symposium of Plato, explaining to him the path of Divine ascent through the contemplation of Eros and Beauty. We invite all 2nd year, or later, committed Pagan Master of Divinity students at accredited seminaries in the United States to write an essay on the nature of Paganism and ministering to Pagans in a religious context.” In addition, an IndieGoGo campaign has been launched to help fund this initiative. Quote: “By giving a deserving student a modest $1000 scholarship, we as a community can help to alleviate some of the burden of a person who will then take on being of service to us when their education is complete. We are not only investing in their future, we are investing in our own.” [Note: The Wild Hunt is one of the organizations that receives 501c3 fiscal oversight of the Pantheon Foundation.]

Plans for the New Alexandrian LibraryThe New Alexandrian Library, a project of the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel which hopes to create an institution that will become “one of the cornerstones of a new magickal renaissance,” continues apace with the construction of their Delaware-based dome structure. They’ve now reached the drywall hanging-phase, and are asking for donations to continue the work. Quote: “We are at the drywall hanging stage of the construction process, please help us preserve our history through your donation. This is a pay as we go project with no bank loan so as not to burden the next generation with debt.” At NAL’s official Facebook page, they’ve been posting photos of their progress. Donation information can be found, here. You can read all of The Wild Hunt’s coverage of this project, here. You may also want to check out Heather Greene’s recent editorial on the importance of archiving, which mentions the NAL project. Quote: “Similarly, in southern Delaware, the Assembly of the Sacred Wheel is raising money to finish the construction of the New Alexandrian Research Library (NAL). The ‘Library will be collecting materials from all religious traditions focusing on their mystical and the spiritual writings.’ Founders hope that NAL will serve as both a functional community and research center.”

ll prep at NAL.

Drywall prep at NAL.

 In Other Pagan Community News:

  • The latest issue of Correspondences: An Online Journal for the Academic Study of Western Esotericism (volume 2, number 1) has just been released online. Quote: “Welcome to the second issue of Correspondences, the first (and to date only)open access journal for the academic study of Western esotericism. In our last editorial we invited you to learn about the history and purpose of this journal, and we are happy to be able deliver another issue of cutting-edge research into what is undoubtedly one of the most fascinating and up-andcoming fields of research in the humanities.”
  • Pagan blogger Rebecca (aka Mad Gastronomer) proposes a food-not-bombs-style initiative for local Pagan communities. Quote: “Once a week, some of you get together, cook up some simple food — a lot of it, fifty to a hundred meals’ worth — go to some busy space, like a park or a community center (the HKs used the student union courtyard), set up tables, and give it away. Free. Just… feed people.” 
  • Wild Hunt columnist Rhyd Wildermuth is raising funds so he can travel to the Polytheist Leadership Conference. Quote: “From July 11th to July 13th, a group of gods-worshipers are attending a conference in Fishkill, NY where we’ll be discussing what precisely we’re doing, how to do it better, and more coherently for others.  Gods seem to be flooding back into the world, or we’re noticing them more, and the point of this gathering is to figure out what this all means for ourselves, each other, the world, and the gods. I submitted a proposal and was accepted as a presenter, but I don’t yet have a way to get there.  So I’m asking for your help.” If he makes his goal, we can have him share his experiences at TWH! Which I think would be cool!
  • A new Pagan site, Neo-Paganism.org, has launched in a “beta” version. Quote: “Neo-Paganism.org represents an attempt to outline a distinctly Neo-Paganism, which is distinct from both devotional and reconstructionist polytheisms and from traditional esoteric witchcraft.”

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  • Brandy Williams reviews the newly-released volume of the Abraxas journal. Quote: “The breadth of content is impressive. Literary editor Christina Oakley Harrington points out that the contributors span Europe and America, and their essays touch on the ancient world as well as the modern. She did not point this out, but I was pleased to see that a significant number of contributors are women and one identifies as metagender, as so often esoteric conversation is dominated by men’s conversation (and white men at that).” Get your own copy here.
  • The Pagan Unity Festival (PUF) in Tennessee has issued a press release about their lineup, and a cancellation. Quote: “Oberon Zell was scheduled to present, but the failing health of Morning Glory has altered where his presence and focus need to be. This news is very sad, and we send out our love and support to them both and their family. We will be offering Oberon’s latest book for sale at the festival and all proceeds will go to him and Morning Glory.” PUF starts this Thursday.

That’s all I have for right now, have a great day!

There are lots of articles and essays of interest to modern Pagans out there, sometimes more than I can write about in-depth in any given week. So The Wild Hunt must unleash the hounds in order to round them all up.

Pagan Federation banner.

Pagan Federation banner.

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Correspondences journal.

  • A new academic journal of Western Esotericism, Correspondences, has been announced.  Quote: “By providing a wider forum of debate regarding issues and currents in Western esotericism than has previously been possible, Correspondences is committed to publishing work of a high academic standard as determined by a peer-review process, but does not require academic credentials as prerequisite for publication. Students and non-affiliated academics are encouraged to join established scholars in submitting insightful, well-researched articles that offer new ideas, positions, or information to the field.” First issues is due in June, call for papers, here.
  • Mars Hill pastor Mark Driscoll is a thuggish Christian power-tripper who thinks he’s edgy because he writes about having sex with his wife. He’d be a huge joke were it not for his rampant (almost cultish) popularity in the Pacific Northwest. Now, the Seattle mega-pastor is attacking Twilight (because he’s oh-so-relevant) for sinking teen girls into Paganism and the occult. Quote: “…girls the same age of my 15-year-old daughter are talking about “awakening,” which is their word for converting to paganism (like the Christian word “born again”). In a perverted twist on Communion, their sacraments include the giving of your own blood by becoming a “donor.” This is entirely pagan.” No, this is entirely inane. Despite his Seattle-denizen ambient hipster facade, Driscoll is your typical evangelical social conservative who pearl-clutches over the thought of Paganism.
  • The creepy UK Pagan who was caught with a semi-undressed underage girl in the woods has narrowly avoided being put on sex offenders registry after the judge decided that the “sexual element” wasn’t sexual enough to justify his inclusion. Quote: “Sheriff Noel McPartlin said it was ‘hard to escape the view that him being naked in the room with the girl might suggest a sexual element […] I am a bit hesitant but I do not think the sexual element is significant enough to justify placing him on the register.'” 
  • As a counter-point to the hysteria of Mark Driscoll, Richard Stearns, president of World Vision (the largest evangelical Christian relief organization in the world), suggests a culture-war cease fire between Christians and non-Christians. Quote: “We need to find a way to live in a pluralistic society without engaging in an arms race with those who are not Christians.”
  • Indian Country Today Media Network reports that a coalition of Native American spiritual leaders have signed a declaration opposing Canada’s oil sands and the new Tar Sands pipeline being proposed. Quote: “The statement, signed by more than 20 spiritual chiefs at a Sundance this summer in South Dakota, includes members of the Lakota, Navajo, Apache, Mohawk, Dine, Aztec and Ojibwe nations, spanning much of Turtle Island.”
  • Riordons Witchcraft Emporium in Australia wants you to know that they have a screening process: “Are they a borderline schizophrenic … or somehow mad? There are many vulnerable people in the world and you don’t want to make their situation worse.” Also profiled in the article is the shop Spellbox. Both establishments take pains to stress that they aren’t like Harry Potter, and they aren’t “New Age.”
  • Counter-cultural magazine Arthur has announced its return, featuring many of the magickal luminaries that made it such a hit in the first place. Quote: “Arthur’s gang of idiots, know-it-alls and village explainers are back, from Bull Tonguers Byron Coley & Thurston Moore to radical ecologist Nance Klehm to trickster activists Center for Tactical Magic to Defend Brooklyn’s socio-political commentator Dave Reeves to a host of new, fresh-faced troublemakers, edited by ol’ fool Jay Babcock and art directed by Yasmin Khan.” I suspect that this news will excite a certain portion of my readership.

That’s it for now! Feel free to discuss any of these links in the comments, some of them I may expand into longer posts as needed.