UK Pagans React to Same Sex Marriage Legalization

Jason Pitzl-Waters —  July 20, 2013 — 12 Comments

This week a law was passed that will make same-sex marriage legal in England and Wales. The landmark legislation, approved by Queen Elizabeth II, clears the way for legal marriages to start in 2014. The way the new law is structured, religious organizations must “opt in” in order to perform a legally binding ceremony. This historic move follows recent advances for same-sex marriage in parts of the United States and for all of France. Just as I collected reactions from modern Pagans in America following the DOMA/Prop 8 Supreme Court decisions, so too did I want to see how Pagans in England and Wales felt about this development.

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Mike Stygal, President of the Pagan Federation, celebrated the “wonderful development,” though pointed out that inequalities remained.

Mike Stygal

Mike Stygal

“Finally the Marriage Act (same sex) has made it through all the hoops our political system presents. This wonderful development is the result of many, many years of persistent effort to secure equality for the LGBT community. There are still inequalities towards LGBT that will need to be challenged and that will require persistent effort to overcome. There are still inequalities with regard to spirituality and faith too. The Pagan Federation is no stranger to persistent effort to challenge and change inequalities and we know just how hard it is to achieve success. Congratulations to all those people who kept at the cause of legal same sex marriage, and to all those who challenge inequality, take heart that inequality can be beaten.”

Yvonne Aburrow, a Pagan from Oxford who also writes for the Patheos blog Sermons From The Mound, noted that Pagans in England and Wales cannot perform legal wedding ceremonies of any kind (which became a point of contention in the lead-up to this law being passed), though was still “delighted” over this advance for marriage equality in the UK.

Yvonne Aburrow

Yvonne Aburrow

“I am delighted that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people can now marry someone of the same sex in England and Wales, and that some religious groups will be able to marry same-sex couples in their places of worship. Unitarians, Quakers, and Liberal Jews campaigned particularly hard on this, and Derek McAuley, Unitarian Chief Officer, Paul Parker (Recording Clerk, Quaker Yearly Meeting), and Rabbi Danny Rich, should be applauded for their lobbying efforts. It is a shame that Pagans in England and Wales are unable to marry either opposite-sex or same-sex couples in a legal ceremony, but it looks as if the House of Lords have left open the possibility of humanist weddings, and weddings for other religions too.”

Aburrow added that her optimism was “cautious” and that “tomorrow, we keep fighting for LGBT rights around the world, and for human rights generally. Until it is safe everywhere to be Black, disabled, LGBT, a woman, or a member of a religious minority, then our work is not yet done.”

Like Aburrow and Stygal, Sophia Catherine of the Divine Community podcast brought up the fact that Pagan weddings can still only be symbolic in nature, and not legally binding, but also raised true gender equality as a primary concern.

“My one sadness about this Act is that, initially, it was to be called the Equal Marriage Act, but the name was changed to make it clear that ‘same-sex’ marriage was involved. There are more than two genders, and that the Act upholds the gender binary that society is obsessed with. However, this Act does take a step forward, in that regard, Under the Gender Recognition Act 2004, for mixed-sex married couples where one member changed their legal sex, the couple had to divorce and obtain a civil partnership. Now that marriage is available to all regardless of sex/gender, this will no longer be the case. It is a shame that couples who were forced to go through this process will not automatically regain their marriages, but they will be able to ‘convert’ these civil partnerships back into marriages. Of course, this does not make up for the indignity of what they had to go through, but in the future, this won’t happen to any more couples where one changes their legal sex.”

Vivianne Crowley, author, Jungian psychologist, and faculty at Cherry Hill Seminary, is currently in Paris, and gave a broad perspective informed by France’s recent legalization of same-sex marriages.

Vivianne Crowley

Vivianne Crowley

“The last three centuries have seen in western culture a shift towards recognition of the autonomy of the individual and the right to freedom of self-expression. It is a tide that dictators and others have sought to suppress. It has been subverted – sometimes the tide has turned; but slowly consciousness has undergone a shift.

Major social changes occur when almost unconsciously the greater mass of people sense that an idea is self-evidently right. At first, such evolutions of thought are the preoccupation of a few who are ahead of the zeitgeist. In the late eighteenth century and nineteenth centuries, recognition of the unique value of each individual led inevitably to the abolition of slavery in Europe and the United States. The political impetus that overthrew absolute monarchs led to democracy and the recognition that every adult male should have the right to vote for who should rule his country. In the twentieth century, an inexorable tide saw that right extend to women. Now the west is ready for a new right – the right of individuals to choose to marry their life partner regardless of gender and to make a public commitment that is recognized and honored by the state.

The Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, Canada and South Africa, among others, set the trend. Now the United Kingdom and France have followed almost simultaneously and other European countries will do the same.

Here, in France, Catholics marched against same-sex marriage, but the law has been swiftly passed. July 14th is Bastille Day, France’s equivalent of the 4th of July – a celebration of revolution past and national identity present. There are major celebrations in all French towns, and particularly of course in Paris. This July 14th the iconic Eiffel Tower was lit up with rainbow colors and songs filled the Paris night sky, celebrating equal marriage rights for all.

Where Canada and Europe can go, other nations can go too. But in the meantime, Vive la France –liberté, égalité, fraternité! And well done, Britain!”

Perhaps the most succinct response that encapsulates many of the recurring themes heard from UK Pagans on marriage equality is from Cat Treadwell, a Trustee of The Druid Network, and ordained Awenydd (Priest) of The Anglesey Druid Order.

“Consenting adults have loved each other for centuries, with or without permission, and will no doubt continue to do so; the law slowly moves forward to accommodate this. We can only hope that as society becomes more accepting, Pagan unions will also be recognised in our own lifetimes.”

Let us hope that society continues to move forward on accepting the simple reality of consenting adults loving each other, and that the desire for modern Pagan clergy in England and Wales to perform legally recognized unions within that tapestry of love is soon realized.

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Jason Pitzl-Waters

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  • Lēoht Sceadusawol

    I will echo Yvonne Aburrow. I’m not seeing anything to cheer about until they start recognising Pagan/Heathen marriages as legal.

    I doubt that will happen any time soon, however.

    • kenneth

      Why so difficult there? I know you don’t have a codified First Amendment and do have a state official religion, but I was always under the impression that you don’t have a political culture overrun by evangelical loonies the way we do. Is it part of the problem pagan groups have had getting tax exemption over there?

      • Lēoht Sceadusawol

        Our government is divided into two houses – The commons and the Lords.

        The commons are the ‘elected’ politicians, whereas the Lords are appointed. Within the Lords, there are the Lords Spiritual. These are Anglican Bishops inserted into the government by the Church of England (of who our head of state is supreme governor.)

        We may not have the evangeloonies that the US seems to have, but we are a Christian country.

        It doesn’t help that our societal model has issues with the lack of organisational structure that Paganism suffers from.

  • Castus

    I’m disappointed in Her Majesty. I know that Anglicanism has fallen pretty low as far as gays go; but I still feel her office as Head of the Church and Defender of the Faith should have precluded Royal Assent. True, not giving it could have sparked a serious constitutional crisis but I am disappointed all the rest.

  • Elizabeth C.

    I am happy to see this step forward. I’m fully in support of same-sex marriages. I’m sad, however, the the QoE still has anything to say about what other countries, like Wales, or the North of Ireland fer instance, must or should do.

    • Lēoht Sceadusawol

      She is the Queen of the United Kingdom, not just England. (Also head of the Commonwealth.)

  • Paul w Hawkins

    Though it is everyones right to be happy, the sacred marriage that only a High Priestess or other may coduct, “the original hand-fasting” is for a man and a woman.

    • http://www.wildhunt.org/blog/ Jason Pitzl-Waters

      [citation needed]

  • FluffyPinkDragon

    I’m a little baffled here. No religious marriage outside of the Church of England, and that includes RC, Jewish, Muslim, and all the other Christian Churches, are legally binding. That’s why you have to have a Registrar present to make it legal. We are no different to anyone else.

    • Lēoht Sceadusawol

      Doesn’t mean we have to like that inequality.

  • epredota

    Just wanted to remind everyone that in Scotland, Pagan marriages are legal, as here it is the celebrant who is registered, not the place of worship.

    The Pagan Federation, Scotland holds a register of celebrants ( http://www.scottishpf.org/celebrants.html ), refreshed annually, which is then approved by the General Register Office of Scotland for the solemnisation of marriages.

    Sadly, though, we in Scotland are behind England and Wales in regard to same-sex marriage, and the passing of the legislation is by no means the foregone conclusion that it should be, but I remain hopeful.

    • Lēoht Sceadusawol

      It would be great to see the rest of the union adopt the Scottish model of registration for wedding officiation.