Quick Notes: Fiat LVX, Fort Bragg Open Circle, and the Young Witches of Salem

Jason Pitzl-Waters —  October 1, 2011 — 9 Comments

Just a few quick news notes for your Saturday.

Thorn Coyle Launches New Video Series: Pagan author and mentor T. Thorn Coyle has announced the launch of a new subscription video teaching series entitled Fiat LVX. For $20 dollars per month subscribers will have access to two professionally produced instructional and informational videos featuring T. Thorn Coyle each month.

“The first installment will examine a different spiritual idea as it directly relates to our lives; the second video will guide you through the steps of putting that concept into direct experience. A forum led by Morningstar Mentors and Thorn will enable you to ask questions, delve into your experience with other participants, and hopefully inspire us all to keep practicing! Twice monthly practice prompts will support and further the work.

Topics include: Becoming the priestess, able to mediate the space between the Twin Pillars of yes and no, push and pull, light and dark. The power of Integrative Magick that enables us to bring all parts of life to bear on our great work. Aligning the parts of our soul, connecting our animal, human, and divine natures. The series will grow and expand over time, facilitating our own growth and expansion.”

Funds raised through Fiat LVX will go into covering production costs, with any remainder being funneled into the non-profit Pagan organization Solar Cross. While there have been Pagan instructional videos in the past, and a growing number of Pagans are utilizing Internet video and communication services to conduct classes, I believe this is a unique service, particularly considering the professional production values.

Ten Years of Fort Bragg Open Circle: Today, Fort Bragg Open Circle, one of the longest-running Pagan military groups in the United States, celebrates its 10th anniversary. Attending and speaking at the event is Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary, who had this to say about this milestone in the group’s history.

Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary

Selena Fox of Circle Sanctuary

“The Fort Bragg Open Circle is one of the oldest and longest running Pagan military groups in the United States of America. Also known by its original name, Bragg Pope Open Circle, it has been providing ceremonies, education, and other support for Pagans at Fort Bragg since its founding in 2001. It was among the Pagan military groups that took part in the successful quest to have the US Department of Veterans Affairs add the pentacle to its list of emblems of belief that can be included on veteran gravemarkers. I look forward to being part of the Fort Bragg Open Circle’s 10th Anniversary activities on Saturday and celebrating this milestone for this group — and for Paganism as a whole!”

The Fort Bragg Open Circle was formed not long after some conservative politicians, specifically former Georgia Rep. Bob Barr,  tried to institute a ban on modern Pagans in the military. That uproar in 1999 would echo for another decade, denying military Pagans the full honor and respect they deserve. So here’s to the Fort Bragg Open Circle for standing up and being out during a time when it truly was risky to do so. Congratulations on your 10th anniversary!

The Young Witches of Salem: Tonight sees the premiere of “The Young Witches of Salem,” a reality web series produced by Ed Hubbard of Witch School that follows a group of young Witches living in Salem, Massachusetts during the city’s busiest month of the year.

“October 1st, 2011 With the cool fall winds of fall and we enter the month of October, America turns to Halloween, seeking out fun and entertainment. Starting Saturday Night, October 1st, the world will be able to visit the Halloween Capital of the World, Salem, Massachusetts, aka The Witch City and follow the exploits of real live Witches during the Haunted Happenings Season. The Young Witches of Salem will begin broadcasting their own web series and sharing their lives as part of the season. The series will follow The Young Witches Lexi Renee, Caitlin Rose, Peter Murphy and Danielle Young as they learn their craft from Salem leaders and Witch Elders, while dealing with the daily reality of their jobs, school, and personal lives. They are inviting the world to become part of the celebration known as Haunted Happenings, as seen through their eyes.

The cast members are not actors, but real members of the Witch community, a community that extends far beyond Salem itself, and they each have a different way of looking at the world. The web series will allow each of the Young Witches to have their individual voice and will allow the audience to have a voice as well with the inclusion of interactive video.”

I believe all the videos in this series will be posted to the MagickTV Youtube account for those who’d like to follow it there. It should be interesting to see how this develops, and who gets involved. Good luck to the Young Witches!

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

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Jason Pitzl-Waters

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  • Tara

    I think the Young Witches website needs an editor.
    From the website: “For Witches, Pagans, and true seekers, to seek a path and a path that takes you into a adventurous life.”

    • Anonymous

      Seriously.

    • http://www.facebook.com/kkampmiller Kat Kampmiller

      Hilarious. Oh Ed Hubbard.. Wasn’t he the guy who did Witchschool in a small midwest town and had to leave because people were, predictably, assholes to them?

      • Kelly NicDruegan

        That was Don Lewis in the center of that mess out in Illinois. I don’t know if Ed was involved back then or not until after Lewis moved his operations out here to Salem and opened the World of Witches Museum

        • http://www.facebook.com/kkampmiller Kat Kampmiller

          http://www.correllian.com/edhubbard.htm He was involved, I just had to look it up. I knew his name was familiar. :)

          • http://www.facebook.com/EdAHubbard Ed Hubbard

            Absolutely, It was Don Lewis home county, where he was born and raised. We did not move in, as so much returning home. The fact we did so publicly, was the problem and we fought well for seven years. It was a inherent rights question, and that was “Do we as Pagans have a right to live openly wherever we choose?”.

          • Charles Cosimano

            We had good friends who would go down to Hoopland or whatever it was called on a regular basis and while I had a lot of fun with the tradition’s name, it was a worthwhile effort and a good lesson. If you are going to make a fight for your rights, you need to go in with heavy legal artillery and the funding to use it.

          • http://www.facebook.com/kkampmiller Kat Kampmiller

            Absolutely any pagan should be allowed to live openly wherever they choose. However, living among religious country folks myself for some of my life, I learned sometimes you have to be selective about who you come out to.

  • http://www.magickal-media.com Alice C. “A.C.” Fisher Aldag

    I disagree with Charles Cosimano but ran out of room for replies. If you’re gonna try to get along with midwesterners, be friendly and nice, rather than going in with guns blazing. If the “powers that be” are hostile, then it’s time to bring out the legal big guns. IF you have the time, money, and inclination.

    Sometimes it’s easier to retreat to higher ground, as Witch School chose to do, and keep working from there. Suing people is very hard work.

    I applaud both T. Thorne Coyle’s videos and Witch School’s reality program. There is lots of room for everyone — Pagan media has only begun to scratch the surface.