The Lost Racist Book of Ancient Celtic Druidry?

Jason Pitzl-Waters —  November 22, 2008 — 43 Comments

Prompted in part by a listing at The Witches’ Voice, several members of the Celtic Reconstructionist and Druidic communities* have been examining the dubious claims of a new book by Steven Akins. The self-published book, “The Lebor Feasa Runda: A Druidic Grammar of Celtic Lore and Magic”, claims to be an English translation of a German translation of a before-now undiscovered book of ancient Druid lore.

“In his highly anticipated English translation of the ancient Irish text known as the Lebor Feasa Runda (Book of Secret Knowledge), Celtic scholar and historian, Steven L. Akins, has at last made available to readers the wealth of pre-Christian teachings espoused by the Druids in this seminal work of pagan religious literature. Basing his translation on the only extant transcription of the now lost Black Book of Loughcrew, the actual doctrines of the Celtic priesthood are finally brought to light in this timeless rendering of these sacred scriptures.”

There are several problems with his claims of finding this book, not least of which is the fact that it hasn’t been submitted for peer review to any Universities or reputable Celtic scholars. A strange move for a find that would completely revolutionize the field of Celtic Studies (especially Celtic Studies scholars in Germany, who would most likely be eager to verify the validity of a German translation of an ancient Gaelic text) if proven true. Further complicating the reputation of Akins is his involvement in a bribery scandal to attain the rights to a Scottish coat of arms.

“Steven Akins, styled himself as Steven L. Akins of that Ilk, Hereditary Chief of the name and arms of the Clan Akins … created a clan badge, crest and tartan for his clan and petitioned the Lord Lyon King of Arms to claim the right to use a coat of arms of an alleged ancestor and legitimize his clan. On April 15, 2001 an article in the Sunday Mail, a Scottish newspaper, stated that Steven Akins allegedly attempted to bribe a Glasgow man in aiding him in his bid to be recognized as chief of Clan Akins. Akins allegedly wished to plant a forged tombstone with a coat of arms inscription, accompanied with forged genealogical records to prove his family was based in Lanarkshire in the 1700s. Steven Akins’ petition was ultimately rejected because of fraudulent information.”

As if these factors weren’t enough to raise doubts about the “Lebor Feasa Runda”, it also seems to have gained quite a bit of popularity (warning: link to racist site) with the virulent racists at Stormfront. One entry at the hate-site reproduces the entire author’s preface (again, warning, racist site link) which makes clear exactly why racist Pagans would enjoy Akin’s book.

“The disciples of this völkisch esoteric organization [Thule Gesellschaft] saw evidence for an Atlantean origin of the Aryan race in the lore contained within the Lebor Feasa Rúnda, specifically in the legends relating to the ancient gods of the pagan Celts having come from a mysterious island in the North Atlantic, bringing with them the four hallowed treasures of the Tuatha Dé Danann. The fact that the Lebor Feasa Rúnda apparently corroborated the Thule doctrine of Aryan racial origins led to Reichsführer Heinrich Himmler ordering its siezure by the S.S. following Adolf Hitler’s rise to power … At face value, the Lebor Feasa Rúnda, fulfills the same role in pagan Celtic spirituality as the Bible, the Torah, or the Koran do in the Christian, Jewish, and Islamic religions.”

Akins himself, at the OBOD message boards, has referred to himself as “protective” and “restrictive” in regards to his (white) race (and lists Adolf Hitler as a “hero” on his MySpace page). While that is surely his personal prerogative, the fact that racial “Druidic” teachings that “corroborate” the Thule Society** should suddenly appear from Akins casts further doubt that this book is anything other than his own invention. I would caution anyone interested in this Celtic “bible” to consider the source before spending your money. Further, modern practitioners of Celtic and Celtic-derived Pagan spiritualities reject any notions of “Celtic blood” being a prerequisite to participate in living Celtic cultures or reconstructed Celtic religions.

ADDENDUM: Celticist Dr. Phillip A. Bernhardt-House has done a examination of material posted online concerning this book, and posted an academic (p)review of his findings.

* I would like to thank Erynn Laurie, C. Lee Vermeers, and others in the CR and Drudic communities who provided me with information for this post.

** Aside from the Nazis, the book is also credited with inspiring everything from the Templars to the OTO, and was allegedly in the hands of people like Roger Bacon and John Dee. That before-now unpublished book sure did get around!

Send to Kindle

Jason Pitzl-Waters

Posts

  • Lori

    So he found an ancient book from what is primarily an oral-tradition and no one else gets to verify it? hmmmm. I wonder if he has magic glasses that allow him to translate it as well.

  • Jason Pitzl-Waters

    Ben,”it seems to be jumping to conclusions to suggest that his work is any sort of racist diatribe”Except for the fact that he himself, in the author’s preface says that the work “corroborates” the beliefs of the racist Thule society. Also I never called the book a “racist diatribe”, but you don’t get fanboys at Stormfront by preaching love among the races.Finally, no matter how “surprisingly good” the writing may be, it is still a transparent fraud. One that has been dismissed by Celtic Studies scholars.

  • Ben Edair

    Jason, You chose to abstract only a very brief statement made in the author’s preface that you refer to, which was posted at: http://www.stormfront.org/forum/showthread.php?p=6095642#post6095642Which of course is very easy to take out of context and use to put a negative spin on the book, which seems to be your intention. However in the interest of unbiased integrity, I think it would only be fair to print the entire statement referencing the Nazi’s interest in the work that this book purports to be a translation of, which reads as follows: “At some point in the late 19th century, the Black Book of Loughcrew passed between the hands of Austrian mystic Guido von List, and Carl Kneller, a wealthy German industrialist and Freemason who, together with Theodor Reuss, went on to found a secret society known as the Ordo Templi Orientis, or O.T.O., prior to his death in 1905. From that point the book came into the possession of Rudolf von Sebottendorff, a member of the List-inspired secret society known as the Germanenorden, who in collaboration with Walter Nauhaus founded an occult study group called the Thule Gesellschaft. The disciples of this völkisch esoteric organization saw evidence for an Atlantean origin of the Aryan race in the lore contained within the Lebor Feasa Rúnda, specifically in the legends relating to the ancient gods of the pagan Celts having come from a mysterious island in the North Atlantic, bringing with them the four hallowed treasures of the Tuatha Dé Danann. The fact that the Lebor Feasa Rúnda apparently corroborated the Thule doctrine of Aryan racial origins led to Reichsführer Heinrich Himmler ordering its siezure by the S.S. following Adolf Hitler’s rise to power. Nazi ideology sought to equate the legendary Celtic treasures with long-lost relics of antiquity such as the Holy Grail, the Spear of Destiny and the Stone of Scone, all of which were ear-marked by Himmler for an official scavenger hunt carried out by the S.S. The ancient manuscript even inspired neo-pagan Nazi rituals such as the one in which a huge Celtic-style cauldron fashioned from 24 pounds of solid gold was cast into the Bavarian lake of Chiemsee as a votive offering during a ceremony performed to secure Nazi victory through propitiating the ancestral gods.”

  • Jason Pitzl-Waters

    “in the interest of unbiased integrity”I don’t see how that expanded selection in any way exonerates Akins. It’s still a mishmash of unfounded claims involving this “ancient” manuscript and the Nazis. If Akins had any “unbiased integrity” he’s submit all his data to a peer review. Which he won’t, because he’s intent on making a buck at the expense of credulous seekers.

    • Jason Pitzl-Waters

      Also, speaking of integrity, any word on if Akins is going to make a statement condemning the use of his book by racists?

    • Ben Edair

      Jason, The fact that the book mentions the Nazis doesn’t make it a racist book, nor would the fact that the Nazis were interested in using the text on which this translation is based to further their own agenda make it racist. The Nazis were interested in finding the Lost Ark of the Covenant, but the fact that they wanted to use it for some purpose doesn’t make the Jews who made the Ark racists. You must be aware of some passage in the book that I have not seen to be claiming it as a racist book. I’m assuming therefore that you have read it, so which particular part of the text is it that strikes you as promoting a white-supremacist agenda?

      • Ben Edair

        “Tell you what, why don’t you quote to me the part where I said the book promoted a white-supremacist agenda.”Well, you have titled the blog “The Lost Racist Book of Ancient Celtic Druidry” which implies that you consider it to be a racist book; something that has yet to be substantiated by anyone, most notably yourself; and yes for the past couple of hours I have been reading through the book which arrived this afternoon, having ordered the hardcover edition from Amazon.com last week. So far I have found it to be quite an enjoyable read. The book itself is divided into two sections, the first of which comprises a number of stories belonging to the Irish mythological cycle; while the second half of the book is arranged much like a western magical grimoire, but wholly Celtic/Druidic in nature. Having read through the first 80 pages, I have yet to find anything that suggests the text is a hoax, nor have I found any racial content whatsoever. And on the back there are no less that four reviews quoted, which read as follows: “This groundbreaking new translation of surviving Druidic scriptures is truly a key to unlocking the mysteries of the Celtic magickal tradition.” – Rowan Trevelyan, The Silver Cauldron “Here is an astonishing chronicle of the lost wisdom which is the heart and soul of Celtic spirituality. No other work has ever revealed so much of the inner mysteries that are the basis of true Druidism.” – Iain MacGregor Farquharson, Alban Druid Fellowship“The Lebor Feasa Rúnda represents the most significant revelation of ancient Celtic beliefs and authentic Druid teachings ever published….truly a treasure.” – Dalan O’Connor, Comhairle Draíochta na hÉrieann “An extraordinary account of the mystical doctrines that are the foundation of genuine Druidry….the Lebor Feasa Rúnda offers an unprecedented exploration of the secret knowledge which enables us to reestablish the connection between ourselves and the native gods of the Pagan Celts.” – Morgan Powyll, Keepers of AvalonAs for the books popularity among individuals that you term “racists” I can only conclude that a religious text originating from a Western European source (in this case Ireland) would be preferrable to individuals of Western European descent, in comparison to a religious text that is foreign to their culture and originates from a people whose ethnic identity they do not share.

        • Ben Edair

          Tomas, I made a point of asking Mr. Akins several rather blunt questions about many of the matters that have been brought up, and he was kind enough to respond accordingly, giving direct, no-nonsense answers to each of the qestions posed. For those who might be interested his reading his responses here on this blog, I have copied and pasted them below from the mystic wicks message board:Mr. Edair,I’ll be happy to answer your questions, and I appreciate your giving me the opportunity to address each of the points that you have brought up directly to me.In answer to the question of why I chose to self-publish the Lebor Feasa Runda through iUniverse, rather than going through a more traditional publishing company, there are several reasons. Initially I did consider going through one of the more established publishing houses, there were several that I submitted the manuscript to, but of those who were interested in it, it would have taken about two years for them to actually get it to market due to their backlog of publishing other titles already ahead of mine; which was longer than I cared to wait in order to make it available to the public. So I began looking into self-publishing companies, and decided to go with iUniverse primarily based upon the upfront cost, the quality of their finished product, and the amount of control they gave me in designing the layout of the book, illustrating it, designing the cover, chosing the type faces for chapter headings and so on. They handle the acquisition of the book’s ISBN number and it’s placement on Amazon.com and other on-line booksellers. Also the royalties are somewhat higher than they would have been had I gone through a more traditional publishing house. As for why I did not submit my translation to a peer review, there were a couple of reasons why that never happened. I did get in touch with Ronald Hutton and Joseph Peterson early on before seeking publication of the text, but they were unable to accomidate me due to their already demanding schedules, and another scholar I contacted expected to receive financial reimbursement for his endorsment of my work. The idea of actually paying a fellow scholar for their professional endorsement is nothing short of bribery in my opinion, and I personally feel that the reading public is quite intelligent enough to make their own determinations about the merits of any given publication without the necessity of having someone else tell them what they should or should not read. Several individuals within the Pagan community who I shared my work with prior to getting it published were kind enough to provide me with their reviews of it, and these are the ones that ended up on the dust jacket.In regard to my credibility and the effects upon it that were made as a result of a slanderous tabloid article instigated by a man whom my ex-wife was at the time involved with, which led to my divorcing her and seeking the custody of my two children; that was an unfortunate scheme which my ex-wife seems to have concocted together with her paramour to damage my reputation and discredit me as an individual in her hopes that she might prevent me from securing the custody of my son and daughter. All of that having occurred during the time in which a petition I had sent to the Lord Lyon King of Arms in Scotland, seeking his recognition of my family’s coat of arms, under the status of what are considered to be “ancient arms” in Scotland, the country from which my family long ago emigrated. The status of “ancient arms” being arms that can be proven to have been in use prior to the establishment of Lyon Register of all Arms and Bearings in Scotland, which was begun in the year 1672. My own family left Scotland several years before the register was begun in 1672, having emigrated to the Ulster Province of Ireland after the Cromwellian Civil War deposed King Charles I (the monarch my ancestors supported), and later my family ended up in the colony of Maryland, which is were my earliest American ancestor in the Akins line died in 1669. So, I was faced with providing Lord Lyon with several hundreds of years worth of documentation prooving my descent from this armigerous ancestor (who is buried here in the United States, near Baltimore). It was while my petition to the Lord Lyon was pending that the “gentleman” my ex-wife had involved herself with, a Mr. Wallace who lives in an rented apartment in Glasgow, Scotland, contacted the court of Lord Lyon with some ridiculous story that I had asked him to plant a fake tombstone in a Scottish cemetery in order to substantiate my claim to the coat of arms my family has borne for well over 400 years, even though there was already documented evidence here in the United States of its use. Ultimately, the Lord Lyon declined to make a ruling on the status of my family’s coat of arms, due to the absurd accusations made by Mr. Wallace, and the whole thing ended up getting published in a cheap Scottish tabloid called “The Sunday Mail” which is one of those unreliable scandal-sheets that are sold at the check-out stands of grocery stores, along the lines of the National Enquirer, who will print any sort of sensationalist tripe to fill the pages of their odious tabloids. As to your last question regarding regarding any sort of associations that I have with racist organizations, I am not now, nor have I ever been a member of any such group or organization. My political views are not completely in line with either right-wing conservatives nor with far-left liberals. For instance, I support the death penalty and the right to bear arms, but I am also pro-choice on the issue of abortion and I am against mixing organized religion with public institutions and offices. As far as the issue of race is concerned, I believe that each race should endeavor to be the best it can be independantly, and that all races should strive to maintain and preserve their cultural, ethnic and genetic integrity.

      • Anonymous

        Positive reviews from neopagan authors is not proof of intellectual integrity in any religious or occult book, Edair, not remotely.I can only conclude that a religious text originating from a Western European source (in this case Ireland) would be preferable to individuals of Western European descent, in comparison to a religious text that is foreign to their culture and originates from a people whose ethnic identity they do not share.Ethnic identity is irrelevant here (other than the fact that your own biases are clearly showing already), neither you nor the author has shown proof that it was actually written by the Celts, much less that there were written any guides to Druid rituals to begin with (you don’t have to be a scholar to be aware of the fact that the Celts never wrote any guides to rituals down). Really, what part of There are several problems with his claims of finding this book, not least of which is the fact that it hasn’t been submitted for peer review to any Universities or reputable Celtic scholars. A strange move for a find that would completely revolutionize the field of Celtic Studies (especially Celtic Studies scholars in Germany, who would most likely be eager to verify the validity of a German translation of an ancient Gaelic text) if proven true. Further complicating the reputation of Akins is his involvement in a bribery scandal to attain the rights to a Scottish coat of arms. do you not understand?At most, this book like little more than a bad parody of the usual crap sold on a regular basis in the average neopagan section of most bookstores, certainly nothing to be taken seriously.-bee sharp

        • Rhomylly Forbes

          Ah, yes. THAT book. The small Pagan publisher I am acquisitions editor for (Ground Mark) turned that down quite some time ago, partly for plaigarism reasons, and partly because the hoo-ha about the author’s trying to get a bogus Scottish clan crest/tartan recognized would have been a major publicity nightmare.Alas, I have no idea what the managing editor found to spark the plaigarism charge. I am sorry.

    • Jason Pitzl-Waters

      Ben,”so which particular part of the text is it that strikes you as promoting a white-supremacist agenda?”Tell you what, why don’t you quote to me the part where I said the book promoted a white-supremacist agenda.By the way Ben, other than the short excerpt Akins posted, have you read the book? Are you convinced at its authenticity? That its an ancient text? Why do you think racists like it so much? Has Akins addressed this?

    • Ben Edair

      Everyone is, of course, entitled to their own opinions, though what these are based upon varies greatly in degrees of quality and reliability. That being said, it’s highly doubtful that anyone knocking about in the little hamlet of Coligne, France, in the late 19th century would have thought that the Celts living in that region 1800 years earlier would have ever produced a large bronze calendar that had been left laying about for all those centuries, but lo and behold, there it was. Nah, couldn’t have been the work of the Druids, they never wrote anything down, and we all know that is true because Caesar himself said so in a book!

      • Jason Pitzl-Waters

        “…among individuals that you term ‘racists’…”Actually Ben (if that is actually your name, and you aren’t a sock-puppet), Stormfronters are described as “racist” by pretty much everyone who is willing to acknowledge that racism exists. For instance, the Anti-Defamation League had this to say…“Since its creation, Stormfront has served as a veritable supermarket of online hate, stocking its shelves with many forms of anti-Semitism and racism. In its first two years, Stormfront featured the writings of William Pierce of the neo-Nazi National Alliance; David Duke; representatives of the Holocaust-denying Institute for Historical Review and other assorted extremists.”http://www.adl.org/poisoning_web/black.aspYeah, I’m sure there are loads of innocent “concerned” citizens there chilling out in-between posts calling for the lynching of Jena protesters, denying the Holocaust, and crowing about how Obama is boosting membership in their “pride” group.

        • Anonymous

          Ben, the book has many elements that point to it being a likely fraud: why didn’t the author, being a Celtic scholar, submit it for peer review and share it with the rest of the Celtic academic community as any credible scholar would? This is a monumental, groundbreaking discovery, yet he keeps it to himself and publishes it through a self-publishing company, then has Neopagan authors and leaders endorse it. The excerpts of the book that the author has posted so far, such as those on Mystic Wicks, contain anachronistic language and mythic elements, and elements that don’t corroborate too well with other texts. Not to mention the author has a history of fraudulent activity. It all makes the text highly suspicious. –Tomas

          • Tomas

            Ben, I’m finding it very unlikely that Mr. Hutton, though he himself not a Celtic scholar, would not find time to examine the manuscript or direct Mr. Akins to Celtic scholars who would probably be doing back flips to get a look at it. As for his political views, he has made them quite clear on the OBOD link Jason provided in the article. He has commented on “Racial Purity,” “Racial Integration,” “African-Americans,” and “Mixed-Race Children.”http://tinyurl.com/5sltgoI remain unconvinced by Mr. Akin’s further elaborations.

          • Jason Pitzl-Waters

            Should the tolerant tolerate intolerance? A philosophical question for the ages.I have found that the ones who complain the loudest about liberal “intolerance” are often the ones who most fear the fruits of a tolerant and pluralistic society.

          • thebluelotus

            Ben Edair:The Thomas Jefferson quote really isn’t relevant here. Racism as it exists in the world today is not a harmless personal belief. It strongly affects people’s lives, some more than others. Academic dishonesty interferes with other scholarship in that field and both scholars and spiritual seekers have a prerogative to root it out where it exists. “Just not buying it” isn’t enough if the statements about this book are true.

          • Pingback: The Wild Hunt » The Racist Appropriation of Pagan (and Christian) Symbols()

          • Pingback: The Wild Hunt » Michael York at the Parliament and other Pagan News of Note()

    • faoladh

      Ben Edair,that’s absurd. of course one can discriminate based on imaginary or meaningless properties. it’s just a stupid thing to do. one might, for instance, manufacture a secret conspiracy of all people with type AB+ blood, and assume that any apparently benign actions of such people are cover for their hidden corrupt soul. after all, they can take blood donations from anyone, but are “not able” to make them in return (“not able” or “won’t”, eh?). that’s the level of validity that most of us see in racist nonsense, such as that expressed in the quote from Mr. Akins – which is to say, no validity at all.

  • Anonymous

    Since I can’t edit-Well, it is an issue, but not in the way you and his other fans (though I do suspect you might be the author of it here) would like to frame it here, and the owner of this blog is certainly right on all counts. This book we are speaking of would be discussed with the same amount of skepticism regardless of whether or not the author was white, and the ethnicity of the individual doesn’t make it any more or less a complete bunch of lies.-bee sharp

    • Ben Edair

      That of course is your perrogative. With every issue there are at least two different ways of looking at things. I feel that it’s always best to hear both sides of any argument; and whether I agree or disagree with someone’s personal points of view on a certain subject, that shouldn’t necessarily reflect on my judgement in regard to other matters concerning that individual. What I do often see in cases of those who make pretensions of political-correctness and tout the virtues of tollerance toward nearly everything, is that such individuals are often intollerant of others who do not share their “anything goes” outlook on life; thus revealing that they are not nearly as tollerant as they pretend to be, but are merely pushing a certain prejudicial liberalist agenda themselves which often conflicts with the more conservative positions held by others. In other words, they are like the pot calling the kettle black – your basic example of hipocrisy.”The books that the world calls immoral are the books that show the world its own shame” – Oscar Wilde

      • Ben Edair

        Tomas, If that is your opinion, then keep your money where your virtue is by not buying his book, certainly no one is suggesting that you should if it offends your principles. “It does me no injury for my neighbor to say that there are twenty gods, or no god. It neither picks my pocket, no breaks my leg.” – Thomas Jefferson

        • faoladh

          Ben Adair quoted Mr. Akins as having written:“As far as the issue of race is concerned, I believe that each race should endeavor to be the best it can be independantly, and that all races should strive to maintain and preserve their cultural, ethnic and genetic integrity.”um, that’s more or less a restatement of the classic racist position, expanding slightly on the famous fourteen words coined by David Lane of the neo-nazi group called The Order. one serious problem with it, from the nonracist perspective, is that it presupposes that “race” is a useful category in the first place. that is not a worthwhile assumption to make.

          • Ben Edair

            faoladh, While I am aware that certain people of a very liberalist mentality try to deny that there are different races of human beings, I cannot help be see such denial as being an absurdity. It is equivalent to saying that there is no such thing as different breeds of dogs, when in fact it is exceedingly obvious that there are different canine breeds, just as there are different races of humans. While there are some dogs who are mixed and do not belong to any particular breed, that in no way invalidates the existence of the the many other various breeds, and the same holds true for humans. Perhaps it is simply part of the liberalist agenda to encourage inter-breeding between races as a means of doing away with the differences between them; but that in itself is an extremely radical ideology which is far less desirable than one which would seek to preserve the distinctions that are an intrinsic part of the various races in their natural state of existence. Ben

          • Jason Pitzl-Waters

            Due to some particularly mean-spirited comments I’ve had to moderate, commenting on this post is now closed. At this point I don’t see the debate as productive any longer, and is veering into territory unrelated to the veracity of Akin’s book.

  • Erynn

    Jason — more excerpts from the book can be found in the thread at http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?t=205102It's a bunch of Neopagan mishmash in pseudo-Victorian fairy-tale language that bears little to no resemblance to any kind of actual translations from an Old or Middle Irish text that I can find. The whole thing is rather like Douglas Monroe with Hitler decorations from the Stormfront folks.

  • Tomas Flannabhra

    Ben, I hope you’re not trying to make this a liberal/ conservative issue as this matter really transcends that pettiness. I have not been one to preach ‘tolerance in nearly everything,’ and some things I cannot tolerate are academic/ intellectual dishonesty and fallacious ideologies regarding race. This book is the epitome of the former and the author embraces the latter, mingling his ideologies with Irish lore. This is not a matter any virtuous Celtic Polytheist should suffer.

    • Ben Edair

      faoladh,If different races do not exist (which is what you seem to suggest), then there can be no such thing as racism or racists; in which case your objections to Mr. Akins’ views on such matters become entirely moot, as one cannot discriminate against that which does not exist.Ben

  • John N

    “Having read through the first 80 pages, I have yet to find anything that suggests the text is a hoax, nor have I found any racial content whatsoever. And on the back there are no less that four reviews quoted, which read as follows:…Rowan Trevelyan, The Silver Cauldron…Iain MacGregor Farquharson, Alban Druid Fellowship…Dalan O’Connor, Comhairle Draíochta na hÉrieann …Morgan Powyll, Keepers of Avalon” So, four reviews from unknown individuals from unknown organisations (try Googling them), is supposed to convince us that this isn’t a hoax?

  • Pingback: The Wild Hunt » (Pagan) News of Note()

  • Livia Indica

    Sounds like a raging case of a bullshit artist creating more bullshit to validate racist bullshit.

  • Celestite

    another whackjobIt seems as though you can get anything published these days. And once published it becomes true. Going back to my cave now.

  • Erynn

    Thank you so much for following up on this and reporting about it with all the pertinent links. It’s so important to expose frauds like this, particularly when they have such hateful connections with well-known racist organizations. I appreciate your work in running down all the information and presenting it in one place.

  • Kathryn Price NicDhàna

    Thanks, Jason. It seems the crazies just keep coming out of the woodwork. Or, the Intarwebs. Thanks for helping shine the light on the latest loon.

  • S

    Cripes, what an idiot. In the American south, we have a time-honored ritual for this type of thing:(spits on the ground, adjusts ballcap) “Bubba, I gotta call bullshit on that.” (cues a bunch of guys to toss Adkins in the back of a large 4-wheel-drive pickup, with a big jar of honey and a map to the largest fire ant nest within 50 miles)

  • Ben Edair

    Mr. Akins actually posted an excerpt from his book on the MysticWicks message board at: http://mysticwicks.com/showthread.php?t=205102&page=4 #32 I have to say that it was suprisingly good, though I have no scholarly credentials to attest its authenticity; but there hardly seems to be anything that could be interpreted as being of a "racist" nature in the part that he has posted. Given that, it seems to be jumping to conclusions to suggest that his work is any sort of racist diatribe, and I would say that it is prejudicial to condemn it as such without having read it.

  • Oracle

    racism flourishes in the ignorant like weeds in an untended garden

  • Bo

    It’s obviously the work of a whackjob. As someone who teaches Celtic Studies (at Cambridge, UK) I can vouch for the preposterousness of this idiot’s claims.Mark

  • RoadPoet-NY.com

    Is is possible that this is an ancient equivalent of a Turner Diary or other literate celto-germanic nutbag’s writings? There has never been a time without ignorance.

  • S

    ****Apologies, that should be Akins. I was late, and it was tired.Snooze