Pagan Community Notes: International Pagan Coming Out Day, Who’s Pagan, The Correllian Tradition, and more!

Jason Pitzl-Waters —  April 26, 2011 — 72 Comments

Pagan Community Notes is a companion to my usual Pagan News of Note, a series more focused on news originating from within the Pagan community. I want to reinforce the idea that what happens to and within our organizations, groups, and events is news, and news-worthy. My hope is that more individuals, especially those working within Pagan organizations, get into the habit of sharing their news with the world. So lets get started!

International Pagan Coming Out Day: It is less than a week to Pagan Coming Out Day, May 2nd, and PNC-Minnesota has a story up about a local IPCOD celebration that will feature a screening of the documentary “American Mystic”.

The event takes place May 2nd at the Sacred Paths Center and is open to all Pagans and Pagan allies, no matter if you have been ‘out’ for ages or are not yet able to be open about your Pagan spirituality.  It directly follows the usual Monday night Pagan Potluck and the event is offered as a free gift to the community.  An opening Hellenic-style libation to Hestia, a Goddess that strengthens the bonds of family and community,  kicks off the evening, with champagne cocktails, non-alcoholic drinks and desserts to follow.  Once everyone has their treats, the movie American Mystic will be screened for the first time in the Twin Cities area.  The documentary opened at Pantheacon to rave reviews.”

Meanwhile, David Salisbury at PNC-Washington DC/Capital Witch mentions the DC-area IPCOD event sponsored by the Open Hearth Foundation.

“Sponsoring DC’s event is the Open Hearth Foundation who just announced that our location will be at the back gates of the White House. Really, if you’re going to come out as anything, it might as well be right on the President’s doorstep! Participants should gather at the sidewalk area in front of the White House on Pennsylvania Avenue at 7:45pm. A public coming out ritual will being at 8:00pm, followed by walking to a local restaurant for community sharing and celebration. In addition to the gathering itself, the OHF will also have support volunteers on-site to help those who might find the coming out process difficult or emotional.”

You can see a full list of scheduled IPCOD celebrations, here. Follow IPCOD on Facebook, here. In the interest of full disclosure, I should mention that I serve in an advisory capacity on IPCOD’s executive board. I’m working with this project because I think a unified effort towards ‘coming out’ is a needed one, a complimentary movement to our already vibrant Pagan Pride days. I hope you’ll support IPCOD, and help spread the word. Addendum: Here’s more on IPCOD from Patheos.com.

Calling Ourselves Pagan: Since we just talked about “coming out” as a Pagan, perhaps we should also talk about the label of “Pagan” itself. In a recent guest-post for Patheos.com, Scott Reimers advocated finding a different word for our diverse movement. In response, author and teacher T. Thorn Coyle wrote a two-part essay discussing some questions and one possible answer to the issue of calling ourselves Pagan.

What do I think is this thing that ties such diverse ways and means of practice, experience, and belief together? We all have a sense of “Divine with us on earth.” The Gods are not just far off in Asgard, they are in our gardens and our homes. Goddesses don’t just live in some distant place, they help us run our businesses, and teach our children. And these Gods and Goddesses have their own agency, too. Paganism(s) and systems of magick – as they exist in contemporary religious expression in this loosely knit group of practitioners – hold theologies of immanence in common, whether this is directly acknowledged or not. Magick would not work without direct divine connection. Rituals would be meaningless or simply psychological exercises if there was not some strong, direct sense that whatever sacred energies or forces we work with were not here with us, right now.

That is what drew me to Paganism in the first place: God was not off in some distant and transcendent place. God Herself, and individual sacred expressions such as trees, ocean, stars, this particular God or that particular Goddess… were all moving, flowing, acting, resting, and directly making up the cosmos(es) right now. And so was I. If this was not the case, our magic would be simple begging and supplication. Instead, our magick, for those of us that do it, becomes a way to help create the world. Those of us who don’t do operative magick celebrate the realization that this sacred expression is with us every day. And for this, we give thanks: we dance around Maypoles, we raise horns of wine and beer in honor, we light candles to draw us deeper into contemplation, we make love as a way to draw closer to our Gods, knowing that often our Gods are as close as the breath of our lovers.

I anticipate that we are collectively stuck with “Pagan” for the foreseeable future. Perhaps a day will come when the various religions, traditions, and groups under our wide umbrella get big enough to not see (or need) the agency in being part of something larger, but I don’t think that day will come in my lifetime. However, for now, solidarity and collective effort is still needed to safeguard our basic rights, and advocate for equal treatment. To build basic religious services, and to gain the attention of the wider world. Even when we do reach the point where Wiccans, Druids, Asatru, and other faiths no longer need to be thrown together for various political reasons, we may find that we are all still attending the same parties.

The Correllians Get a New First Priestess: The Correllian Nativist Tradition have announced a restructuring and expansion of their Council of Elders, and have named a new First Priestess to replace the now-retired M. Rev. Krystel High-Correll.

“In addition M. Rev. Krystel High-Correll, First Priestess of the Correllian Tradition, has already been in retirement for several years now. As Retired First Priestess Lady Krystel does and always will enjoy the same level of respect and dignity that she has born for the last three decades of her imperium. Now, after much consideration, we are pleased to announce an Heir to the office of First Priestess: Lady Krystel and the entirety of the Council of Elders are pleased to name Rt. Rev. Traci Logan Wood as Heiress and Acting First Priestess, in accordance with the Rules of Succession of the Correllian Tradition as outlined in the Tradition bylaws. May the Blessing be upon the Acting First Priestess!”

In addition to naming Traci Logan Wood as First Priestess, a lifetime appointment, Ed Hubbard was also named as the new First Elder of the tradition and several new members of their Council of Elders were named in order “to fulfill the duties and offices needed for a Tradition that has become truly global.” My congratulations to to Wood, Hubbard, and the new Elders.

In a somewhat related note, congratulations to Pagans Tonight, which is quickly approaching its 500th episode.

More on Pagans in Prison: The PNC-Minnesota special series on Pagans in prison continues today, featuring an interview with Emrys Anu, a Wiccan Minister volunteering for the last six years at Rush City Correctional Facility.

“I work with mainly 20 – 40 year olds, and we work always within a ritual circle. Whatever work we plan for that day, we do in that circle. We create that as sacred space, and we consider what we do in there as our sacred work. We may have a lecture, a meditation, a reading, a ritual, or we may just talk. We just finished a ‘lecture’ on ‘what is Wicca?’. The history, and Paganism will be coming up. (Laughs, “It always comes up, “Do you worship Jesus, too?”) They often are asking for some kind of healing work. Typically some kind of energy work. We do a lot of different blessings. Blessings for impending court cases. When people leave we do a special blessing that always ends with “DON’T COME BACK! ”. We sometimes play games and do fun things. We play Wiccan charades, or ‘Wiccan Hangman’ and ‘Wiccan Hangman in Theban’. We have a fantastic energy sensing werewolf game that we play. We may discuss a book or do ritual planning. A few weeks before a Sabbat we talk about ritual in general, and what we will do for this one. How does it connect to nature and what is going on inside of us. It may be a full moon or dark moon. These might have some simple spell work within it. We meet once a week for two hours.”

Read the entire interview, here. In the next installment, Nels Linde will feature transcribed letters from prisoners and some editorial thoughts on the issue. This has been some excellent coverage on the issue, and I highly recommend heading over to PNC-Minnesota and reading the entire series (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4).

Patheos Interviews of Note: I just wanted to close with some quick links to two interviews of note over at the Patheos Pagan Portal. First, Galina Krasskova interviews author Melitta Benu, a practitioner of  Alexandrian Reconstruction. Then, the Staff of Asclepius blog interviews Pagan author and lecturer Janet Callahan. Both are thought-provoking and worth checking out.

That’s all I have for now, have a great day!

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Jason Pitzl-Waters

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  • http://www.facebook.com/EdAHubbard Ed Hubbard

    Thank you Jason for your kind announcement, and Yes the Correllian Tradition is working hard to be a force of benefit to it's members and the community at large. We are very grateful to all who want to serve, and this story is really about our members, than it is about the individuals.

  • http://www.facebook.com/zaracon Larry Zaracon Sodders

    Yes thank you Jason, thank you for your support and friendship.

  • http://www.hecatedemetersdatter.blogspot.com Hecate

    I anticipate that we are collectively stuck with “Pagan” for the foreseeable future. Perhaps a day will come when the various religions, traditions, and groups under our wide umbrella get big enough to not see (or need) the agency in being part of something larger, but I don’t think that day will come in my lifetime.

    Well, I love the term, so I don't feel "stuck" with it. "Christianity" is an umbrella term for a group of religions that, while often quite disparate, do have some basic organizing principles in common. Ditto "Islam" and "Judiasm." So why wouldn't/shouldn't there be an umbrella term that describes our family of religions? People who don't "feel" Pagan should be free to come up with other terms to describe themselves (although not to describe those of us who ARE Pagan), and that's fine. Let a million flowers bloom. I know what I am; I'm a Witch, which means that I'm a Pagan.

    • Crystal7431

      I'll second that, Hecate. In fact I love the term Pagan, always have. I don't find it stifling or limiting but very liberating.

      • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

        There are two historically attested terms of "self-designation" used by those who resisted Christianization.

        Back in late antiquity, Greek speakers proudly called themselves "Hellenes" as a religious label and without any implication of being "ethnically Greek" in the way one might think of it today. At the time, koine Greek was spoken throughout much of African and Asia, and the two largest Greek speaking population centers were Alexandria and Antioch. Being a "Hellene" also did not narrowly restrict the "pantheon" that one worshipped either, since a Hellene might very well be a devotee of Isis or Cybele, and even in the case of "Greek" deities, these were often not from among the main Olympians, and one finds a great deal of attention and devotion to Pan, Hecate, and Asclepius in particular.

        A bit more recently there is the case of the Saxons who (once again) revolted against the Franks in 841 (and they also revoted against those Saxon aristocrats who had sided with the Franks and were now Christian). These Saxon Heathens proudly called themselves "Stellinga", which in Old Saxon appears to have meant something like "comrade". The singular would be "Stelling".

        I think a good case could be made for either one of these terms being generally adopted by modern Pagans, but, at least in my opinion, it's far more important for us to realize that when we have felt the need to do so, Pagans have in the past been perfectly capable of creating our own terminology to describe who (and what) we are. I personally like the term "Pagan", but I also think that "Heathen" has quite a nice ring to it as well.

        • Baruch Dreamstalker

          "Hellene" would today have those ethnic implications that were absent originally, and thus would be a non-starter as an umbrella term. "Stellinga" wouldn't have such associated problems but would be up against the entrenched incumbent "Pagan."

          More important than the precise term is the reason we have one. One of the links Jason provided pondered whether, eg, reconstructionists from widely different parts of the planet would be in any kind of mutual communion but for the 800-lb gorilla of Christianity that confronts them both. Well, that's alternative-reality stuff. We DO confront that 800-lb gorilla and for the duration are bound together by out common interersts in the face of it.

          • http://www.craftandconjure.com SisterMoon13

            "That is what drew me to Paganism in the first place: God was not off in some distant and transcendent place. God Herself, and individual sacred expressions such as trees, ocean, stars, this particular God or that particular Goddess… were all moving, flowing, acting, resting, and directly making up the cosmos(es) right now. And so was I. If this was not the case, our magic would be simple begging and supplication. Instead, our magick, for those of us that do it, becomes a way to help create the world. Those of us who don’t do operative magick celebrate the realization that this sacred expression is with us every day. And for this, we give thanks: we dance around Maypoles, we raise horns of wine and beer in honor, we light candles to draw us deeper into contemplation, we make love as a way to draw closer to our Gods, knowing that often our Gods are as close as the breath of our lovers."

            This statement is a prayer within itself. Blessed Be, So mote it be!

          • Bookhousegal

            Your screen name reminds me of a cheesy Cult song that once a very long time ago, was prayer enough for me when I thought I was among the last 'Pagans' in the world.

            I couldn't be happier to dance Maypoles or raise a horn with *any* of my people, sing the old songs, weave the new ones, greet the future, past, and present *together,* but one thing *I* don't forget soon is that what makes us who we are isn't about words or buildings or statues or about *anything* that can be taken away.

            That, not names, or words, or things, is *why* we're still here.

            So blessed be. :)

  • Baruch Dreamstalker

    "Pagan" is a relatively new term as a self-ascribed identification of general spiritual direction. According to Wickipedia it wasn't used prior to the 1960s and really caught on in the 1970s. So in a sense it's been socially selected, in favor of e.g. "Witch "or "Earth Centered," as what someone called an umbrella label. Not by all, to be sure, but it's hard to imagine anything else replacing it (until something does, of course, and then we can dicuss the pro's and con's of *that* label).

    • http://norsealchemist.blogspot.com NorseAlchemist

      Then Wikipedia needs to get checked, because our types of practices and beliefs have been known as Pagan and Heathen ever since the Christians took any sort of power, and those were the nicer terms. They've been used for over fifteen hundred years.

      • Baruch Dreamstalker

        Alchemist, I said SELF-ASCRIBED identification. The Pagans and Heathens of antiquity did not call themselves that; others did. Contemporary movements are the first to apply the label to themselves. If you go back and read the rest of my original comment you'll find the point I was making.

        • thehouseofvines

          What about the Romantics? Many self-identified as Pagan and even (like Shelley) worshiped the old gods.

    • Bookhousegal

      It'll do. :)

      • http://www.mvtabilitie.blogspot.com Bo Williams

        Good Gods. I expected to be jumped on for that! You guys etc ;)

        The use of titles seems to have dropped out of British Wicca decades ago, to my (limited) knowledge.

        • Ben

          I'd never change my name and I'm heathen. I've seen so many do so and laugh at it. It would be an insult to your ancestors to change the name your parents gave you. I'm named after my ancestors, not some fake pagan name.

          • harmonyfb

            Everyone has the right to change their name if they so desire.

            But Wiccan craft names are for religious, not secular use – sometimes to take one out of oneself while worshiping, and sometimes to shield the identity of the worshiper from hostile individuals. It has nothing to do with changing the name your parents gave you. While I suppose someone out there might have changed their legal name to their craft name, I've never encountered such a person.

          • Ben

            But we don't need aliases, we're trying to become mainstream. I'm trying to maintain a positive image for Asatru and I don't want to look like a lying fanatic that's absolutely crazy about being some sort of viking.

          • harmonyfb

            Not everyone is privileged to be able to be open about their religion. Count yourself lucky if you are able to do so. I know of folks who've lost jobs, who've lost custody, who've been subjected to harassment and physical attacks because of their faith. To those who are hostile, we all look like 'lying fanatics' or 'crazy' – they don't need an excuse to think of us that way.

  • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

    Paganism is what people do, in terms of religion, when we are free to do as we please.

    • Baruch Dreamstalker

      Millions of people are Christians, Jews and Moslems with no coercion. (Millions of others are caught in a web of coercion.)

      • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

        Well, for the sake of argument, lets concede your point. This only proves that, when free to do as we please, humans often make lousy choices. (But that is part of the price of freedom.)

        • Baruch Dreamstalker

          Hard to argue with that.

      • thehouseofvines

        No coercision, perhaps, but are those millions even aware of other options?

        • Baruch Dreamstalker

          You raise an interesting point. Is freedom meaningful if one is not aware of the options one is free to choose? Most people are not fully aware of the religious options open to them, in the sense that any awareness they have is filtered through some dominant religion's propagandistic distortion of those alternatives.

          • http://kauko-niskala.blogspot.com kauko

            Not to mention societal pressures that may highly discourage them exploring other religions. That could be death in the case of many Muslim countries, and even here in the West you can easily face ridicule, if not rejection, by your family and friends for leaving the religion in which you were raised.

          • thehouseofvines

            Absolutely. I mean in many parts of the Middle East today you can be killed for ascribing to the wrong form of Islam, let alone some other religion.

      • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

        "Millions of people are Christians, Jews and Moslems with no coercion. (Millions of others are caught in a web of coercion.)"

        I think you need to be more specific about who you think these "millions" are that are Christian or Muslim "with no coercion".

        As far as Muslims go, this can hardly be taken seriously. Even Muslims born and raised in the West are routinely subjected to not just social pressure but out and out violence. This kind of coercion in Western Muslim communities is actively defended by many "liberals" in the name of multiculturalism, which in a sense is legitimate, because coercion and violence are a part of Islamic culture.

        As far as Christians go: show me a Christian and I will show you a person who was born into a society in which Christianity was imposed by coercive means. This might have been fairly recently, in the case of sub-saharan Africa, or a few centuries ago, in the case of Native Americans (including Latinos) and Filipinos, or it might have been several centuries ago or even over a thousand years ago, in the case of people of European descent.

        • Baruch Dreamstalker

          Congratulations, Apuleius, you have made meaningless your own original statement that Paganism is what people choose when they are free to do so, by demonstrating that no-one is free.

          • http://xkcd.com/285 Eran Rathan

            War is Peace.
            Freedom is Slavery.
            Ignorance is Strength.

            we have always been at war with Eastasia. Now back to work.

          • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

            Eran: We still have the choice to resist and to not love Big Brother. That is the whole point. Resistance is not futile.

          • Baruch Dreamstalker

            Treason! We have always been at war with Eurasia…

          • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

            "you have made meaningless your own original statement that Paganism is what people choose when they are free to do so, by demonstrating that no-one is free."

            There are two ways for a person to be free. One is to live in a natural state of freedom, making the assumption (common to both Rousseau and Jefferson) that freedom (and equality) is the natural state of humanity.

            But the other way to be free is to actively resist externally imposed limitations on one's freedom. This is possible because the Gods have given to human beings certain faculties that make it possible for us to exercise a kind of freedom that is impossible for anyone, or anything, to take away from us. The most important of these faculties are the ability to reason, and "greatness of spirit".

            Also: you have still given no indication, Baruch, about where it is that you claim all these (millions of!) Christians and Muslims are who are free from all coercion.

          • Baruch Dreamstalker

            The high quality of your review of freedom exposes your original statement, that Paganism is what people choose when they are free, as specious special pleading for Paganism. I often wish that my Christian brothers and sisters had the fortitude to rebut specious special pleading on behalf of Christianity, and I give witness to that wish by doing so to same on behalf of Paganism.

          • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

            The position that Paganism is the natural religion of humankind is not some idiosyncratic idea recently dreamt up by yours truly. It is an ancient theory that was articulated by Epicurus, Cicero, Iamblichus, Julian and many others. It is also found in David Hume's writings on "Natural Religion". More recently the same basic idea has been put forth by Theo Sundermeier (professor of theology at Heidelberg University), and Sundermeier's theory of "primary" and "secondary" religions has been picked up and further elucidated by egyptologist and historian of religions Jan Assmann.

            It can also be found at the Pagan Federation's website on the "Introduction to Paganism" page under the heading "What Paganism Is": "Paganism is the ancestral religion of the whole of humanity."

            None of these arguments by authority prove me right, of course. But they do indicate that this is a serious idea not so easily dismissed as "special pleading."

          • Baruch Dreamstalker

            But you didn't say Paganism is the natural or ancestral religion of all humanity. You said it's the religion of those who are free to choose, a different and far more political statement. I would wholly agree that Paganism is the ancestral religion of all humanity.

          • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

            I don't accept that these are two different positions at all. (1) Paganism is the ancestral religion of all humanity because (2) Paganism is what we spontaneously do by virtue of our natural inclinations.

          • Baruch Dreamstalker

            You are restating your original posting to elide the word "free."

          • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

            There is no eliding going on here. I originally stated: "Paganism is what people do, in terms of religion, when we are free to do as we please."

            This is the same as saying, "Paganism is what people naturally do." When people are free to do as we please, we do what comes naturally.

          • Baruch Dreamstalker

            It is not the same thing as saying that Paganism is the ancestral religion of the human race. Freedom is a Western political concept that came along millennia later.

  • Lady Jake

    I too love the term Pagan. Twenty years on my Path, the term Pagan continues to resonate for me in ways that I have found difficult to articulate – I think Thorn has got it exactly right in distilling the essence of Paganism(s) as IMMANENCE.

    I was also struck by something Katrina Messenger said in The Pagan Path doucmentary posted here last week: "Paganism is a term of solidarity."

    Personally, I identify as a dharma Pagan, which reflects the influence of Shakta Tantra, Yoga, and Buddhism upon my spiritual practice – as well as my devotion to Ma Kali, Who set my feet upon the Pagan path in the first place. As a student of the dharmic religions, I think that HInduism(s) provides a good model for Paganism(s): an umbrella term of problematic provenance which fosters pluralism and encompasses a gamut of religious traditions and modalities.

    Namaste & Blessed be!

    • thorncoyle

      Michael York also wrote about Immanence being a pagan essence in his article "Defining Paganism". I believe it is from 2000…
      http://www.proteuscoven.org/proteus/Pagndef.htm

    • http://egregores.blogspot.com/ Apuleius

      "Paganism is a term of solidarity."

      Indeed. Sanatana Dharma is really just Sanskrit for "the Old Religion"!

  • ipcod

    I've been reading the facebook page today and have been humbled and blessed at the stories people are sharing about when they came out to family and friends. It's an amazing conversation!
    http://www.facebook.com/PaganComingOutDay

  • http://www.facebook.com/OberonWhitethorn James Russell Rusty Broach

    I've always like Ceisiwr Serith's definition of Pagan. Which you can find here:
    http://www.ceisiwrserith.com/Paganism/whatdoesitm

  • http://www.mvtabilitie.blogspot.com Bo Williams

    Never liked (say it quietly) the Pagan habit of calling oneself Lord This and Lady That. Maybe this is a British perspective but it's always struck me as a crashingly egotistical and frankly somewhat vulgar thing to do. I mean, what so dispiriting about your daily life that you have to bestow a frickin' *title* upon yourself!? Can't one just honour the gods without bringing cringe-inducing self-aggrandisement into it? The only people who can get away with calling themselves 'The Lady X' are drag queens.

    • http://www.tigerseyetemple.org/ DanMiller

      Great post Bo. Magical titles create barriers and classist hierarchy, instead of letting ones works (or lack of works) speak for themselves. Same could be said for those who use magical names in public, rather than their legal names. That would make an interesting discussion.

      • http://xkcd.com/285 Eran Rathan

        I feel the same way about people calling themselves 'High Priest/ess' when obviously unqualified to babysit, let alone lead a congregation.

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Camille-Klein/100001266797497 Camille Klein

          I see nothing at all wrong with the term "Pagan".

      • Leea

        Indeed Dan. Actually I'm not overly bothered by the name in public thing, because it seems that many are using it because they aren't "out" in public, or have published or become well known in that aspect…still-sometimes-it's just annoying….

    • Baruch Dreamstalker

      I agree, Bo. I've always assumed the "Lord/Lady" habit originated among British Witches, as a way to create aristocracy in a movement made up of commoners. As an American I felt no need to do that when I chose a magickal name. My name honors my roots and my path, and that's plenty.

      • http://ianphanes.livejournal.com/ Ian Phanes

        Nope, it is an American innovation. The Brits have been appalled by it at least since Doreen Valiente. :)

  • harmonyfb

    When will American Mystic be released? ::is impatient to be savoring its delights::

  • embreis

    Choosing to call ourselves "Pagans" back in the day was, in part, a conscious act of defiance and confrontation: we were deliberately identifying ourselves with the people who resisted Christianity. That was part of the attraction of identifying ourselves as "witches" as well, but the word "Pagan" was free of some of the other baggage that "witch" carried; there had never been a popular sitcom about wacky Pagans living in suburbia, for example.
    Also, "Pagan" also implied an appreciation of the sensual world and what might now be called a "sex-positive" attitude, and calling oneself a Pagan was an affirmation of that.

  • http://jakejackson.wordpress.com/ Skye

    "The Gods are not just far off in Asgard, they are in our gardens and our homes."

    Way to alienate us heathens here. Thanks a bunch.

    • Jason Pitzl-Waters

      How does that alienate Heathens? Is the Heathen view that the Gods are only in Asgard? That they aren't accessible?

      • http://jakejackson.wordpress.com/ Skye

        Sorry, that was a very hastily posted comment. What I wanted to say was that i think he could of worded it better, or used a better example. Most heathens see their Gods as close to home and present in their daily lives. I feel that using Asgard as an example perhaps wasn't the best choice.

        • http://ianphanes.livejournal.com/ Ian Phanes

          Thorn wrote: "The Gods are not just far off in Asgard, they are in our gardens and our homes."

          Skye wrote: "Most heathens see their Gods as close to home and present in their daily lives."

          What is the difference between these two statements? They look semantically interchangeable to me.

          • Ben

            I really do think heathens are almost totally ignored in this Wild Hunt thing. It's always Wicca this, Wicca that. I'm totally unfamiliar with Wicca, but I know it's very different from Asatru and other reconstructionist religions. It's like expecting Asatru news from a site that mostly deals with Hindus. I feel foreign here.

          • Jason Pitzl-Waters

            I mention Asatru as often as I can. But Wicca is numerically larger, and more prone towards getting media attention, so they get more coverage overall. I think any fair reading of my site would see that I cover a large variety of religious traditions and perspectives, not just Wicca.

          • http://kauko-niskala.blogspot.com kauko

            To suggest that heathens are 'almost totally ignored' here could only be said by someone who doens't actually follow The Wild Hunt very often or carefully. Many traditions outside of Wicca, including Heathens, are covered frequently. I'd even go so far as to suggest that Heathens along with Afro-Carribean religions receive the most coverage here after Wicca. Additionally, there are many active heathens among those who comment here who bring heathen perspectives to the discussion.

          • grimmorrigan

            If you cannot find a heathen presence on the Wild Hunt I fear you are actively ignoring it. My suggestion would be to carfully read this blog and appreciate what Jason gives the community rather than making comlpiants which cannot be verified with factual material.

          • thehouseofvines

            Ha! You think Heathens are under-represented here at the Wild Hunt you should try belonging to the cult of the deified Marcus Antonius. I don't think that Ciceronian has mentioned us once the whole time he's been blogging! Granted, there's only about 5-10 of us left in the world today and we haven't done a whole lot that's newsworthy of late, but why should that matter?!?!

            In all seriousness this is Jason's blog and he can write about whatever the hell he wants. If he felt like devoting himself entirely to the culture of knitting and cupcake-making he'd have every right to do so. Instead each day he provides a valuable resource linking the broad and diverse Pagan communities together and informing us of important things that are happening in our world that might potentially affect us. He provides this content free of charge even though it must consume hours and hours of his day to track down the material and stay abreast of unfolding developments in older stories. Complaining about something that's just handed to you shows poor character – especially since close scrutiny of this site would reveal, as others have pointed out, that Heathenry actually gets a substantial amount of airtime alongside the Afro-Carribean religions. Wicca may get more of that, but Wiccans are numerically superior and many of them are in the forefront of the battles for equal rights and recognition.

          • Nick_Ritter

            "…especially since close scrutiny of this site would reveal, as others have pointed out, that Heathenry actually gets a substantial amount of airtime alongside the Afro-Carribean religions."

            That's true. In fact, considering what a small part of the overall Heathen population we are, the attention that Jason gives to Theodism is astounding, and one of the reasons I was attracted to this blog in the first place.

            As for the modern obscurity of the cult of the deified Marcus Antonius, I can only say that there can be a certain comfort in not having your religious tradition scrutinized by outsiders.

          • thehouseofvines

            That and getting lumped in with the nutjobs.

          • whateley23

            You really do think that? I don't see it, myself, considering the extensive coverage that Dan Halloran got, to pick just one example. Wicca gets a certain amount of coverage, it's true, but the alternative would be to ignore one of the largest pagan religions out there. The Wild Hunt seems to do a pretty darned good job of covering a wide variety of religions which all have common cause, from Shinto and Hinduism to the Afro-Caribbean religions, Asatru, and Wicca, among others.

            So, if you want more coverage of Asatru and other reconstructionist religions, perhaps you might start your own news blog. I'd read it, as I consider myself following a reconstructionist religion.

          • Lonespark

            Yes, this Heathen agreees.

          • Baruch Dreamstalker

            I think this is a fair question, Ben: Can you name an important reconstrutionist story that the Wild Hunt ignored?

          • Bookhousegal

            Can't favor that point enough, Baruch.

            What's not being covered, here?

            If so, did the complainer bring any stories to Jason's attention?

          • Ben

            Perhaps those associated with semtic polytheism?

          • http://jakejackson.wordpress.com/ Skye

            But using the heathen cosmology to represent something that is foreign to a heathen perspective seems strange to me. Anyway, it's really of no importance.

        • grimmorrigan

          What would be a better choice? Why is Asgard a poor one?

  • Ben

    I mean I guess religious titles are ok, but I'm in total disagreement with name changing.