Guest Post: Interview with John Matthews on The Wildwood Tarot

Jason Pitzl-Waters —  July 15, 2012 — 6 Comments

[The following is a guest interview with John Matthews, author of “The Sidhe: Wisdom from the Celtic Otherworld” and 90 other books, co-creator of The Wildwood Tarot.  Matthews and fellow Wildwood Tarot co-creator Mark Ryan, who played “Nasir” on Robin of Sherwood, will be appearing in Atlanta, Georgia this November to conduct a workshop. The interview was conducted by Virginia Chandler, with an introduction written by John Matthews.]

For many people today, the woodlands are the last vestiges of the mystical world in which we had our beginning. Such places are full of classic archetypes from Robin Hood to the shadowy figures of the Green Man and Woman. To walk in the wild wood is to take a journey back in time to a place where we, ourselves, are different; a place where deep ancestral wisdom still resides; a place where a partnership with the denizens of the wild wood is as natural as breathing.

Based on the seasonal rhythms and festivals of the ancient year, The Wildwood Tarot is filled with the rich mythology and shamanic mysteries of the ancient Celts. Deep within the Wildwood system lies the mystical archetypes of The Green Man, The Blasted Oak, the Archer and the Hooded Man and many others of forest lore.

The archetypal forces of the pack act as both guides and interpreters, taking the user on a spiritual, mystical and psychological journey deep into the labyrinth of primal Earth mysteries. Used as a meditation system, divinatory Oracle, or as a reference work for the seeker of profound knowledge, The Wildwood Tarot will draw you into the heart of the ancient forest and allow you to open up to its mysteries.

Will Worthington, Mark Ryan, and John Matthews

Will Worthington, Mark Ryan, and John Matthews (Wildwood Tarot launch party)

Virginia Chandler: What was your personal inspiration for creating The Wildwood Tarot?

John Matthews: I think the inspiration is really Mark Ryan, because he was the only begetter of The Greenwood Tarot, on which Wildwood is very firmly based. I came along 10 years later. I’d hoped that the original deck would be reprinted, but when it became evident that the original artist, Chesca Potter, was not around to do this, I suggested that Mark should look for another artist and redo it that way. As we talked about this I made a few suggestions of ways that the original concept seemed incomplete and Mark responded by suggesting that he and I collaborate on a new version. The result was The Wildwood Tarot, but I find Mark a very inspiring person to work with. We’ve been friends for 20 odd years and share a lot of interests in common. And of course we were fortunate to secure the services of one of the premier artists of our time, Will Worthington, who understands the nature of the Wildwood and the Robin Hood mythos which is part of it, better than almost anyone else I know of.

VC: What can we find within the Wildwood?

JM: All kinds of wildness and wonder. The medieval ideas of the “wild wood” was like a cupboard into which they stuffed everything they were afraid of – Wodwose, Green Men, demons, strange creatures – and of course the most fearful thing of all- wild women and their sexuality!

VC: As journeymen, what would be the one item that we must take with us into the Wildwood?

JM: Courage.

VC: Where should we seek the Wildwood?

JM: The wildwood is everywhere. It’s inside us. It’s outside us. And, of course, if you happen to be near any of the more ancient forests, not just in Europe; then, you are in touch with the source itself. But for me, it’s about journeying into an inner landscape that is deeply embedded within us. We have a wild nature that most of us have forgotten, but it’s there. And it’s both light and dark. There are ancient atavistic things that need to be approached with care. But even these, if faced up to, can bring blessings.

VC: What is the archetype that you most closely identity with from the Wildwood Tarot?

JM: I have to say I think it’s the Archer. There is something about this powerful image and the sense of direction, of one pointedness and determination. Although we portray the Archer as female in the pock, it can be of either gender.

VC: The Wildwood Tarot is in its third printing; why do you think that this deck resonates with so many people?

JM: Precisely because it touches into a very deep level to the primal energy that still drives us. We may think of ourselves as civilized, but there is always a wildness within.

VC: Why “Wildwood “? What’ so “wild” about it?

JM: I think it’s the freedom, the undisciplined energy that’s within us all – exactly what you feel when you enter the wild anywhere, or if you let your garden grow wild. Even if most of us don’t want to admit it, there’s a memory latent that grabs people in a profound way.

VC: What is the air speed velocity of an unladen swallow?

JM: (laugh) Twice what you think it is.

VC: Do you have a favorite card or piece of artwork from the deck?

JM: Either The Archer or The Great Bear. Both, it seems to me, really captures the energy of the Wildwood. But to be honest I love them all.

VC: Other than your upcoming visit to Atlanta in November, what other Wild events do you have planned for 2012?

JM: Well, we hope to continue circling the globe with as many workshops and seminars and book signings as possible – until our global empire is greater than any other and we can take over the world. At the moment, Caitlín and I are contemplating a special event here, in the UK, around Christmas next year at the amazing and legendary Hawkwood College. This will bring together all the many decks we have worked on over the years – one of which will, of course, be The Wildwood Tarot.

More Information on The Wild Wood Tarot.

More Information on the The Atlanta Wildwood Weekend and Signing.

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Jason Pitzl-Waters

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  • Hecatedemetersdatter

    I love the Wildwood Tarot and have used it for my Conversations with Columbia series of posts: http://hecatedemeter.wordpress.com/2012/07/04/goddess-emergent/

  • Mia

    +1 for the Holy Grail reference.

    I don’t even use tarot anymore and I still want the Wildwood deck. Mainly for that card of the deer goddess. I think it’s called the ancestor?

  • Tara

    Thanks for this.

  • Patrick Burke

    It’s a lovely deck, but the cards feel cheap. I wish they’d do a nice oversized, glossy version.

  • thistleinavalon

    I get goosebumps almost every time I pull out this deck. The Seer is one of my favorite cards in it, but each is powerful in its own way. And Will Worthington is my favorite deck illustrator, so that’s a bonus! Thanks for providing this interview. 

    As for the cards, I know some people like the bigger cards, but I prefer them this size as they are much easier to handle. 

  • Ursyl

    Good to read in the comments that these cards are a more easily handled size. I do not get the attraction of larger cards that cannot be held and shuffled easily, but then I see the same concept in playing card decks for young children. While making a crayon thicker does make it easier to hold (for all of us), making cards larger accomplishes the opposite.

    I happily followed the links in this article, and learned something wonderful.There’s an app for this!  I wasn’t sure if I really wanted this deck or not. It’s not like my Robin Wood deck and my Celtic Messages deck aren’t good and useful, and just how many decks does one person need?  Now I know for certain that I want this in a physical deck as well. the artwork really speaks to me. There are BEARS here. And I don’t have to translate anything from Abrahamic assumptions. That right there is huge.Have to say that despite being told that you need a physical deck for a good accurate reading, the general reading I did for myself this morning was very reflective of my life, perhaps disturbingly so considering the “end of the story” card.  But then, that there are endings and mourning in life is a given.