(Pagan) Books to Look For: Raven Grimassi, Brendan Myers, Christine Hoff Kraemer, and More!

Jason Pitzl-Waters —  September 6, 2013 — 9 Comments

With all apologies to Charles de Lint for borrowing his column’s title, here are some recently released and upcoming books that I think readers of The Wild Hunt will be interested in checking out.

facing_the_darkness“Facing the Darkness” by Cat Treadwell: We all face times of crisis and depression in our lives, and Druid Priest Cat Treadwell shares her strategies for supporting Pagans (and others) on their healing path(s). Quote: “Facing the Darkness aims to support those going through times of crisis and depression – primarily Pagan, but accessible to all. Utilizing Pagan spiritual imagery, skills and perspectives, a combination of inspirational text and easy exercises work with images and stories to distract and encourage for short-term relief and long-term healing. From the apparent hopelessness of deep night through to the inevitable return of sunrise, Nature imagery, tales of mythology and Deity combine in accessible meditations, activities and anecdotes to remind the reader that they are not alone on their path through the darkness. Cat Treadwell acts as a guide through the forest, working with the Druid skills of Bardic tales and Ovatic land/spirit connection. Darkness and despair can lead to peace and inspiration…through the simple bravery of stepping forward.” There aren’t many books aimed at Pagans that tackle the issue of depression, so this seems like it would be a much needed addition to many Pagan bookshelves, particularly clergy. “Facing the Darkness” will be released on October 7th, 2013.

The Life of Margaret Alice Murray A Woman’s Work in Archaeology “The Life of Margaret Alice Murray: A Woman’s Work in Archaeology” by Kathleen L. Sheppard: Released the beginning of August, Sheppard’s biography of Margaret Murry, an accomplished Egyptologist-turned-folklorist who helped develop and popularize the “Witch-Cult Hypothesis,” is the first of its kind.  Quote: “This book analyzes the life and career of Margaret Alice Murray as a teacher, excavator, scholar, and popularizer of Egyptology, archaeology, anthropology, linguistics, and more. Sheppard also analyzes areas outside of Murray’s archaeology career, including her involvement in the suffrage movement, her work in folklore and witchcraft studies, and her life after her official retirement from University College London (UCL).” Sadly, the book doesn’t seem to give too much attention to Murray’s work on the Witch-Cult Hypothesis (a scant 30 pages), and titles the chapter “The Witch-Cult Hypothesis and Other Adventures on theLunatic Fringe, 1911–1935,” so you have some idea of where Sheppard stands on the subject.  That’s too bad, as Murray’s work, while largely discredited, and now seen as an embarrassment by many British folklorists, did have a large effect on the early development of modern Paganism and religious Witchcraft. Still, this might be a good book to read for a deeper understanding of Murray’s life and work, and will no doubt be valuable to scholars digging into how her work shaped the imagination of her generation. It’s pricey, so a library request might be the way to go on this one. Out now.

jhp51efa580a1aaf“The Earth, The Gods and The Soul – A History of Pagan Philosophy: From the Iron Age to the 21st Century” by Brendan Myers: Pagan author and professor of philosophy Brendan Myers has written several well-regarded books on topics ranging from virtue to loneliness, greatly enriching the depth of Pagan-oriented literature. Now, he returns with a history of Pagan philosophy. Quote: “Philosophy was invented by pagans. Yet this fact is almost always ignored by those who write the history of ideas. This book tells the history of the pagan philosophers, and the various places where their ideas appeared, from ancient times to the 21st century. The Pagan philosophers are a surprisingly diverse group: from kings of great empires to exiled lonely wanderers, from devout religious teachers to con artists, drug addicts, and social radicals. Three traditions of thought emerge from their work: Pantheism, NeoPlatonism, and Humanism, corresponding to the immensities of the Earth, the Gods, and the Soul. From ancient schools like the Stoics and the Druids, to modern feminists and deep ecologists, the pagan philosophers examined these three immensities with systematic critical reason, and sometimes with poetry and mystical vision. This book tells their story for the first time in one volume, and invites you to examine the immensities with them.” The book has already earned advance praise from thinkers like Gus DiZerega, Ronald Hutton, and Phillip Carr Gomm, and I’m very much looking forward to reading it myself. Out November 7th, 2013.

Kraemer-Eros-Touch-cover“Eros and Touch from a Pagan Perspective: Divided for Love’s Sake” by Christine Hoff Kraemer: Scholar, Patheos Pagan Channel manager, and author of the quickly becoming essential introductory text “Seeking the Mystery: An Introduction to Pagan Theologies,” Christine Hoff Kraemer returns with an academic exploration of “the sacredness of the body and of touch.” Quote: “Within the past twenty years, contemporary Pagan leaders, progressive Christian and Goddess theologians, advocates for queer and BDSM communities, and therapeutic bodyworkers have all begun to speak forcefully about the sacredness of the body and of touch. Many assert that the erotic is a divinely transformative force, both for personal development and for social change. Although “the erotic” includes sexuality, it is not limited to it; access to connected nonsexual touch is as profound a need as that for sexual freedom and health. In this book, Christine Hoff Kraemer brings together an academic background in religious studies and theology with lived experience as a professional bodyworker and contemporary Pagan practitioner. Arguing that the erotic is a powerful moral force that can ground a system of ethics, Kraemer integrates approaches from queer theology, therapeutic bodywork, and sexual minority advocacy into a contemporary Pagan religious framework. Addressing itself to liberal religious people of many faiths, Eros and Touch from a Pagan Perspective approaches the right to pleasure as a social justice issue and proposes a sacramental practice of mindful, consensual touch.” The hardcover for the book is out October 21st, 2013, but sadly at an institutional price-point that will make it too expensive for most casual readers. However, I spoke with Kraemer, and she said that if the hardcover does well enough, a cheaper paperback edition will be released. Lets hope that happens!

9781578635436“Horns of Honor: Regaining the Spirit of the Pagan Horned God” by Fredrick Thomas Elworthy (Author) and Raven Grimassi (Editor): “Horns of Honor” is not a new book, indeed, it was first published in 1900 (and in the public domain). However, this classic text on the folklore of horns has found many Pagan fans over the years and noted Pagan author Raven Grimassi steps forward to re-contextualize it for a new generation of readers. Quote: “For the modern Pagan and Witchcraft community, horns play a major role as a symbol of fertility, power, and protection and yet there are few books that discuss the significance in a way that makes sense to a practicing Pagan. In Horns of Honor, neo-pagan scholar and award-winning author Raven Grimassi updates one of the few classic texts on horns, Frederick Thomas Elworthy’s classic 1900 text, Horns of Honor. Grimassi has added a new introduction, footnotes, and commentary to make this extensive overview of animal horns in cultures across time, accessible to the Pagan community. Horns of Honor examines the religious and ritualistic significanc of horns in many cultures, the ancient reverence for horned gods, and the horn as a positive symbol. This revived classic is sure to be welcomed by all in the Pagan community.” This book will be released on October 1st, 2013.

Do you know of some recently released or upcoming books that should be spotlighted here? Leave a comment or drop us a line and it may be featured in a future edition of this series. You can find previous installments of this series, here. Happy reading!

Send to Kindle

Jason Pitzl-Waters

Posts

  • http://www.patheos.com/Pagan Christine Kraemer

    Thanks so much for the mention of Eros and Touch from a Pagan Perspective, Jason! This first edition is indeed the “library” edition, and I hope interested readers (especially with university connections) will ask their libraries to buy it. I’ll also be making some substantial excerpts available through Academia.edu and offering some review copies — so hopefully non-academic readers will be able to get some benefit even while we’re waiting on the softcover.

  • http://egregores.blogspot.com Apuleius Platonicus

    Like a lot of people I am really looking forward to “Horns of Honor”! There is an awful lot of misinformation circulating in Pagandom when it comes to Horned Gods. In particular, for some reason many people have become convinced that the Horned Gods of modern Paganism are completely unrelated to the ancient Gods Pan, Sylvanus, Cernunnos, and Faunus. In fact, these Gods represent one of the strongest links between modern and ancient Paganism!

  • Luminous_Being

    I was just talking to someone about Margaret Murray and how sad it is that no one really has much to say about her anymore. Whether or not her theories about Witch Cults were true, many founders of modern paganism certainly thought they might be and it it’s an important part of our story.

  • Hecate_Demetersdatter

    Wow, so many books; so little time! In terms of future books to highlight, Judith Laura has recently released audio recordings of the meditations from some of her books. Medusa Coils listed them, I think.

  • Brendan Myers

    Thank you for mentioning my book!

  • Lyradora

    Well, Bibliotheca Alexandrina has a Pagan fantasy anthology, “Beyond the Pillars,” due out later this month. And “Queen of Olympos,” our devotional for Hera, is due in October. :)

    http://neosalexandria.org/bibliotheca-alexandrina/forthcoming-titles/

    • http://www.wildhunt.org/blog/ Jason Pitzl-Waters

      Thank you for the heads up! I’ll be sure to include Bibliotheca Alexandrina releases in my next Books to Look For round up!

  • Deborah Bender

    I hope you will make the books of interest roundup a regular feature of this blog.

    • harmonyfb

      Yes, please!