Unleash the Hounds! (Link Roundup)

Jason Pitzl-Waters —  January 30, 2014 — 22 Comments

There are lots of articles and essays of interest to modern Pagans out there, sometimes more than I can write about in-depth in any given week. So The Wild Hunt must unleash the hounds in order to round them all up.

Photo by: Jason T. Pitzl

Photo by: Jason T. Pitzl

  • What would a Millennial-created faith look like? According to a new Religion Dispatches piece major features would be “no Hell, no priests, no punishment.” Quote: “Most of the religions my class invented incorporated Eastern religious ideas like meditation— especially meditation used for psychological growth or personal fulfillment—as well as ideas like reincarnation and karma. When Western religions were included, the pieces taken from them were such things as pilgrimage, like the hajj to Mecca required by Muslims, or rituals like prayer. But the prayer was of a particular stripe, always centering on personal—or even material—enrichment. There were several components of religion that were glaringly absent. Not one of them had career clergy who were in charge of services, rituals, or care of the congregation. There were, for the most part, no regular meetings of the faithful. Some had monthly or annual gatherings, like conferences, but most were very individualized religions, centering on personal growth and enrichment away from a physical community.” Boy, that sounds really familiar, but I just can’t place my finger on it…
  • Thanks to reality star Wiccan Carlton Gebbia, the Psychic Eye Book Shop in California just got thousands in free publicity. Quote: “Want to delve into Wicca like Carlton Gebbia? Now we know just the place to send you to! The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star was spotted stocking up on supplies during an afternoon outing on January 29. The 40-year-old designer was photographed browsing her way through the Psychic Eye Bookshop, where she picked up some incense and what appeared to be books.” I can see Psychic Eye’s new tagline now: “we sell incense and what appears to be books.”
  • Some Christians are totally OK with a Satanic statue being erected on the Oklahoma capitol lawn. Quote: “The leader of a Satanic temple said he has been touched by the support his group has received for its proposal to place a monument next to the Ten Commandments at the Oklahoma State Capitol. “It’s really encouraging. It’s really moving. We do get a lot of messages that start out with the caveat, ‘You know I am a Christian.’ However, and they explain that they appreciate what we’re doing,” Lucien Greaves, a spokesperson for the Satanic Temple, told KWTV.” Tell you what, I’ll totally support a multi-faith public square if all Christian monuments are automatically balanced with a mandatory Satanic monument. How does that sound?
  • Cultural conservative were not fond of the Grammys! I am shocked, shocked. Quote: “Conservative commentator Erik Rush admitted he didn’t actually watch the Grammy Awards last night, but still observed that the ‘Same Love’ performance ‘makes you want to vomit.’ Rush said the performance was led by ‘a disgusting pack of subverts’ who want America ‘shepherded down the path to Hell.'” Meanwhile, Grammy officials were gratified to hear that someone still thinks they’re culturally relevant.
  • Some Papal blood was stolen recently, but it probably wasn’t Satanists. Quote: “But what would someone do with the stolen relic? Irwin said in centuries past, relics were regularly stolen to give influence to a community. But in today’s globally flat world, could a town, no matter how remote, keep secret such an item? ‘Who is going to ‘fess up to stealing this?’ Irwin said. ‘My hope upon hope is it’s being used to venerate.'” Seriously folks, probably not Satanists.

  • So the Katy Perry performance at the 2014 Grammys was something that happened. Apparently some folks are offended, so I guess mission accomplished? Personally, I’ve seen more shocking stuff at Midwestern goth club nights. This was one step up from Disney’s Haunted Mansion… maybe.
  • Hey, love the idea of blasphemy laws? Move to Pakistan where terrible things can happen to you if you belong to the wrong faith. Quote: “Pakistan’s blasphemy law is increasingly becoming a potent weapon in the arsenal of Muslim extremists. Although Pakistan has never executed anybody under the law, vigilantes frequently entrap and sometimes kill adherents of minority religions accused of blasphemy. They have created a climate of fear, forcing frightened judges into holding court sessions inside jails and keeping witnesses from coming to the defense of those on trial.” Separation of Church and State may not be a perfect system, but I’ll take it over just about anything else out there.
  • A man in New York killed his girlfriend and her daughter, clutching a Bible, claiming they were “witches.” Quote: “A hammer-wielding madman found clutching a bible after allegedly bludgeoning his girlfriend and her daughter to death in their Queens home because he believed they were “witches” who were casting spells on him, authorities said on Wednesday.” 
  • The Chicago Reader profiles local Wiccan Marty Couch. Quote: “If I ever write a book, it’s going to be called Free and Cheap Wicca, because it’s a religion that people can spend a lot of money on. You can buy everything from robes to crystals to cauldrons—all these things people think are going to make everything that much more magical—and for the most part, they’re just making revenue for the source. You don’t need to buy anything at all. The god and goddess are everywhere.”
  • Scholars have discovered new poems by ancient Greek poetess Sappho. Quote: “The two poems came to light when the owner of an ancient papyrus, dating to the 3rd century A.D., consulted an Oxford classicist, Dirk Obbink, about the Greek writing on the tattered scrap. Dr. Obbink, a MacArthur fellow and world-renowned papyrologist, quickly realized the importance of what the papyrus contained and asked its owner for permission to publish it. His article, which includes a transcription of the fragmentary poems, will appear in a scholarly journal this spring, but an on-line version has already been released.”

That’s it for now! Feel free to discuss any of these links in the comments, some of these I may expand into longer posts as needed.

Jason Pitzl-Waters

Posts