Pagan Voices: Peter Grey, Crystal Blanton, Morpheus Ravenna, and More!

Jason Pitzl-Waters —  February 27, 2014 — 5 Comments

Pagan Voices is a spotlight on recent quotations from figures within the Pagan community. These voices may appear in the burgeoning Pagan media, or from a mainstream outlet, but all showcase our wisdom, thought processes, and evolution in the public eye. Is there a Pagan voice you’d like to see highlighted? Drop me a line with a link to the story, post, or audio.

We start this week with a special video entry to Pagan Voices, a lecture by author and publisher Peter Grey on Apocalyptic Witchcraft, from Sitting Now TV. Quote: “Peter Grey, head honcho of esoteric publishers Scarlet Imprint, returns to SittingNow TV with a lecture on Apocalyptic Witchcraft!”

Enjoy! Don’t forget to check out the book from which the talk is based.

Crystal Blanton

Crystal Blanton

“This community is not the same as the one I entered a little over 11 years ago. This community is not the same as the one I was a part of even five years ago, or two years ago. The Pagan community is growing to include some of the very intricate differences among its practitioners. This makes me hopeful, hopeful in ways that I never really thought I would be able to see for the future of this community. It is not just about the acceptance of Black people that is on my mind when I talk about acceptance. It is the very beautiful rainbow of differences that we as a society represent, it is the colors of our skin to the context of our love. It is the plethora of ethnicities, genders, sizes, disabilities, capabilities, expressions of love, and hair types that I am talking about. The inclusivity of children and family specific programming, and a Pagans of color hospitality suite, show a measure of growth in our ability to acknowledge the specific needs of some of our more marginalized groups under the Pagan umbrella.” – Crystal Blanton, on the journey to redefine the Pagan umbrella.

Morpheus Ravenna

Morpheus Ravenna

“A worshiper comes in, genuflects, turns to the largest shrine, catches her breath, reaches her knees. Her friend stops and stands, hand pulled to his heart. I sit in stillness, eyes half-lidded, one heartbeat here in this Temple, one heartbeat in its counterpart in the Otherworld, watching in both. Visitors come and go. A woman whispers urgently on her knees before the Great Queen. Another worshiper stands with the gaze of rapture, smiles, pours out whiskey. Another weeps achingly. I begin to sing. This was the Coru Temple at PantheaCon last weekend. On Friday afternoon, we began building the Temple as soon as we arrived at the convention, first purifications in a nearly-empty room before building the altars. All afternoon and into the evening the priests gathered, swirling about the space, raising the shrines, laying out the regalia, preparing the offerings. That night with a room full of worshipers, we consecrated the Temple of the Morrígan and the Tuatha. We invoked the Gods, heroes, ancestors. Opened the Gates to the cities of the Otherworld. Poured out offerings, chanted, prayed.” – Morpheus Ravenna, on the foundations of the Coru Temple at PantheaCon 2014.

John Beckett

John Beckett

“The Temple of the Morrigan was an experience that couldn’t be found anywhere else at Pantheacon – not in rituals, not in workshops, not even next door talking with the Coru priests. Several participants said something along the lines of “I wish other groups would do this.”  Some traditions already have guidelines and rubrics for temples – it would be good to see and experience them.  Other traditions – particularly the newer Pagan traditions – have grown up in living rooms and back yards and public parks.  For those traditions, a temple at a gathering would be a chance to experiment with both structures and liturgies, to see what works well and what sounds good but really isn’t. Because some day we will have permanent temples. My gratitude to the Coru Cathubodua for their hard work in setting up the Temple of the Morrigan and for their hospitality.  Keeping the temple open meant someone had to be there all day (and not off playing at the con): answering questions, emptying offering bowls (there’s a tree beside the Doubletree hotel that should be feeling really really good for quite some time!) and making sure fresh bottles were available when needed. And my highest gratitude to the Gods, heroes and ancestors who filled the temple with their presence and who were there for me and for so many others. Thank you all.” – John Beckett, on his experiences of the Coru Temple.

Anomalous Thracian

Anomalous Thracian

“I don’t know what the conversations between the Coru priests and members were, as they planned for their Temple. I don’t know what their intentions were, from the start, nor if what they wound up with at the conference was indeed what they had set out to call into being. What I do know, however, is that every single fucking person who stepped into that space — shoes removed, body washed in sacred waters, knees bent in reverence as they entered — was graced with something entirely fucking different than the rest of the weekend could offer, and in most cases I would wager entirely fucking different than what could be brought into being in their own homes and shrine-rooms. There is a difference between a Temple and a shrine-room, between a “dedicated space” and a living, sentient and responsive Temple, which was big enough to contain all of the gods named and a thousand thousand left unnamed and all of the blessed and elevated dead and not a few wandering, misplaced souls (both of the corporeal variety and otherwise), which reverberated from inside with fucking majesty and authentic, lived and experienced divine grace. Others have described the Temple in more detail than I will, here, because I don’t really do descriptions. What I can do, however, is a humble, completely unworthy acknowledgement: what was done with that Temple, by the priests whose care and crafting brought it from possibility to awesome reality and by the gods and spirits who guided and guarded the process, was important.” – Anomalous Thracian, on the Coru Temple at PantheaCon 2014 (it seemed fitting to give three perspectives).

Rhyd Wildermuth

Rhyd Wildermuth

“One of the more common definitions of Paganism includes the notion that it is an “earth-based” or “nature-derived” spirituality.  Though this definition is sometimes problematic, it fits many of the traditions within Paganism quite well, particularly the one to which I’m most aligned: Druidry.  And as such, any arrangement of human activity which damages the earth should be critiqued by Paganism (I’d actually say “opposed”), and this leads to one of the reasons why I’d be writing it specifically from a Pagan perspective.  Paganism, whether or not it intends to be, functions as a political critique of society in the same way many indigenous religions do.  And that critique is largely anti-Capitalist, even when unstated or acknowledged. As such, we’ve got more in common with Queer- and Liberation- theologians, First Nations resistance movements, Anarchists, Socialists, and many other “leftist” movements than we’re always aware of, even if any particular person within Paganism might identify instead with pro-Capitalist economic stances (I’ve noted that a visible minority of ADF-aligned Druids, CR folks and Heathens identify as Libertarians, or “Anarcho-Capitalists,” at least on-line).” – Rhyd Wildermuth, on his intention to write a book about Capitalism (for Pagans).

Dr. Carole M. Cusack

Dr. Carole M. Cusack

“I first heard about Discordianism, for example, through students. Guy McCulloch did a presentation in an undergraduate unit on religious experience on the Principia Discordia, which I immediately purchased a copy of. After my marriage ended in 1992 I was involved for some time with Michael Usher, who had studied Crowleyan occultism for a time and presented me with a House of the Apostles of Eris ‘Pope’ card (that was the first direct contact I had with Australian Discordians). The interest I felt would have gone nowhere except for the help and support I received from Alex Norman (then a research assistant and PhD student). He and I have worked together for so long it’s hard to imagine that our two brains weren’t forever conjoined, and he convinced me to keep at it, to make it happen, to find methodological models that would enable sense to be made of such anarchic and irreverent materials, and I did. His impressive collective of Flying Spaghetti Monster t-shirts may have assisted, though that’s not certain! I’m proud and happy that Invented Religions has received eighteen published reviews, all of which are positive. I understand that some people, both ‘insiders’ of certain of the traditions examined (mostly Discordianism and the Church of the SubGenius) but also some esoterically-inclined scholars, have objected to my etic, outsider approach to these groups, but I can only riposte that a scholarly conversation can only occur when the preliminary documentation of the phenomena has been accomplished, and that’s what I was doing. I still love the book; it’s been the easiest thing I’ve ever written. And the funnest (and yes, I know that’s not a word).” – Dr. Carole M. Cusack, on Discordianism, the Church of the SubGenius, and other “invented” religions (which she wrote a scholarly examination of).

Taylor Ellwood

Taylor Ellwood

“I recently attended Convocation for the first time. I was having dinner one night at the restaurant and I talked with my waiter for a bit about the convention. She asked me if I thought that she and her co-worker would be accepted if they visited the vendor room to look around and I told her that I thought it would be fine (The vendor room was open to the public as far as I knew). I thought about that conversation later on and how in that moment I was a public face for Paganism. And how at any convention that is hosted in a space such as a hotel, all of us are public faces of Paganism, even if we don’t realize we are. The public space we are in is not solely a Pagan space. It is shared space and the impressions we make on the hotel staff and other guests matter. When I’m at an event or anywhere really, I behave the way I’d want other people to behave toward me. I’m courteous to the staff, acknowledge the work they are doing and do my best to be mindful of my behavior and how others might perceive it. Now it’s true that I’m at a convention to have fun, but  I also want to make a good impression because the staff and guests will come away from those experiences with their own perceptions about Pagans. And likely they’ll already have some assumptions and beliefs about us based on their own spiritual beliefs, etc. However I think that how we act in public is important.” – Taylor Ellwood, on how you are the public face of Paganism at conventions and public events.

Vivianne Crowley

Vivianne Crowley

“Beginning in 1979, over the next twenty years many books were written by a third generation that broadened the Craft in new directions. Starhawk’s feminist and earth-centered vision in The Spiral Dance: A Rebirth of the Ancient Religion of the Great Goddess inspired eco-activists and feminist witches. Scott Cunningham’sWicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner was an inspiration for those who could not or did not want to belong to a group. My book Wicca drew on my background in Jungian psychology to show how initiatory Wicca could be a path of spiritual growth and personal transformation. Phyllis Currot’s Book of Shadows, A Modern Woman’s Journey into the Wisdom of Witchcraft and the Magic of the Goddess inspired thousands of women to find spiritual fulfillment in contemporary witchcraft. Each generation has built on the next, evolving from the contributions of our predecessors on the path. When I wrote Wicca, I had been in Wicca for 15 years. What I had seen in that time was how Wicca had the potential to transform people. Many of the processes that I had seen occurring as people worked their way through the initiatory systems were those that manifest through the inner journey of growth that Carl Gustav Jung called ‘individuation’. By exposing our inner world to the Gods and to those who share the spiritual journey with us, we are transformed. This is not the matter of a few years, but a lifelong process, which initiatory Wicca at its best can nurture, support and foster. The purpose of such a journey is that of the Great Work – the transformation of self as a starting point for the transformation of humankind; for if individuals do not change, then societies cannot evolve. Our aim is to grow nearer the Gods, to move from our egocentric engagement with the world for our own ends, to a re-centering that detaches us from our own preoccupations and allows us the see the world from a wider, deeper, and longer-term perspective.” – Vivianne Crowley, on the “third generation” of books on Wicca, and her book, “Wicca: A Comprehensive Guide to the Old Religion in the Modern World” (now 25 years old).

That’s all I have for right now, have a great day!

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Jason Pitzl-Waters

Posts

  • Off the Back

    I’m going get my pound of flesh one way or another.

  • The_L1985

    Just reading about Coru Temple made me feel more at peace. I enjoy worshiping at the local UU church, and am thankful that CUUPS is around, but it’s not the same as having a dedicated Temple can be (and in the case of the Coru Temple, is).

  • http://www.cernowain.com/ cernowain greenman

    I listened to most of the Apocalyptic Witchcraft video, read the book reviews and still am not able to get a handle on all Peter Grey is saying. It’s poetry, symbolism and insights with an incredible depth you don’t find often. By “apocalyptic” I gather he means “unveiling”, an exposure of the heart of witchcraft in all its pulsating power. He believes this is a power that is capable of transforming the world when unleashed. It is appears to be an exceptional vision.

  • Elysia

    Well fuck. It sounds like I fucking missed the coolest fucking temple at PantheaCon!

  • http://blacknyx.tumblr.com/ BlackNyx

    Peter Grey has all the hallmarks of an attention seeker that loves the sound of his own ideas. All this focus on Witchcraft as something transgressive, subversive, ‘dark’, mysterious, and even something willfully spooky just seems so ridiculous. It’s like a teen angst reaction against Wicca. I think the mistake is in thinking that there is a ‘real’ Witchcraft to be revealed.